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http://archive.org/details/stmarysschoolbul 1 9091 91 2 



A»8«at, 1909 



BttitB I, No. 14 



&L i$ary b l^rfjool 



BULLETIN 




Amuwttretttfttt of tfff iflluBir Department 

1909=10 



•JJuhltaljed QPuartprltj bg §>t. fHarg'si ^rtjool 

•&aleisf), jSortf) Carolina 



ENTERED JULY 3, 1905; AT RALEIGH, N.C., AS SECOND CLASS 

MATTER; UNDER ACT OF CONGRESS OF 

JULY 16; 1894 

Saint Mary's School Library 



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At Jfflarp'g dcftool 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Founded in 1842 by Aldert Smedes, D.D. 



Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector. 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal. 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK.. .Secretary and Business Manager. 



- 1*4 ,s 



For general information concerning St. Mary's as 
a whole, or specific information covering the Aca- 
demic Department (College and Preparatory School), 
the Art, Elocution or Business Departments, consult 
other numbers of the Bulletin". 



No. 7. History. 
No. 12. Educational Position. 
No. 13. General Information. 

No. 15. Academic Department, Art, Elocution, and Busi- 
ness Departments (September, 1909). 
No. 16. Scholarships (November; 1909) . 



14179 



This number of the Bulletin contains full infor- 
mation about the work of the Music Department of 
St. Mary's. 

PAGE 

Academic Credit 14 

Awards 13 

Calendar 6 

Classification 11 

Courses 14 

Faculty 5 

General Remarks i 7 

Graduation 14 

Organ 18 

Piano 17 

Voice 18 

Violin 19 

Terms 21 



Jfacultp of tfje iHusiit department 
190940. 



Rev. GEORGE W. LAY, Rector. 

Miss MARTHA A. DOWD, Director {gS/^Sic. 

(Graduate of St. Mary's, 1884; pupil of Kuersteiner, Sophus Wiig, Al- 
bert Mack. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1886 — ; Director of Music, 1908—) 

Miss HERMINE R. SCHEPER Piano, Harmony. 

(Graduate New England Conservatory; private student. New York 
City; teacher, Converse College, S. C, Hamilton Institute, Wash- 
ington ; Elizabeth College, N. C. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1907 — ) 

Miss BERTHA MAY LUNEY Piano, Organ. 

(Pupil of Hyatt and Becker at Syracuse University; Foote of Troy; 
and Tipton, of the Albany Cathedral. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1908—) 

R. BLINN OWEN Voice. 

(M. Mus., Detroit School of Music; pupil of Zimmermann, Mazurette 
Theo. Beach, of Detroit; Kreutschmar, in New York; teacher in 
Detroit and New York; private teacher in Bluefleld, W. Va., and 
Greensboro, N. C, 1906-09. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1909—) 

Miss ROSALIE F. WILLIAMS Piano. 

(A.B., and graduate and post-graduate in Music, Southern Presbyte- 
rian College (N. C); pupil of Moszkowski, in Paris, and of Stojow- 
ski, in New York; director of Music, Mary Washington School, 
Norfolk, 1907-08; private teacher, New York City, 1908-09. Teacher 
in St. Mary's, 1909—) 

Miss LILLIE M. NEIL Voice. 

(Pupil of Arthur Hubbard, in Boston, and of Juliani and Haslam, in 
Paris; private teacher in Boston; soprano soloist in various 
churches. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1909—) 

Miss MARJORY SHERWIN Violin. 

(Pupil of Davidson of Buffalo; pupil for three years of Sevcik in 
Prague; European certificate of scholarship of the first rank. Pri- 
vate teacher and concert soloist. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1909—) 

Miss SUSIE SIMMS BATTLE Piano. 

(Certificate in Piano, St. Mary's. 1904; teacher, Winthrop College, 
(S. C.) 1905-09. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1909—) 



Caienoar for 190940 

g>t£&ion of 1909-10 

September 13, Monday, .... Faculty assemble at St. Mary's. 
September 14, Tuesday, .... Registration and Classification of City 

Pupils. 
New Boarding Pupils, and Old Pupils 
needing examination, report by 7 
p. m. 
September 15, Wednesday, . . . Examinations preliminary to Classifica- 
tion. 
Old Pupils report by 7 p. m. 
Registration and Classification of Board- 
ing Pupils. 
September 16, Thursday, . . Advent Term Opens at 9 a. m. 
November 1, Monday, .... All Saints; Founder's Day; Holy Day. 
November 18, Thursday, . . . Second Quarter begins. 
December 17, Friday, 3 p.m. . . Christmas Recess begins. 
January 4, Tuesday. 7 p. m. . . School reassembles. 
January 19, Wednesday, .... Lee's Birthday; Half holiday. 
January 27, Thursday, . . . Easter Term Opens. 
February 9, Ash Wednesday; . . Lent begins; Holy Day. 

March 20, Palm Sunday; Bishop's visitation for 

Confirmation. 

March 24, Thursday Last Quarter begins. 

March 25, Good Friday; Holy Day. 

March 27, Easter Day. 

April 20, Wednesday Centenary of birth of Dr. Aldert Smedes, 

the Founder. 

May 5, Thursday, Ascension Day; Holy Day. 

May 12. Thursday Alumnee Day; 67th Anniversary of the 

opening of St. Mary's. 

May 22-26 Commencement Season. 

May 22, Sunday, 11.00 a.m. Commencement Sermon. 
May 23, Monday, 8.30 p. m. Elocution Recital. 
May 24, Tuesday, 4.30 p. m. Alumna Reunion. 

8.30 p. m. Annual Reception. 
May 25, Wednesday, 11.00 a.m. Class Day Exercises. 

3.30 p. m. Annual Meeting of the Trustees. 
8.30 p.m. Annual Concert 
May 26, Thursday, 11.00 a. m. Graduating Exercises. 
May 27, Friday Summer Holiday begins. 

No absence from the School is allowed at or near Thanks- 
giving Day, Washington's Birthday, or Easter. The only recess 
is at Christmas. 



department of Jllugtc 



General Remarks 

Music is both an Art and a Science. As such, 
the study of music is strong to train the mind, to 
touch the heart, and to develop the love of the beau- 
tiful. The importance of this study is being more 
and more realized by the schools, and its power felt 
as an element of education. ISTo pains are spared in 
preparing the best courses of study, methods of in- 
struction and facilities of work, in this department. 
Our country is becoming more and more a musical 
nation. 

It is the aim of the Music Department of St. 
Mary's to give students such advantages in technical 
training, in interpretative study, and in study of 
musical form and structure, as will enable them 
not only to develop their own talent, but also to hear, 
to understand, and to appreciate the beautiful in all 
music. 

The department is well equipped with a Miller, 
a Knabe, and a Steinway grand pianos, in addition 
to twenty-six other pianos and three claviers. The 
practice rooms are separate from the other buildings, 
and there is a beautiful Auditorium which seats six 
hundred and fifty people. 



8 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Organ pupils are instructed on an excellent two- 
manual pipe organ, with twenty stops, and a pedal 
organ. During the past year a Kinetic electric 
blower has been put in, which adds greatly to the 
convenience of instruction and practice. 

Courses of study are offered in Piano, Voice, Or- 
gan, and Violin. 

Concerts; anti Recitals 

For the purpose of acquiring confidence and be- 
coming accustomed to appearing in public, all music 
pupils are required to meet once a week in the Audi- 
torium for an afternoon recital. All music pupils 
take part in these recitals, which are open only to 
members of the School. 

Public recitals are given by the advanced pupils 
during the second term of the school year. 

Several Faculty recitals are given during the year 
and there are frequent opportunities for hearing 
music by artists, both at St. Mary's and in the city. 

%%i Cijotr 

No part of the School music is regarded as of more 
importance than the singing in Chapel. The whole 
student body attends the services of the Chapel and 
takes part in the singing. The best voices are chosen 
for the choir, which leads in all the Chapel music, 
and often renders special selections, and for this pur- 
pose meets once a week for special practice. The 
students in this way become familiar with chanting, 
with the full choral service, and with the best church 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 9 

music. Membership in the choir is voluntary, but 
pupils admitted to the choir are required to attend 
the weekly rehearsal. 

The whole school is expected to join in the music 
of the Chapel services, and for this reason a rehearsal 
of the whole school is conducted by the Rector after 
the service in the Chapel on Saturday evenings. At 
the Sunday evening services four-part anthems are 
frequently rendered, and the organ accompaniment 
is supplemented by an orchestra. 

Wi)t Cfjorus; Class 

The Chorus Class is not confined to the music 
pupils, but is open to all students of the School, ivith- 
out charge. This training is of inestimable value, 
as it gives practice in sight reading and makes the 
pupil acquainted with the best choral works of the 
masters — an education in itself. 

Care is taken not to strain the voices and attention 
is paid to tone color and interpretation. The beauty 
and effect of chorus singing is in the blending of the 
voices, and to sing in chorus it is not necessary to 
have a good solo voice. 

This branch of the musical training is always en- 
joyed by the students, as everybody likes to sing, and 
almost everybody can sing. 

From the members of the Chorus Class voices are 
selected by the Chorus Conductor for special work 
in a Glee Club. 

Membership in the Chorus Class and in the Glee 



10 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Club is voluntary. But pareuts are urged to re- 
quire this work from their daughters, if they are 
deemed fit for it by the Conductor. When, however, 
a pupil is enrolled in either, attendance at rehearsals 
is compulsory, until the pupil is excused by the 
Rector at the request of the parent. 

Gftje ©rcfjesitra 

Students of the violin, if sufficiently advanced, are 
required to take part in the Orchestra, which is in- 
cluded in the regular work of the department. The 
Orchestra meets once a week in the St. Mary's Audi- 
torium. It is composed of twenty-five members, stu- 
dents of the school and musicians from the city. The 
Orchestra gives three public recitals during the year, 
the programs being made up of selections from the 
best orchestral writers. The practice in ensemble 
playing is of great value to the students and the 
work of the orchestra is a source of interest and in- 
spiration to the life of the whole Music Department. 

delation to tfje &caoemtc department 

Studies in the Music Department may be pursued 
in connection with full academic work, or may be the 
main pursuit of the student. 

Study in the Music Department is counted to a 
certain extent toward the academic classification of 
regular pupils of the Academic Department. The 
theoretical studies count the same as Academic 
studies. The technical work is given Academic 
credit in accordance with certain definite rules. (See 
page 12.) ISTot more than three points credit in 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 11 

Music in one year, nor more than twelve points in 
all can be counted toward graduation from the Col- 
lege. 

Pupils specializing in music are, as a rule, ex- 
pected to take academic work along with their musi- 
cal studies. This is in accordance with the prevail- 
ing modern ideals in professional studies and the 
pursuit of special branches which require some gen- 
eral education in addition to the acquirements of a 
specialist. Pupils from the city may take lessons in 
music only. Certificates in Music are awarded only 
to pupils who have completed the required minimum 
of academic work. (See page 14.) This require- 
ment, which applies also to the Art and Elocution 
Departments, is designed to emphasize the fact that 
the school stands for thoroughness and breadth, and 
will not permit the sacrifice of a well-rounded edu- 
cation to over-development in any one direction. 

Clasatftcattcm tit iflustc 

Pupils entering the department are examined by 
the Director and assigned to a teacher. 

Thereafter, at the end of the first half year (or 
earlier if advisable), the pupil's classification in 
music is decided and she is enrolled in the proper 
class. This determines her degree of advancement 
in her musical studies. 

The examinations for promotion are held semi- 
annually. The marks in music indicate the quality 
of work, not the quantity. Promotion is decided by 
an examination, which shows both that the required 



12 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

amount of work has been done, and that it has been 
well done. 

Candidates for promotion or graduation, after sat- 
isfying the requirements in theoretical attainments, 
are required to perform certain stipulated programs 
before the Faculty of Music. 

To be classified in a given class in Music the pupil 
must have completed the entire work indicated below 
for the previous class or classes, and must take the 
whole of the work laid down for the class she wishes 
to enter. Instrumental or vocal work is not sufficient 
for enrollment in a given class without the theoretical 
work. 

Classification in music is entirely distinct from 
academic classification ; but the satisfactory accom- 
plishment of the full work of the Freshman or 
higher classes in music is counted toward academic 
graduation, provided the pupil is at that time a mem- 
ber of the College. 

Clashes tn Mu$k 

(It should be carefully noted that the names of the 
classes as here used are of musical standing only, 
and do not refer to the academic class of which the 
same pupil may be a member.) 

The regular course is designed to cover a period of 
four years from the time of entering the Freshman 
class, but the thoroughness of the work is considered 
of far more importance than the rate of advance. It 
may require two or more years to complete the work 
of the Preparatory class. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 13 

Preparatory. — Theory 1 and Course 1 in Piano, 

or in Voice, or in Violin. 
Freshman. — Theory 2 and Course 2 in Piano, or in 

Organ, or in Voice, or in Violin. 
Sophomore. — Theory 8 and Course 3 in Piano, or 

in Organ, or in Voice, or in Violin. 
Junior. — Harmony 1, Music History 1, Ensemble 

Work and Course Jf. in Piano, or in Organ, or in 

Foice, or in Violin. 
Senior. — Harmony 2, Music History 2, Ensemble 

Work and Course 5 in Piano, or in Organ, or 

in Voice, or in Violin. 

T%e Certificate of the Department is awarded 
under the following conditions : 

1. The candidate must have completed the work, theoretical 
and technical, of the Senior Class in the Music Department. 
(See above.) 

2. The candidate must have been for at least two years a 
pupil of the department. 

3. The candidate must have finished the technical work re- 
quired and have passed a satisfactory examination thereon, at 
least one-half year before the certificate recital which she must 
give at the end of the year. 

A Teacher's Certificate will be given in Piano, 
Organ, Violin or Voice, respectively, on the same 
conditions as the regular Certificate with the follow- 
ing modifications : 

1. The applicant does not have to complete her technical 
work before the end of the year. 

2. She does not have to give a public recital. 



14 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

3. She must demonstrate by practice during her last year 
her ability to teach the subject in which she applies for the 
Teacher's Certificate. 

The Diploma, the highest honor in the Music De- 
partment, is awarded to a pupil who has already re- 
ceived the Certificate and who thereafter pursues ad- 
vanced work in technique and interpretation for at 
least one year at the school. This work will be de- 
termined by the Musical Faculty, and the candidate 
must pass an examination satisfactory to the Faculty 
and give a public recital to be entitled to this award. 

gcabermc Crebtt for Jflustc Courses 

The theoretical work in Music is credited for 
academic classification as follows : 

Harmony I and II (one point each). 

Music History I and II (one point each). 

Total : 4 points. 

The foregoing studies are credited, like any acad- 
emic subject, only when the pupil has attained an 
average of 75 per cent on the recitations and exam- 
inations of the year. 

The technical work in Music is also credited for 
academic classification as follows : 

The completion at the School of the technical work 
in the Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, or Senior 
classes in Music will entitle the pupil to 3 points of 
academic credit for the work of each class thus com- 
pleted under the following conditions : 

( 1 ) Not more than three points may be earned in any one 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 15 

year in Piano, Voice, Violin, or Organ — whether one or more 
of these subjects is studied. 

(2) Not more than 12 points (one-fifth of the total amount 
required for graduation from the College) may be earned in 
all. 

(3) In order to be entitled to credit the pupil must be a 
member of the College. (Preparatory pupils may not count 
Music toward subsequent academic classification.) 

(4) In order to be entitled to credit for the technical work 
of a given class in music, the pupil must also have completed 
satisfactorily the theoretical work of that class. 

(5) Promotion to a given course in technical work is evi- 
dence of the satisfactory completion of the work of the previous 
course. 

West Jltimmum of ^cabemtc OTorfe Hequtreo for 
Certificates tn tfje jUlustc department. 

Candidates for Certificates in any subject in the 
College, the Music Department, the Art Department, 
or the Elocution Department, must have completed 
the following minimum of academic work. This 
work must have been done at St. Mary's, or be cred- 
ited by certificate or examination in accordance with 
the regular rules for credits. 

( 1 ) The A and B Courses in English, History, Mathematics, 
Science, and either Latin or French or German. 

(2) The C and D Courses in English and in History. 

( 3 ) Such other C and D Courses as will amount to "eight 
points" of Academic credit. 

For example: 

Mathematics C and D. 
or Latin C and D. 

or French C and D and German C and D. 
or Math. C and Science C and D. 
or Latin C and French C and D, etc. 



16 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

It will be observed that the above covers the requirements 
for entrance to the Freshman Glass of the Academic Depart- 
ment with "20 points" in college work. ("60 points" is the 
requirement for an Academic Diploma.) 

(For descriptions of these Academic Courses see 
Bulletin 15, which will be mailed on request.) 

W$t Courses 

The courses in Music are divided into Theoretical 

(including for convenience History of Music) and 

Technical. 

QCfjcoretital Courses 

Theory 1. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. 

Cummings, Rudiments of Music. 
Theory 2. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. 

Virgil, Exercises for the Study of Time and Practical In- 
struction in Ear Training ; Rhythm; Elementary Exer- 
cises in Sight Reading. 
Theory 3. (Miss Luney. ) One hour a week. 

The Scale. Shepherd, Simplified Harmony. Ear-training 

continued. Sight Reading. Kitter, Musical Dictation. 

Harmony 1. (Miss Scheper.) One hour a week. One point* 

Emery, Lessons in Harmony. 
Harmony 2. (Miss Scheper.) One hour a week. One point* 

Emery, Lessons in Harmony ( continued ) . 
History op Music 1. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. One 
point* 

Parry, History of Music; Elson, Club Programs of All 
Nations. 
History of Music 2. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. One 
point* 

Pauer, Musical Form. 



*These points count on the academic standing of a pupil, provided she is 
already enrolled as a full member of a college class. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 17 

Httdtnita.1 Courses 

In general, each course corresponds to a year's 
work for a pupil with musical taste. But even faith- 
ful work for some pupils may require more than a 
year for promotion. 

iPtano 

Course I. — All major scales in chromatic order, hands to- 
gether, quarter note M.M. 100. Harmonic and melodic 
minor scales, hands separate, eighth note M.M. 100. Major 
arpeggios, hands separate, quarter note M.M. 80. Studies, 
Duvernoy 176; Kohler op. 157, 242; Heller op. 47; Burg- 
muller op. 100. Easier sonatinas by Lichner, Clementi, 
Kuhlau, etc. Read at sight first-grade piece. 

Course II. — Major scales, hands together, quarter note M.M. 
116. Harmonic and melodic minor scales, hands separate, 
quarter note M.M. 100; together M.M. 80. Arpeggios, 
major and minor, hands separate, quarter note 92. 
Duvernoy op. 120; Czerny 636; Le Couppey op. 20; Heller 
op. 46; Bach Little Preludes and Fugues. One major 
scale in octaves, hands separate, eighth note M.M. 120. 
Turner Octaves op. 28. Vogt Octaves. Sonatinas Kuhlau, 
Diabelli, etc. Read at sight second-grade piece. 

Course III. — Harmonic and melodic minor scales, hands to- 
gether, quarter note M.M. 116. Arpeggios, major and 
minor, hands together, quarter note M.M. 92. Major 
scales in octaves in chromatic order, hands separate, quar- 
ter note M.M. 72. Three scales in thirds, sixths, tenths, 
and contrary motion, quarter note M.M. 100. Czerny 299; 
Berens op. 61; Kranse op. 2; Heller op. 45; Bach Two-Part 
Inventions. Easier Sonatas Clementi, Mozart, Haydn, 
Beethoven. Read at sight third-grade piece. 

Course IV. — Minor scales, hands together, quarter note M.M. 
132. Major and minor arpeggios, hands together, M.M. 
116. Three minor (melodic and harmonic) scales in in- 
tervals M.M. 100. Major scales in octaves, hands to- 



18 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

gether M.M. 72. Scale of C in double-third, hands separ- 
ate, eighth note M.M. 100. Bach French Suites, Three- 
part Inventions. Cramer Etudes. Clementi "Gradus ad 
Parnassum" sonatas. Read at sight a third-grade piece 
or play a simple accompaniment. 
Course V. — Six major scales and six minor scales (three har- 
monic and three melodic), in intervals M.M. 116. Arpeg- 
gios, dominant and diminished 7ths, hands together, M.M. 
116. All major scales in double thirds, hands separate, 
M.M. 72. Advanced studies in interpretation in prepara- 
tion for public recital. Public recital. 

Course 1. — Breathing, tone placement and tone development. 
Sight singing. Studies by Wm. Shakespeare, a pupil of 
the great Francesco Lamperti. Sieber, eight-measure 
studies. Concone Marchesi, Bordogni. Nava, Elements of 
Vocalization. Simple Songs and Ballads. 

Course 2. — Management of breath, sight singing. Studies by 
Lamperti, Solfeggio Concone Vocalises. Bordogni Easy 
Vocalises, Marchesi Vocalises, Bighnini Exercises, Vaccai 
Method. Modern songs and easy classics. 

Course 3. — Spiker, Masterpieces of Vocalization, Books 1-2. 
Mazzoni Vocalises. Concone, Vocalises. Lamperti, Studies 
in Bravura. Viardot, An Hour of Study 1. Classic songs 
and arias. 

Course 4. — Otto Vocalizzi, Vannini. Bona, Rhythmical Articu- 
lation; Viardot, An Hour of Study 2. Spiker, Master- 
pieces of Vocalization, Books 3-4. Manuel Jarcia, Studies. 

Course 5. — Classic Songs. Concert, Oratoria-Opera-Colorature- 
Singing; Roulades, and embellishment. Public recital. 

Practical instruction is given from the first rudi- 
ments to the highest difficulties of the instrument, 
both in its use as an accompaniment to the different 
styles of Church music, as well as in the various 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 19 

methods of the employment of the organ as a solo 
instrument. 

Opportunity is given to acquire confidence and 
experience by practice in accompanying the services 
of the Chapel, beginning with the easier work at the 
daily services of the School and going on through the 
accompaniment of anthems and more elaborate serv- 
ices on Sunday. 

Course 1. — The organ pupil must have enough work in piano 
to enable her to enter the Freshman class in piano. This 
constitutes the preparatory work for the .organ course. 

Course 2. — Clemens' Organ School. Bach's Eight Short Pre- 
ludes and Fugues. Easy Preludes and Fugues by Merkel 
and Batiste. Horner's Pedal Studies Book. 

Course 3. — Buck's Pedal Studies. Bach's Preludes and Fugues. 
Light Solos for the Organ by Wely, Batiste, DuBois. 
Studies by Buck, Guilmant, Lemare. Service playing. 

Course 4. — Bach's Greater Fugues. Carl's Master Studies 
( perhaps put these in third year ) . Sonatas by Mendels- 
sohn, Widor, Guilmant, Wolstenholme. Service playing. 

Course 5. — Standard Overtures of the Old and Modern Mas- 
ters. Service playing. Public recital. 

An advanced piano pupil might do the work of 
two of the above courses in one year. 
Violin 

The course in Violin is indicated in the summary 
given below. Pupils of the department, if suffi- 
ciently advanced, are required to take part in the 
Orchestra, which is included in the regular work of 
the department. 

Course 1. — Exercises and studies by Heming, David (Part I), 
Dancla, Hofman op. 25, Wohlfahrt op. 45. Easy solos by 
Hauser, Sitt, Dancla, Papini, etc. 



20 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Course 2. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, David (Part 
II), Sevcik op. 6, Kayser op. 37. Solos adapted to the 
needs of pupils. 

Course 3. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, David (Part 
II), Sevcik op. 6, op. 8, op. 9, Dont, Kayser op. 20, 
Kreutzer. Solos by DeBeriot, Dancla, etc. Modern com- 
posers. 

Course 4. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, Sevcik, Rode, 
Kreutzer. Sonatas, Concertos by Viotti, Spohr, DeBeriot, 
etc. 

Course 5. — Exercises and studies by Sevcik, Mazas, Fiorillio. 
Sonatas, Concertos. Public recital. 

A knowledge of piano, sufficient to play second 
grade pieces at least, is required in the case of pupils 
in the last two courses. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 21 

TERMS PER ANNUM 

All regular fees are due and must be paid quarterly 
in advance. 

Pupils are required to register at the beginning of 
each half-year and no pupil will be allowed to regis- 
ter until all past fees have been paid. 

Pupils are not received for less than a half-year, 
or the remainder of a half-year. As a matter of sim- 
ple justice to the School, parents are asked to give 
ample notice of intention to withdraw a pupil at the 
end of the half-year. 

No deduction is made for holidays or for absence or 
withdrawal of pupils from school, except in cases of 
protracted sickness. In cases of absence or with- 
drawal from protracted sickness the school and the 
parent will divide losses for the remainder of the 
half-year. 

A deposit of $5.00 is required of all boarding 
pupils at the time of filing application, as a guaran- 
tee for holding place. This deposit is in no case re- 
turned, but on the entrance of the pupil is credited 
to her regular account. 

Regular Charges 

Boakding Pupils. — The regular charge for the 
school year is $281 for pupils in the dormitory ; $291 
for pupils in rooms. This includes all living ex- 
penses and regular school fees. Charges for Music, 
Art, and Elocution are extra. There is no extra 
charge for languages. Rates are given below. 



22 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

The regular charge includes: 

Board, light, fuel, alcove $200 

Academic Tuition 50 

Laundry 20 

Contingent, Medical and Library Fees 11 

$281 
Room-rent (if in rooms) 10 

$291 

jfflusic department 

Piano, Organ, or Violin $50 

If from the Director 60 

Vocal 60 

Use of Piano for practice 5 

Use of Organ for practice 10 

This charge is for one hour's practice each school day during 
the session. Additional practice is charged for at the same 
rates. 

Theory of Music, History of Music, or Harmony, $10 

Music pupils are required to take one of these three sub- 
jects. 

For further details concerning charges, or any 
other matter connected with the School as a whole, 
consult Bulletin 13 — General Information, copies 
of which may be had on request. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 

"I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of 
St. Mary's School, Raleigh, North Caroliina, their 
successors and assigns, absolutely and forever (the 

property given), in trust that 

it shall be used for the benefit of said school, in the 
discretion of said Trustees, for building, improve- 
ment, equipment, or otherwise" 

(or) 
"in trust to be invested and the income derived 
therefrom to be used for the benefit of said school in 
such manner and for such purposes as to the Trustees 
may seem best." 



M. Jfflarp'g 

Cfje Btocesian B>d)ooi (for gtrte) of tfje Caroltnasi 



The 68th session of St. Mary's School begins Sep- 
tember 16, 1909. 

Easter Term begins January 20, 1910. 



For Bulletins and other information, address 
Rev. GEORGE W. LAY, 

Rector. 



EDWARDS & BROUGHTON PRINTING CO., RALEIGH, N. G. 



Gtontar, 1009 fMb* ft £fa. 15 

BULLETIN 




DETAILS OF THE 

Aratomtr Ifpartmrnt 
IHustr SrpartmMtt 
Art l*partm*nt 
Huaineas Hrpartment 



TERMS 



$nbltsbe& (fpuartwltj btj &t. fSanj's grbnal 

&aletgt), Jlortf) Carolina 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. C, as Second Class -Matter 
Under Act of Congress op July 16, 1894 



&t Jfflarp's g>rf)ool 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Founded in 1842 by Rev. Aldert Smedes, D.D. 



Wttabtr, 1000 BnlSB I, £fa. 15 

BULLETIN 




DETAILS OF THE 

Ara&emlr lUparttupnt 
JRustr Sppartmpnt 
Art Sppartment 
Husmess Hrpartmntt 



TERMS 



■publish^ (ipuarterlg bg Bt. iKarg'a grhool 

&aleigf), Jlortf) Carolina 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. C, as Second Class Matter 
Under Act of Congress op Jult 16, 1894 



RALEIGH, N. C. 
Founded in 1842 by Aldert Smedes, D.D. 



Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector. 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal. 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK. . .Secretary and Business Manager. 



M. Jfflarp'S gdjool pullettn 

Series! I. dumber 15. details of tfje i£>rf)ool Work 

This number of the Bulletin is intended especially 
for the information of pupils of St. Mary's, — past, 
present, and prospective, — and of school principals 
and other teachers who may be preparing pupils for 
entrance ; but also for the general public who are 
now or may be interested in the announcements. 

This number of the Bulletin contains : 

PAGE. 

The Calendar for 1909-10 4 

The Board of Trustees 5 

The Faculty and Officers for 1909-10 6 

The Work of the Departments 9 

Academic Department 9 

Upper Preparatory 9 

The College 10 

Admission 11 

Classification 15 

Graduation 16 

Awards 17 

Regular Courses 21 

Courses in Detail 26 

History 27 

English 29 

Foreign Languages 32 

Mathematics 38 

Natural Science 40 

Philosophy 42 

Bible Study 44 

Music Department 45 

Elocution Department 58 

Art Department 59 

Business Department 62 

TERMS 65 

Requirements for Admission to Freshman Class 19 



Calendar for 1909=10 

g>eSssion of 1909=10 

September 13, Monday, .... Faculty assemble at St. Mary's. 
September 14, Tuesday, .... Registration and Classification of City 

Pupils. 
New Boarding Pupils, and Old Pupils 
needing examination, report by 7 
p. m. 
September 15, Wednesday, . . . Examinations preliminary to Classifica- 
tion. 
Old Pupils report by 7 p. m. 
Registration and Classification of Board 
ing Pupils. 
September 16, Thursday, . . Advent Term Opens at 9 a. m. 
November 1, Monday, .... All Saints; Founder's Day; Holy Day. 
November 18, Thursday, . . . Second Quarter begins. 
December 17, Friday, 3 p.m. . . Christmas Recess begins. 
January 4, Tuesday, 7 p. m. . . School reassembles. 
January 19, Wednesday, .... Lee's Birthday; Half holiday. 
January 27, Thursday, . . . Easter Term Opens. 
February 9, Ash Wednesday: . . Lent begins; Holy Day. 

March 20, Palm Sunday; Bishop's visitation for 

Confirmation. 

March 24, Thursday Last Quarter begins. 

March 25, Good Friday; Holy Day. 

March 27, Easter Day. 

April 20, Wednesday Centenary of birth of Dr. Aldert Smedes. 

the Founder. 

May 5, Thursday, Ascension Day; Holy Day. 

May 12. Thursday, Alumnfe Day; 67th Anniversary of the 

opening of St. Mary's. 

May 22-26 Commencement Season. 

May 22, Sunday, 11.00 a. m. Commencement Sermon. 
May 23, Monday, 8.30 p. m. Elocution Recital. 
May 24, Tuesday, 4.30 p.m. Alumnse Reunion. 

8.30 p. m. Annual Reception. 
May 25, Wednesday, 11.00 a.m. Class Day Exercises. 

3.30 p. m. Annual Meeting of the Trustees. 
8.30 p. m. Annual Concert. 
May 26, Thursday, 11.00 a. m. Graduating Exercises. 
May 27, Friday Summer Holiday begins. 

No absence from the School is allowed at or near Thanks- 
giving Day, Washington's Birthday, or Easter. The only recess 
is at Christmas. 



QTfje Poarb of tErusitees 



tEljf ©istjops 

Rt. Rev. Jos. Blount Cheshire, D.D., Chairman Raleigh, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Robt. Strange, D.D Wilmington, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Wm. Alexander Guerry Charleston, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner Asheville, N. C. 

Clerical anb Hap HZtix&ttea 

NORTH CAROLINA. 
Rev. M. A. Barber, Raleigh. Rev. J. E. Ingle, Henderson. 

*Rev Dr. R. H. Lewis, Raleigh. 

Col. Chas. E. Johnson, Raleigh. Hon. R. H. Battle, Raleigh. 

Mr. W. A. Erwin, Durham. Mr. D. Y. Cooper, Henderson. 

(until 1915.) (until 1912.) 

EAST CAROLINA. 
Rev. R. B. Drake, D.D.,Edenton. Rev. T. P. Noe, Wilmington. 

Mr. Frank Wood, Edenton. Mr. Geo. C. Royall, Goldsboro. 

(until 1915.) (until 1912.) 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Rev. T. T. Walsh, Yorkville. Rev. L. G. Wood, Charleston. 

Mr. P. T. Hayne, Greenville. Mr. T. W. Bacot, Charleston. 

(until 1911.) (until 1911.) 

ASHEVILLE. 

Rev. W. H. Hardin, Gastonia. Rev. McNeely DuBose, Morganton. 

Hon. Wm. A. Hoke, Lincolnton. Mr. F. A. Clinard, Hickory, 

(until 1915.) (until 1912.) 

Cxecutibe Committee 

Rt. Rev. J. B. Cheshire, D.D., Chairman. 
Hon. R. H. Battle. Dr. R. H. Lewis. 

Col. Chas. E. Johnson. Mr. W. A. Erwin. 

Mr. George C. Royall. 

£s>ecretarp anb ^Treasurer 

Dr. K. P. Battle, Jr. 
♦Vacant. 



W$z Jfacultp ana ®iiittx& of ftt jftlarp'tf 
19094910 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector. 

Miss ELEANOR W.THOMAS Lady Principal- 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Secretary. 



tKfjc glcabemic department 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Bible, Ethics, and Greek. 

(A.B., Yale, 1882; B.D., General Theological Seminary, 1885; master 
in St, Paul's School, Concord, N. H., 1888-1907. Rector of St. Mary's, 
1907—) 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS English and Literature. 

(A.M., College for Women, S. C, 1900; summer student, Columbia 
University, N. Y., 1905; instructor, Greenville College, S. C, 1904 
Instructor in St. Mary's, 1900-1904; 1905—) 

WILLIAM E. STONE History and German. 

(A.B., Harvard, 1882; principal, Eder.ton, N. C, Academy, 1900-02; 
master in Porter Academy, Charleston, 1902-1903. Instructor in St. 
Mary's, 1903—) 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Science. 

(A.B., Washington College, Md., 1897; A.M., 1898: graduate student 
Johns Hopkins University, 1900. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1903—) 

Miss MARGARET M. JONES Mathematics. 

(Graduate, St. Mary's, 1896; student, University N. C, 1900: student, 
Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1906-1907; teacher, New 
York City High Schools, 1907-08. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1897-1899; 
1900-1906; 1908—) 

Miss GEORGINA KELLOGG French. 

(A.B., Smith, 1904; student in Europe, 1904-06; instructor, Noble 
Institute, Ala., 1906-1907. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1908—) 

Miss ANNA L. DUNLAP Latin. 

(Cornell, 1900-02; A.B., A.M., Leland Stanford, 1904; teacher, Remsen 
High School. 1904-1905; Sayre (Pa.) High School, 1905-1906; Miss 
Fuller's School, Ossining, N. Y., 1906-08. Instructor in St. Mary's, 
1909- ) 

Miss FRANCES T. TOWERS English. 

(A.B., Vassar, 1906; teacher, Washington, D. C, 1906-1907: Goldsboro 
(N. C.) High School, 1907-09. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1909—) 

Miss LILA N. BROWN Expression and Physical Culture. 

(Wells College; graduate, Emerson College of Oratory, 1902; stu- 
dent, Sargent's School of Gymnastics, 1904-05. Instructor in St. 
Mary's, 1909—) 

Miss KATE McKIMMON Primary School. 

(Student and teacher at St. Mary's since 1861.) 

Miss MABEL A. HORSLEY Preparatory Work. 

(Graduate Powell's School, Richmond, Virginia. Assistant in St. 
Mary's, 1907—) 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 7 

Miss SALLIE HAYWOOD BATTLE Assistant" 

( Graduate, St. Mary's, 1909. ) 

Miss JULIA L. McINTYRE Assistant. 

( Graduate, St. Mary's, 1909. ) 

iilus'tr. department 

Miss MARTHA A. DOWD, Director J P^ 110 ' Th ^ v J' . 

(History of Music. 

(Graduate of St. Mary's, 1884; pupil of Kuersteiner. Sophus Wiig. Al- 
bert Mack. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1886 — ; Director of Music, 1908 — ) 

Miss HERMINE R. SCHEPER Piano, Harmony. 

(Graduate New England Conservatory; private student. New York 
City; teacher, Converse College, S. C; Hamilton Institute, Wash- 
ington ; Elizabeth College, N. C. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1907—) 

Miss BERTHA MAY LUNEY Piano, Organ. 

(Pupil of Hyatt and Becker at Syracuse University: Foote of Troy; 
and Tipton, of the Albany Cathedral. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1908 — ) 

Miss ROSALIE F. WILLIAMS Piano. 

(A.B., and graduate and post-graduate in Music. Southern Presbyte- 
rian College (N. C); pupil of Moszkowski, in Paris, and ofStojow- 
ski, in New York; director of Music. Marv Washington School, 
Norfolk, 1907-08; private teacher, New York City, 1908-09. Teacher 
in St. Mary's, 1909—) 

Miss SUSIE SIMMS BATTLE Piano. 

(Certificate in Piano, St. Mary's. 1904; teacher, Wiiithrop College, 
(S. C.) 1905-09. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1909—) 

R. BLINN OWEN Voice. 

(M. Mas., Detroit School of Music: pupil of Zimmermann, Mazurette, 
Theo. Beach, of Detroit; Kreutschmar. in New York; teacher in 
Detroit and New York; private teacher in Bluerield, W. Va., and 
Greensboro, N. C, 1906-09. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1909—) 

Miss LILLIE M. NEIL Voice. 

(Pupil of Arthur Hubbard, in Boston, and of Juliani and Haslam. in 
Paris ; private teacher in Boston ; soprano soloist in various 
churches. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1909 — ) 

Miss MARJORY SHERWIN Violin. 

(Pupil of Davidson of Buffalo; pupil for three years of Sevcik in 
Prague; European certificate of scholarship of the first rank. Pri- 
vate teacher and concert soloist. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1909—) 

9rt department 

Miss CLARA I. FENNER, Director { BeTgr^c^ 1111118 '' 

( Graduate Maryland Institute, School of Art and Design, special student 
Pratt Institute, 1905 ; special student in Paris, 1907. Director of Art, St. 
Mary's, 1888-96 ; 1902—) 



8 ST. MARYS SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

elocution department 

Miss LILA N. BROWN, Director Expression. 

(Harcourt Place Seminary, Gambier, O; Wells College. Aurora, N. Y. 
Graduate, Emerson College of Oratory, Boston. 1902; instructor in 
Elocution and Physical Culture, New Lynne Institute, O., 1902-04: 
student, Dr. Sargent's School of Gymnastics. Cambridge, Mass., 
i90-t-05; director of Elocution and Physical Culture, Alabama Cen- 
tral College, Tuscaloosa, 1905-09; instructor, University of Ala- 
bama Summer School. Directorof Expression, St Mary's, 1909— ) 

Jiusiness jDepartment 

Miss LIZZIE H. LEE, Director. , J Stenography, Typewriting, 

) Bookkeeping. 

(Director of the Department, 1896—) 

Miss JULIET B. SUTTON Assistant. 

(Instructor in St. Mary's, 1898—) 



(^fftcerS, 190940 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector. 



Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal. 

Mrs. KATHARINE LEAKE Matron. 

Miss EVA HARDESTY Housekeeper 

Miss LOLA E. WALTON Matron of the Infirmary. 

Dr. A. W. KNOX School Physician. 



ERNEST CRUIKSHAXK Business Manager. 

Miss LIZZIE H. LEE Bookkeeper. 

Miss JULIET B. SUTTON Stenographer. 

Mrs. MARY IREDELL Agent of the Trustees. 



WORK OF THE DEPARTMENTS 

gcabemtc department 

I. The Primary School; II. The Preparatory 
School; III. The College. 

This department consists of the Primary School ; 
the Preparatory School ; and the College. 

The Primary School and the first two years of the 
Preparatory School are maintained entirely on ac- 
count of the local demand. They are not intended 
for boarding pupils (who must be ready to enter the 
third yea - " of the Preparatory School, the first High 
School year), and are not treated of in this Bulletin. 
Any information desired will be furnished on applica- 
tion. 

The Preparatory School covers a four year course 
corresponding to the last two years of a Grammar 
School and the first two years of a High School (7th 
to 10th grades inclusive) of the highest standard. 

33pper ^Preparatory 

The last two years of the Preparatory School and 
first two years of the College cover the work of the 
best High Schools and the courses are numbered for 
convenience A, B, C and D. See pages 21-22. 

The course in the Upper Preparatory is closely pre- 
scribed and each pupil is expected to adhere to it. It 
is intended to prepare for the College and is also de- 
signed to serve as a school for those who, while unable 
to take a college course, intend to enter the Business 
Department and prepare themselves for employment 



10 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

in the many avenues of commercial life now open to 
women . 

Admission to the Upper Preparatory classes may 
be allowed provisionally on certificate without exami- 
nation ; but all candidates are advised to bring or 
send certificates and also take such examinations as 
are necessary. School standards differ so materially 
that much time is lost in the effort to classify candi- 
dates satisfactorily on certificates alone, since this in- 
evitably results in many cases in failure to succeed in 
the class that is attempted at first. 

&f)e College 

The first two years of the present College course are 
intended to complete the work of a first-class high 
school, and the pupil is limited in well-defined lines 
and not allowed to specialize or take elective work 
except within narrow limits ; in the last two years the 
courses are conducted on college lines, and the pupil, 
under advice, is permitted in large measure to elect 
the lines of work best suited to her taste and ability. 

At entrance into the College every pupil is expected 
to select some definite course and afterwards to keep 
to it. This requirement is designed to keep pupils 
from that vacillating course which puts an end to seri- 
ous work, and can never really accomplish anything. 
It is not intended to hinder those who, coming to take 
a special course in Music, Art or Business, desire to 
occupy profitably their spare time in some one or 
more of the courses of the College. 

Care must be exercised in this selection to choose 
courses that will secure the necessary aggregate of 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 11 

sixty points and that cover the requirements specified 
on page 16. 

Those who may possibly enter some higher institu- 
tion after graduation at St. Mary's should note care- 
fully that the courses in the College should be chosen 
with reference to the requirements of the higher 
classes of the institution to which they expect to go ; 
and that the choice should be made as early as possi- 
ble. A properly arranged course at St. Mary's will 
admit to the Junior Class of the highest northern col- 
leges. But the course that might lead to the award 
of a diploma at St. Mary's might not cover the sub- 
jects necessary for entrance to the advanced class of 
any given college of higher grade. 

lUbmts&ton to tfje Jf resfjman Class 

It is preferred that all applicants should bring Cer- 
tificates showing the work done at their last school 
along with a Certificate of Honorable Dismissal and 
that they should also be examined. This prevents 
mistakes and disappointment later on and insures bet- 
ter classification. Certificates alone will, however, be 
accepted provisionally for entrance to the Freshman 
Class without examination from all institutions 
known to us to be of the proper standard. Such cer- 
tificates must state specifically that all work required 
for entrance has been well done, naming text-books, 
number of pages, and the grade or mark received, to- 
gether with the length of each recitation and the time 
spent upon each branch. 



12 ST. MARY' 8 SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Parents and teachers will please remember that, in 
order to be of any service whatever, a certificate must 
cover the above points. A statement that a pupil is well- 
behaved and industrious and has received a grade of 90 
in "English" is of no use whatever in enabling the School 
to decide what work has been accomplished. 

Parents are also urged, wherever possible, to ob- 
tain certificates of work clone before the close of the 
school year. Teachers are not to blame for inaccu- 
racy in certificates made out from memory when ab- 
sent on their summer vacations. Such certificates 
are, however, of little value. 

gtomis&ton to gobanceti Clashes 

In order to be admitted to work higher than that 
of the Freshman Class, students must first be ad- 
mitted to the Freshman Class in the manner detailed 
above, and must also, as a rule, be examined in the 
work of the College class or classes which they wish 
to anticipate. That is, a candidate for the Junior 
Class, for exanrple, must be examined in the studies 
of the Freshman and Sophomore years. If this is 
done unconditional credit by points, counting toward 
the 60 points needed for graduation, is at once given. 

No exception is made to the above requirement of 
examination in Mathematics Cl (Advanced Algebra) 
or in English D (Advanced Rhetoric and Composi- 
tion) and in one or two other subjects where the 
higher courses in these subjects do not sufficiently test 
the pupil's previous knowledge. Though it is again 
urged that pupils always be examined for any such 
advanced classes and thus obtain unconditional credit 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 13 

at once, the certificates from schools well known to 
be of entirely equivalent standard will be accepted 
conditionally in other subjects provided the student 
continues the same studies in the higher classes 
after entering St. Mary's and thus obtains as many 
points for work in each study done at St. Mary's 
as the number of points for which she desires certi- 
ficate credit. This conditional credit on certificate 
will be given her unconditionally only after she has 
obtained credit by successful work in the advanced 
classes. For example, a pupil entering M Eng- 
lish will be entitled to eight points of certificate 
credit in English conditionally (that is, for the 
C English and D English work). When she has 
completed the work of M English she receives four 
points for this work done at St. Mary's and is at the 
same time given unconditionally four points of the 
eight points already credited conditionally on certifi- 
cate. When she completes the work of X English she 
in like manner receives four points for that work and 
the other four points already credited conditionally 
on certificate are then credited unconditionally, thus 
making 16 points in English for the two years' work 
— eight points for work done at the school and eight 
points for the previous work certified to and which 
was accepted conditionally. 

Blanks for these certificates will be sent upon ap- 
plication. A candidate for admission may be ac- 
cepted in some subjects or in parts of subjects and 
not in all. 



14 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Certificates when accepted are credited condition- 
ally at their face value. The pupil is placed in the 
class which her certificate gives her the right to enter. 
If she does satisfactory work during the first month, 
she is given regular standing in the class ; if at the 
end of the first month her work has proved unsatis- 
factory, she is either required to enter the next lower 
class or may be given a trial for one month more. 

All candidates for admission who can not show the 
proper certificates for preparatory work, will be ex- 
amined to determine, their proper classification. 

Specimen examination questions in any subject 
will be furnished on request ; and principals who are 
preparing pupils for St. Mary's will be furnished 
the regular examination papers at the regular times, 
in January and May, if desired. 

Certificates are urgently desired in all cases, 
whether the candidate is to be examined or not. 

gtestgnment to Classes 

(Please note that this section treats only of assignment to 
specific classes for purposes of recitation in a single given 
subject. Classification, by which a pupil becomes a member 
of a College Class — Freshman, Sophomore, etc., depends on 
points for all work done, and is treated of in the succeeding 
section.) 

Regular Students. — The Eector or his represen- 
tative will advise with pupils in the selection of their 
courses of study. The parents of every pupil enter- 
ing the school should communicate by letter with the 
Eector as to this matter. Pupils are urged to pursue 
the regular course. The courses are so arranged that 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 15 

a pupil well prepared at entrance can devote attention 
to Music, Art, or Elocution without detriment to her 
regular class work. 

Special Students. — Those who desire to take 
academic work while specializing in the Departments 
of Music, Art, Expression, or Business, will be per- 
mitted to do so and will be assigned to such studies in 
the Academic Department as may be desired and for 
which they are fitted. The number of hours of 
Academic Work along with the time spent on the spe- 
cialties (Music, etc.) should be sufficient to keep the 
pupil well occupied. 

Clarification 

In order to graduate and receive the School diplo- 
ma a pupil must receive credit for 60 points in cer- 
tain specified subjects. Even though a student does 
not expect to graduate she is classified as Freshman, 
Sophomore, etc., according to the amount of work 
done in the College course. The classification is ar- 
ranged as follows : 

A student admitted to the Freshman Class with 
condition in not more than one subject is ranked as a 
Conditioned Freshman. 

If admitted without condition she is ranked as a 
Freshman. 

A student with 15 'points of unconditional credit is 
ranked as a Sophomore. 

A student with SO points of unconditional credit 
is ranked as a Junior. 

A student with 1/.2 points of unconditional credit 



16 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

is ranked as a Senior, provided that she takes that 
year with the approval of the School sufficient points 
counting toward her graduation to make the 60 points 
necessary. 

It is proposed, beginning with 1910-11, to add the 
following requirement : 

A pupil entitled to be ranked in any way with a given class 
under the above conditions must also take work sufficient to 
give her the prospect of obtaining enough points during the 
year to entitle her to enter the next higher class the following- 
yea r. 

(graduation 

The course leading to graduation from the College 
is outlined later in stating the work of each year. 
The course is closely prescribed during the first two 
years (through the Sophomore year). In the last 
two years the pupil is allowed a broad choice of elec- 
tives. 

The requirements for graduation may be briefly 
summed up as follows : 

( 1 ) The candidate must have been a pupil in the depart- 
ment during at least one entire school year. 

(2) The candidate must have obtained credit for all the 
required courses of the four years of the College and sufficient 
additional credit to make at least 60 points. 

(3) The candidate must have earned at least the amount 
of credit specified below, in the subjects indicated : 

English: 12 points. 

Mathematics: 5 points. 

History: 6 points. 

Science : 4 points. 

Philosophy: 6 points. 

Foreign Languages (Latin, French, or German in any 

combination) : 15 points. 
Total: J/S points. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 17 

(4) Not more than 20 points will be counted for class- 
work in any one year ; not more than 15 points will be counted 
altogether in any one subject (Latin, French and German 
being considered as separate subjects) ; and not more than 12 
points will be counted for technical work done in the Depart- 
ments of Music, Art, and Elocution. 

(5) The candidate must have made up satisfactorily any 
and all work in which she may have been "conditioned" at 
least one-half year before the date at which she Avishes to 
graduate. 

( b" ) The candidate must have made formal written announce- 
ment of her candidacy for graduation during the first quarter 
of the year in which the diploma is to be awarded; and her 
candidacy must have been then passed upon favorably by the 
Rector. 

(7) The candidate must have satisfactorily completed all 
"general courses'' which may have been prescribed; must have 
maintained a satisfactory deportment; and must have borne 
herself in such a way as a pupil as would warrant the authori- 
ties in giving her the mark of the school's approval. 

gtoarbs; 

The St. Mary's Diploma is awarded a pupil who 
has successfully completed the full academic course 
required for graduation as indicated above. 

An Academic Certificate will be awarded to 
pupils who receive a Certificate or Diploma in Music 
or Art, on the conditions laid down for graduation 
from the College, except that 

( 1 ) The minimum number of points of academic credit re- 
quired will be 35 points, instead of 60 points. 

(2) These points will be counted for any strictly academic 
work in the college. 

(3) No technical or theoretical work in Music or Art will 

be credited toward these 35 points. 

This Certificate is here limited to those who receive Certificates or Diplomas 
in Music or Art. Any other student of the School in the Session of 1909-10 will 
be given the Certificate on the conditions that have heretofore prevailed, pro- 
vided she makes application before the close of this session. 
9 



18 8T. MART'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

gtoarbg in ©tfter ^Departments 
For academic requirements for certificates or di- 
plomas in Music or Art, see under those departments. 
Commencement honors 
Honors at graduation are based on the work of the 
last two years, the true college years. 

The Valedictorian has the first honor ; the Salu- 
tatorian has the second honor. The Essayist is 
chosen on the basis of the final essays submitted. 
WQt pernor &oU 
The highest general award of merit, open to all 
members of the School, is the Honor Roll, announced 
at Commencement. The requirements are : 

( 1 ) The pupil must have been in attendance the entire ses- 
sion and have been absent from no duty at any time during 
the session without the full consent of the Rector, and without 
lawful excuse. 

(2) She must have had during the year a full regular 
course of study or its equivalent, and must have carried this 
work to successful completion, taking all required examina- 
tions. 

(3) She must have maintained an average of "Very Good," 
(90 per cent) or better, in her studies. 

(4) She must have made a record of ''Excellent" (less than 
two demerits) in Deportment, in Industry, and in Punctuality. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory 
bearing in the affairs of her school life during the year. 

3Tfce iJiies iflebal 

The Niles Medal for General Excellence was 

instituted by Rev. Charles Martin jSTiles, D.D. in 

1906. It is awarded to the pupil who has made the 

best record in scholarship and deportment during the 

session. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 19 

The medal will be awarded to the same pupil only 
once. 

The requirements for eligibility are: 

( 1 ) The pupil must have taken throughout the year at 
least "15 points" of regular work; and have satisfactorily 
completed this work, passing all required examinations. 

(2) The pupil must have been "Excellent" in deportment. 

(3) The pupil must have taken all regular general courses 
assigned and have done satisfactory work in them. 

(4) The pupil must be a regular student of the College 
Department. 

Cfje Ikquiremente for jgUmuggion to tfje Jf resfjman 
Claste of ^>t. iHarp'g ^cfjool 

In English and Literature. — A good working 
knowledge of the principles of English Grammar as 
set forth in such works as Buehler's Modern Gram- 
mar, with special attention to the analysis and con- 
struction of the English sentence. 

Knowledge of elementary Rhetoric and Composi- 
tion as set forth in such works as Maxwell's Writing 
in English, or Hitchcock's Exercises in E?iglish Com- 
position. 

Candidates are expected to have had at least two 
years' training in general composition (themes, let- 
ter-writing, and dictation). 

Subjects for composition may be drawn from the 

following works, which the pupil is expected to have 
studied: Longfellow's Evangeline and Courtship of 
Miles Standish (or Tales of a Wayside Inn) ; selec- 
tions from Irving's Sketch Book (or Irving's Tales 
of a Traveler); Hawthorne's Twice Told Tales; 
Scott's Ivanhoe (or George Eliot's Silas Marner). 



•20 .ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Iii Mathematics. — Arithmetic complete, with 
special attention to the principles of percentage and 
interest. Elementary Algebra complete and Ad- 
vanced Algebra through Quadratic Equations. 

In Histoky. — The History of the United States 
complete as laid down in a good high school text ; the 
essential facts of English History ; the essential facts 
of Greek and Roman History. 

In Latin. — A sound knowledge of the forms of 
the Latin noun, pronoun and verb, and a knowledge 
of the elementary rules of syntax and composition as 
laid down in a standard first-year book and begin- 
ner's composition (such as Bennett's First Year' Latin 
and Bennett's Latin Composition). The first three 
books of Caesar's Gallic War. 

In Ekenci-i or German. — A first-year course lead- 
ing to the knowledge of the elements of the grammar 
and the ability to read simple prose. 

In Science. — The essential facts of Physical 
Geography and Physiology as laid down in such texts 
as Tarr's Physical Geography and Martin's Human 
Body. 

The pupil must meet the requirements in English, History, 
Mathematics, Science and one foreign language. 

Science may be omitted if tico foreign, languages are offered. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 21 



Cfje Regular &caoemtc Course 

(Full detailed description of the course outlined below will be found on pages 
26-14.) 

The letter given with each course is the name of the course 
( as English A, French C ) . The number following the letter 
gives in the Preparatory Department the number of periods 
of recitation weekly. 

In the college work a number after the Easter term only 
indicates the number of points for both terms work, and that 
no credit is given for less than the work of the whole year : 
while a number after each term indicates the number of points 
for such term alone and that the course for that term is a 
separate one for which credit is given separately. 

?Hpper ^Preparatory WLovk 

THIRD YEAH. 

Advent Term. Easter Term. 

English: Grammar, A, 5. English: Grammar, A, 5. 

History: English, A, 5. History: American, A, 5. 

Mathematics: Algebra, A, 5. Mathematics: Arithmetic, A, 5. 

Latin: First Book, A, 5. Latin: First Book, A, 5. 

Science: General, A, 3. Science: Geography, A, 3. 

All pupils are also required to take Bible Study, Drawing, Reading, and 
Physical Culture. 
French A may also be taken. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Advent Term. Easter Term. 

English: Elem. Rhetoric, B, 5. English: Elem. Rhetoric, B, 5. 

History: Greek, B, 4. History: Roman, B, 4. 

Mathematics: Algebra, B, 5. Mathematics: Algebra, B, 5. 

Latin: Caesar, B, 4. Latin: Csesar, B, 4. 

Science: Physical Geography, Science: Physiology, B, 3. 
B, 3. 

All pupils are also required to take Bible Study, Drawing, Reading, and 
Physical Culture. 
French B or German B mav also be taken. 



22 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 



College Wioxk 

A member of any College class must take the required 
courses of that class and enough elective courses to make 
altogether fifteen points of credit for the year. 

In addition, there are required the following general courses, 
which, however, do not count on the points of credit: 

In the Freshman Class — Bible Study, Reading, and Spelling. 

In the Sophomore Class — Bible Study, Spelling and Current 
History. 

In the Junior and Senior Classes — Bible Study and Current 
History. 

jfresftman Class 

BEQUIKED COURSES. 

Advent Term. Easter Term. 

English: Rhetoric, C. English: Literature, C, 4. 

Mathematics: Algebra, C, 3. Mathematics: Geometry, C, 2. 

ELECTIVE COURSES. 

History: English, C, 2. Science: Botany, C, 2. 

Latin: Cicero, C. Latin: Cicero, C, 4. 

French: Grammar, C. French: Readings, C, 2. 

German: Grammar, C. German: Readings, C. 2. 

ibophomore Class 

REQUIRED COURSES. 

Advent Term. Easter Term. 

English: Studies, D, 2. English: American Lit., D, 2. 

Science: Chemistry, D, 2. History: American, D, 2. 



Mathematics: Geom., 
Latin : Virgil, D. 
French: Modern, D. 
German: Modern, D. 



ELECTIVE COURSES. 

D, 1%. Mathematics: Trigonom.,D, 1%. 
Latin: Virgil, D, 4. 
French: Modern, D, 2. 
German: Modern, D, 2. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 



23 



STuntor Class 



ALL ELECTIVE. 



Advent Term. 
English: Poetics, M, 2. 
History: Middle Ages, M. 
Philosophy: Civics, M, 1. 
Mathematics: Analytics, M. 
Latin : Historians, M. 
French: Modern, M. 
German: Modern, M. 



Easter Term. 
English: Essayists, M, 2. 
History : Middle Ages, M, 2. 
Philosophy: Economics, M, 1. 
Mathematics: Analytics, M, 3. 
Latin: Poets, M, 3. 
French: Modern, M, 3. 
German: Modern, M, 3. 



Senior Class 



Advent Term. 
English: Hist. Lang., N, 2. 
History: Modern, N. 
Philosophy: Ethics, N, 1. 

Psychology, N. 
Latin: Philosophy, N. 
French : Classics, 1ST. 
German: Classics, N. 
Mathematics: Calculus, N. 



Easter Term. 
English: Shakespeare, N. 2. 
History: Modern:, N, 2. 
Philosophy: Evidences, N, 1. 

Psychology, N, 2. 
Latin: Drama, N, 3. 
French: Classics, N, 3. 
German: Classics, N, 3. 
Mathematics: Calculus, N, 3. 



Note: — The Theoretical courses in Music and Art may be 
counted as elective in any college class, and the technical work 
of the proper grade in either Music, Art, or Elocution may be 
counted in any college class as an elective for three points. 
But only one such subject may be so counted. 

Failure in the Bible course for the year will deprive the 
pupil of one of the points gained in other subjects. 

General Courses; 

The theory of St. Mary's being that a well-rounded 
education results in a developing of the best type of 
Christian womanhood, certain general courses as out- 
lined below have been prescribed for all pupils. 



24 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

•Reabing 

Believing that at the present day too little attention 
is paid to the art of clear, forceful, intelligent read- 
ing, St. Mary's requires all her pupils, except Juniors 
and Seniors, to take practical training to this end. 
Spelling anb Composition 
An hour each week is devoted to training the same 
pupils in overcoming defects of spelling, and letter- 
writing. 

Current J^istorj* 

Pupils of the Senior, Junior and Sophomore years 
meet once a week for the discussion of current topics, 
current literature, etc. This exercise is intended to 
lead to a discriminating reading of current publica- 
tions and to improve the powers of conversation. 
JJormal Substruction 

Pupils who announce their intention at the begin- 
ning of the Senior year to devote themselves to teach- 
ing after their graduation, will be given special as- 
sistance to this end, both in instruction and in prac- 
tice. 

JSible g>tubp 

All pupils are required to take the prescribed course 

in Bible Study, which is given one hour a week. It 

is intended to afford a knowledge of the English 

Bible, of the history and literature of the Biblical 

books, and of their contents, and is not dogmatic in its 

teachings. 

:Pfipsfical Culture 

All pupils not excused on the ground of health are 
required to take the required exercises in physical cul- 



8T. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 25 

ture, which are thoroughly practical and are intended 
to train pupils in the art of managing their bodies, 
in standing, walking, using their limbs, breathing, 
and the like. The exercise is most wholesome and 
the training imparts to the pupils suggestions about 
their health which will be most useful to them 
throughout life. 



26 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 



THE COURSES IN DETAIL 

General Hitatemtrtts 

The courses are here lettered systematically. It is 
important to note and consider the letter of the course 
in determining credits or planning a pupil's work. 

"0" Courses are preliminary. Where a pupil has not had 
sufficient previous preparation for the regular courses, she will 
be required to take this "0"' work before going on into "A." 

"A" Courses are the lowest regular courses, and are taken 
in the Third Year of the Preparatory School. 

"B" Courses are taken in the Fourth Year (last year) of the 
Preparatory School. 

The U A" and "B" Courses in English, History, Mathematics 
and Science and one foreign language for their equivalents), 
must have been finished satisfactorily by a pupil before she is 
eligible for admission to the College. 

"C" and "D" Courses are taken ordinarily in the Freshman 
and Sophomore Years. In English, Mathematics, Latin, French 
and German, the "C" Course must be taken before the pupil 
can enter the "D" Course. 

"M" and "X" Courses are ordinarily taken in the Junior or 
Senior Years. Pupils are not eligible to take these courses 
until they have finished the "C" and "D" Courses of the same 
subjects. (See special exceptions before each subject.) 

"X" Courses are special courses not counting toward gradu- 
ation. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 27 

Mr. Stone. 

Courses O, A, and B are Preparatory, and the knowledge ob- 
tained in them is required before a pupil can enter the Col- 
lege. Courses C. D, M, and N are College courses. 

Candidates for graduation must take at least 6 points in 
History. 

Candidates for certificates must take at least Courses C 
and D. 

Course O. — 5 half-hours a week. American His- 
tory. A grammar school course in United States 
History, impressing the leading facts and great 
names. 

Course A. — 5 half-hours a week. (1) English 
History. (2) American History. A constant 
aim of this course will be to impress the pupil so 
thoroughly with the leading facts of English and 
American history that she will have a solid frame- 
work to be built upon later in her more advanced 
studies in History, English, and Literature. 

Coman & Kendall, Short History of England; Chambers, 
Higher History of the United States. 

Course B. — 4 hours a week. Ancient History. 
( 1 ) First half-year : Greece ; ( 2 ) Second half-year : 
Rome. The course in Ancient History makes a 
thorough study of the ancient world. The pupil is 
sufficiently drilled in map work to have a working 
knowledge of the ancient world ; the influence of some 
of the great men is emphasized by papers based on 
outside reading, for instance: Plutarch's Lives. Se- 
lections from Homer are read in class. 

West, Ancient World; Ivanhoe Historical Note-Book, Part 
III. 



28 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week, first half-year. (2 
points.) English History. In this course empha- 
sis is laid on the development of constitutional gov- 
ernment particularly with its bearing on United 
States History. The Ivanhoe JSTote Books are used 
for map work. From time to time papers are re- 
quired on important events and great men. 

Higginson & Channing, English History for Americans. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week, second half-year. (2 
points.) American History. In II. S. History 
the text-book gives a clear and fair treatment of the 
causes leading to our war with Great Britain ; to the 
War Between the States ; aud of present day ques- 
tions, political, social and economic. 
Adams and Trent, History of United States. 

Course M. — 2 hours a week. (2 points.) Me- 
dieval History. In Medieval and Modern History 
the pupil is given a clear view of the development of 
feudalism ; of monarchic states ; of the history of the 
Christian Church ; of the Reformation ; of the growth 
of democracy, and of the great political, social and 
religious questions of the present day, with some 
special reference work in the library. 

West, Modern History ; Ivanhoe Note-Booh, Part IV. 

Course 1ST. — 2 hours a week (2 points.) Modern 
History. A continuation of Course M. Same 
methods. 

West, Modern History; Ivanhoe Note-Booh. Part IV. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 29 

Qftje €nglisif) language anfo Utterature 

Miss Thomas. Miss Towers. 

All pupils at entrance will be required to stand a written 
test to determine general knowledge of written English. 

Courses 0, A, and B are Preparatory and the knowledge 
obtained in them is required before a pupil can enter a higher 
course. 

Candidates for graduation must take Courses C and D and 
at least 4 points from Courses M and N. 

Candidates for certificates must take Courses C and D. 

Course O. — (Preliminary.) 5 half -hours a week. 
(1) Grammar. Text-book: Woodley & Carpenter, 
Foundation Lessons in English Grammar. (2) Read- 
ing of myths (Guerber's stories), legends, other stories 
and poems ; memorizing of short poems. 

Course A. — 5 half-hours a week. (1) Grammar 
and Composition. Text-book: Buehler, Modern 
Grammar. (2) Literature: Longfellow's Evan- 
geline and Courtship of Miles Standish; Irving' s Leg- 
end of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle; Haw- 
thorne's short stories ; Bryant's poems ; Whittier's 
Snow Bound; memorizing of poems. 

Course B. — 5 hours a week. (1) Grammar. 
Review of English grammar ; analysis and parsing of 
more difficult constructions, with special study of 
verb-phrases and verbals. (2) Composition : Study 
of principles of composition ; narrative, descriptive, 
expository themes ; reproductions ; letter-writing ; use 
of models. (3) Literature: Scott's Ivanhoe and 
Lady of the Lake; George Eliot's Silas Marner; 
Hawthorne's stories ; short poems of Tennyson ; Low- 
ell's Vision of Sir Launfal. 

Hitchcock, Exercises in English Composition. 



30 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Coue.se C. — 4 hours a week. (Jf. points.) (1) 
Rhetoric and English Composition : Frequent oral 
and written exercises leading to correctness in use of 
words, structure of sentences, arjd ability to put into 
practice general principles of composition. (2) 
English Liteeatuke : Study of a history of Eng- 
lish literature ; careful study of a few classics ; read- 
ing of narrative and descriptive works in prose and 
poetry with class discussion and oral and written re- 
ports on reading done. 

(1) Baldwin, Writing and Speaking; (2) Tappan, Eng- 
land's Literature ; Palgrave's Golden Treasury; Julius Gcesar 
(possible substitution of another play of Shakespeare) ; 
selected poems of Goldsmith, Gray, Cowper, Burns, Byron; 
one or two novels. 

Couese T). — 4: hours a week. Peeeequisite : 
Course C. (1) Rhetoric., Composition, and Lit- 
erature, first half year. (2 points.) Especial at- 
tention to paragraph and to narrative and descriptive 
writing ; frequent use of literary models ; themes 
weekly or twice a week. (2) American Litera- 
ture, second half year. (2 points.) Study of history 
of American literature and of selected works ; use of 
library, with oral and written reports on reading 
done. 

( 1 ) Espenshade's Essentials of Composition and Rhetoric; 
specimens of narration and description ; one play of Shake- 
speare; (2) Newcomer's American Literature; Hawthorne's 
House of the Seven Gables; Emerson's American Scholar; 
Poe's Poems and Tales. 

Course Ml. — 4 hours a week, first half year. (2 
points.) Prerequisite: Course D. English 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 31 

Poetry. Study of English versification; studies 
from English poets, chiefly those of Romantic era. 

Gummere's Hand-Book of Poetics; Tennyson's Idylls of the 
King; selected poems of Milton, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shel- 
ley, Keats. 

Course M2. — 4 hours a week, second half year. 
(2 points.) Prerequisite: Course D. English 
Essayists. Study of Addison's Sir Roger de Cov- 
erly Papers; Macaulay's Essay on Addison; Carlyle's 
Essay on Burns; Burke's Speech on Conciliation. 
Reading of other essays ; themes mainly of an exposi- 
tory and argumentative character. 

Course 1ST1. — 4 hours a week, first half year. (2 
poiiits.) Prerequisite. Course D. History of the 
English Language, with illustrative reading. Essay 
writing. 

Lounsbury, History of the English Language. 

Course N2. — 4 hours a week, second half year. 
(2 points.) Prerequisite: Course D. The Eng- 
lish Drama; Shakespeare. Rise of the drama 
studied by means of lectures and outside reading; 
careful study of two or three of Shakespeare's plays, 
with reading of others ; essay writing. 

The Arden Edition of Shakespeare's works; Dowden's Shake- 
speare Primer. 



32 ST. MARY'S .SCHOOL BULLETIN 



jforctgn languages; 

Candidates for graduation must take at least 15 points in 
foreign languages. 

Jfrenri) 

Miss Kellogg. 

Course A. — (Preliminary.) 5 half-hours a week. 
A course for young children. The study of the lan- 
guage begun without a text-book. Careful drill in 
pronunciation. The learning of the names of objects 
and the forming of sentences. Reading in Guerber, 
Conies et Legended I. 

Course B. — (Preliminary.) 5 half-hours a week. 
The study of the language begun. Careful drill in 
pronunciation. Reading, grammar, dictation, con- 
versation. 

Guerber, Conies et Legendes I ; Brooks, Chardenal, Complete 
French Course; Super, French Reader. 

Course C. — 5 half-hours a week. (2 points.) 
Prerequisite : French B. Elementary French I. 
Systematic study of the language. Grammar, read- 
ing, conversation. Careful drill in pronunciation ; 
the rudiments of grammar (inflection, use of per- 
sonal pronouns, common adverbs, prepositions, and 
conjunctions ; order of words ; elementary rules of 
syntax) ; the reading of from 100 to 175 duodecimo 
pages of graduated texts, with constant practice in 
translating into French easy variations of the sen- 
tences read (the teacher giving the English), and in 
reproducing from memory sentences previously read ; 
writing French from dictation. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 33 

Brooks, Chardenal, Complete French Course; Fontaine, 
Liore de Lecture et de Conversation; Gruerber, Contes et 
Legendes II; Halevy, L'Abbe Constantin. 

Course D. — 5 half-hours a week. (2 points.) 
Elementary French II. Continuation of previous 
work ; reading of from 250 to 400 pages of easy mod- 
ern prose in the form of stories, plays, or historical 
or biographical sketches ; constant practice, as in the 
preceding year, in translating into French easy varia- 
tions upon the text read ; frequent abstracts, some- 
times oral and sometimes written, of portions of the 
text already read ; writing French from dictation ; 
continued drill upon the rudiments of grammar, with 
constant application in the construction of sentences ; 
mastery of the forms and use of pronouns, pronomi- 
nal adjectives, of all but the rare irregular verb forms, 
and of the simpler uses of the conditional and sub- 
junctive. 

Eraser and Squair, Abridged French Grammar ; Labiche and 
Martin, Le Voyage de M. Perrichon ; Lamartine, Jeanne d' 
Arc; La Brete, Hon Oncle et Hon Cure; Merimee, Colomba; 
or equivalents. 

Course M.— o hours a week. (S points.) In- 
termediate French. The reading of from 300 to 
500 pages of standard French of a grade less simple 
than in Course D, a portion of it in the dramatic 
form ; constant practice in giving French para- 
phrases, abstracts or reproductions from memory of 
selected portions of the matter read ; the completion 
of a standard grammar ; writing from dictation ; 
study of idioms. 



34 ST. MARYS SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Fraser and Squair, Abridged French Grammar; Bouvet, 
French Syntax and Composition ; Loti, Pecheur cVIslande; 
Sand, La Mare an Diable; Daudet, Lettres de mon Moulin; 
Bo\ren, Modern French Lyrics; and equivalents. 

Course X. — 3 hours a week. (8 points.) Ad- 
vanced French. The rapid reading of from 300 to 
500 pages of French poetry and drama, classical and 
modern, only difficult passages being explained in 
class ; -writing of numerous short themes in French ; 
study of syntax ; history of French literature ; idioms. 
Duval, Eistoire de la Literature francaise; Hugo, Ruy 
Bias; Corneille's dramas; Bostand's Cyrano de Bergerac; 
Kenan's, Souvenirs d'enfance et de jeunesse ; Moliere's plays; 
or equivalents. 

German 
Mr. Stoxe. Miss Joxes. 

The courses in German are exactly parallel to the 
corresponding courses in French. The amount of 
work required in each course and the methods are 
approximately the same. The text-books and litera- 
ture used are as follows : 

Course B. — (Preliminary). 5 half-hours a week. 
Study of the Language begun. 
Collar, First Year German; Zehokke"s Der Zerbrochene Krug. 

Course C — 5 half-hours a week. (2 points.) 

Prerequisite : German B. Elementary German I. 

Joynes-Meissner, German Grammar; Storm's Immensee; 

Hillern's Holier als die Kirche; Heyse's L'Arrabiata; selected 

poetry. 

Course D. — 5 half-hours a week. (2 points.) 
Elementary German II. Continuation of Course 
C. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 35 

Joynes-Meissner, German Grammar (completed) ; Benedix' 
Der Prozess ; Arnold's Fritz auf Ferien; Fulda's TJnter Vier 
Augen; Wildenbrach's Der Letzte; Schiller's Wilhelm Tell; 
selected poetry. 

Course M. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) In- 
termediate German. 

Freytag's Die Journalisten; Schiller's Die Jiingfrau von Or 
leans; Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm ; Scheffel's Der Trompeter 
von Sakkingen ; Uhland's poems. 

Course X. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Ad- 
vanced German. 

, German Literature ; Goethe's Hermann und Doro- 
thea; Lessing's Nathan der Weise ; Schiller's Wallenstein; 
Scheffel's Ekkehard. 

lUtitt 

]\IlSS DUNLAP. 

Pupils well grounded in English may complete Courses 
and A in a single session. 

Course 0. — 5 half-hours a week. (Preliminary 
Course.) Study of the simple inflectional forms ; 
marking of quantities ; reading aloud ; translation of 
sentences from Latin to English, and from English 
to Latin; translation at hearing; easy connected 
Latin and English. 

Bennett, First Year Latin; Kirtland, Ritchie, Fabulae 
Faciles ( Perseus, Hercules ) . 

Course A. — 5 half-hours a week. Elementary 
Latin I. Review and continuation of work of Course 

O ; thorough review of forms with use of note-book ; 

composition and derivation of words ; systematic 

study of syntax of cases and verb. 

Bennett, First Year Latin, (rapidly reviewed) ; Ritchie's 
Fabulae (completed) ; Rolfe, Yiri Romae ; Bennett, Latin 
Grammar. 



36 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Course B. — 5 half hours a week. Elementary 
Latin II. Caesar. Continuation of preceding 
work ; study of the structure of sentences in general, 
and particularly of the relative and conditional sen- 
tence, indirect discourse, and the subjunctive; sight 
translation ; military antiquities. 

Bennett, Cresar (Books I-IV) ; Bennett, Latin Grammar; 
Bennett, Latin Writer. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week. (Jf. points.) Ele- 
mentary Latin III.— Cicero ; continued systematic 
study of grammar ; study of Roman political institu- 
tions ; short passages memorized ; prose and poetry at 
sight. 

Bennett, Cicero (four orations against Catiline, Archias, 
Manilian Law) ; Daniell, New Latin Composition (Part II). 

Course D. — 4 hours a week. (Jf points.) Ele- 
mentary Latin IV. Virgil; continuation of pre- 
ceding courses; prosody (accent, general versifica- 
tion, dactylic hexameter). 

Bennett's Virgil's JEneid (Books I-VI); Bennett, Latin 
Grammar; Daniell-Brown, New Latin Composition. 

Course M. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) In- 
termediate Latin I. The public and private life 
of the Romans as told in the Latin. Literature. 
Prose composition. Recitations; occasional explana- 
tory lectures; parallel reading. (1) First half- 
year: The Roman Historians; (2) Second half- 
year: The Roman Poets. 

(1) Melhuish, Cape, Livy (Books XXI, XXII) ; Allen, Taci- 
tus'' Germania; (2) Page, Horace's Odes (Books I, II) ; 
Baker, Horace's Satires and Epistles (selected) ; (1, 2) Gilder- 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 37 

sleeve-Lodge, Latin Composition; Peek and Arrowsmith, Roman 
Life in Prose and Verse; Wilkins, Roman Antiquities. 

Course jST. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) In- 
termediate Latin II. Continuation of Course M. 
(1) First half-year : Roman Philosophy; (2) Sec- 
ond half-year : Roman Drama. 

(1) Shuckbui'gh, Cicero's de Senectute and de Amicitia ; (2) 
Elmer, Terence's Pkormio; (1, 2) Gildersleeve-Lodge, Latin 
Composition ; Peck and Arrowsmith, Roman Life in Prose and 
Verse. 

(greek 
Miss Duxlap. 
Greek and Latin are considered as equivalents in all courses. 
Greek may be substituted in place of Latin, in whole or in 
part. Greek courses are offered by the school when there is 
a sufficient number of pupils to justify it. 

Course B. — 5 half-hours a week. Element- 
ary Greek I. First year Greek. Special atten- 
tion to the mastery of forms and principal construc- 
tions. 

Ball, Elementary Greek Booh; Maemillan, Greek Reader. 

Couese 0. — 4 hours a week. (If. points.) Ele- 
mentary Greek II. Grammar ; reading ; composi- 
tion ; sight-reading. Methods as in Latin. 

Goodwin, Greek Grammar; Goodwin, Xenophon's Anabasis 
(four books) ; Jones, Greek Prose Composition. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week. (If. points.) Ele- 
mentary Greek III. Continuation of Course C. 

Goodwin, Greek Grammar; Seymour, Homer's Iliad (4,000 
lines) ; Daniell, Greek Prose Lessons. 



38 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

ittatfjematics 

Miss Jones. 

Certificate credit will not be given for Course C, 1 (Algebra). 
The pupil must either stand examination or take the subject 
at St. Mary's. 

Candidates for graduation must at least have credit for 
C Mathematics. 

Candidates for certificates must have at least finished 
Course B. 

Course A. — 5 periods a week. (1) Arithmetic. 
A thorough review of the fundamental principles. 
Special attention to common and decimal fractions 
and percentage and its applications. (2) Algebra. 
The study of elementary Algebra, as laid down in a 
first-year text-book. 

(1) Milne, Standard Arithmetic; (2) Wells, First Steps in 
Algebra. 

Course X. — 5 periods a week. Complete Arith- 
metic. Commercial problems ; review of common 
and decimal fractions ; metric system ; mental arith- 
metic ; percentage and the applications ; mensuration. 
Not counted for graduation. Intended especially for 
Business pupils. 

Course B. — 5 periods a week. Algebra through 
Quadratics. The four fundamental operations ; fac- 
toring ; fractions ; complex fractions ; linear equa- 
tions (numerical and literal, containing one or more 
unknown quantities) ; problems depending on linear 
equations; radicals (square root and cube root of 
polynomials and of numbers) ; exponents (fractional 
and negative) ; quadratic equations (numerical and 
literal). 

Wells, New Higher Algebra. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 39 

Course C. — 5 hours a week. Prerequisite: 
Course B. (1) First half-year: Algebra, from 
Quadratics. (3 points.) Quadratic equations with 
one or more unknown quantities ; problems depend- 
ing on quadratic equations ; equations in quadratic 
form ; the binomial theorem for positive integral ex- 
ponents ; ratio and proportion ; arithmetical and ge- 
ometrical progressions ; numerous practical problems 
throughout. (2) Second half-year: Plane Geome- 
try (complete). (2 points.) The usual theorems 
and constructions ; the solution of numerous original 
exercises, including loci problems ; applications to the 

mensuration of lines and plane surfaces. 

(1) Wells, New Higher Algebra; (2) Wentworth, Plane 
Geometry (Revised) (or) Wells, Essentials of Geometry. 

Course D. — 3 hours a week. Prerequisite: 
Course C. (1) First half-year: Solid Geometry. 
(1 1-2 points.) The usual theorems and constructions; 
the solution of numerous original exercises, includ- 
ing loci problems ; applications to the mensuration of 
surfaces and solids. (2) Second half-year: Plane 
and Spherical Trigonometry. (1 1-2 points.) 
Definitions and relations of the six trigonometric 
functions as ratios ; circular measurement of angles, 
proofs of the principal formulas and the transforma- 
tion of trigonometric expressions by the formulas ; 
solution of trigonometric equations of a simple char- 
acter ; theory and use of logarithms ; solution of right 
and oblique triangles, and practical applications, in- 
cluding the solution of right spherical triangles. 

(1) Wells, Essentials of Geometry (or) Wentworth, Solid 
Geometry (Revised): (2) Wells, Complete Trigonometry. 



40 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Course M. — 3 hours a week. Prerequisite: 
Course D. (1) First half-year: Advanced Alge- 
bra. (1 1-2 points.) Permutations and combina- 
tions ; complex numbers ; determinants ; undeter- 
mined coefficients ; numerical equations of higher de- 
gree, logarithmic and exponential equations, and 
the theory of equations necessary to their treatment 
(Descartes' rule of signs; Horner's method). (2) 
Second half-term : Analytical Geometry. (1 1-2 
points.) Introduction to the analytical geometry of 
the plane and of space. Proof of formulas ; original 
examples. 

(1) Wells, Neto Higlier Algebra; (2) Tanner and Allen, 
Analytic Geometry. 

Course X. — 3 hours a week. Prerequisite : Course 
M. Calculus. (S points.) Elementary course in 
the differential and integral calculus. 
Osborne, Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Natural Science 

Me. Ceuikshaxk. 

Candidates for graduation must take at St. Mary's at least 
one biological and one physical science. 

The certificates of candidates for admission to the Freshman 
Class must show clearly the amount of work done in Physical 
Geography and Physiology. Unless enough has been done the 
pupil will be required to take these courses at St. Mary's. 

Courses Ca and Cb are given in alternate years; likewise 
Courses Da and Db. 

M and N Courses are offered when required. 

Course A. — 3 half-hours a week. General Ele- 
ments of Science. A simple general treatment of 
the elementary facts of the various branches of natu- 
ral science. 

Bert, First Steps in Scientific Knowledge. 



ST. MARYS SCHOOL BULLETIN. 41 

Course Bl. — 3 half -hours a week, first half-year. 
Physical Geography. The study of a standard 
text-book to gain a knowledge of the essential princi- 
ples and of well-selected facts illustrating those 
principles. 

Tarr, Principles of Physical Geography. 

Course B2. — 3 half hours a week, second half- 
year. Physiology. An elementary study of the 
human body and the laws governing its care. 

Martin, Human Body (Elementary Course). 

Course Ca. — 4 hours a week, second half-year. 
General Zoology. (2 points.) A general study of 
the principal forms of animal life, their structure, 
development, geographical distribution and adapta- 
tion, reproduction, etc. Individual laboratory work. 

Davenport, Introduction to Zoology. 

Course Cb. — 4 hours (3 hours recitation and dem- 
onstration and one double hour laboratory practice) a 
week, second half-year. Elementary Botany (2 
points.) The general principles of anatomy and 
morphology, physiology, and ecology, and the natural 
history of the plant groups and classification. Indi- 
vidual laboratory work ; stress laid upon diagram- 
matically accurate drawing and precise expressive de- 
scription. 

Bailey, Botany. 

Course Da. — 4 hours (2 hours recitation and dem- 
onstration, 2 double hours laboratory) a week, first 
half-year. Elementary Chemistry. (2 points.) 
(a) Individual laboratory work, comprising at 



42 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

least thirty-five exercises taken from the list recom- 
mended by the "Committee on Chemistry." (b) In- 
struction by lecture-table demonstration, used as a 
basis for questioning upon the general principles in- 
volved in the pupil's laboratory investigations, (c) 
The study of a standard text-book, supplemented by 
the use of many and varied numerical problems, to 
the end that a pupil may gain a comprehensive and 
connected view of the most important facts and laws 
in elementary chemistry. 

Kemsen, Introduction to Chemistry ( Briefer Course ) ; Reni- 
sen, Chemical Experiments (or) Newell, Descriptive Chemis- 
try (Parts I and II). 

Course Db. — 4 hours (2 hours recitation and dem- 
onstration, 2 double hours laboratory work) a week. 
Elementary Physics. An exact parallel to the 
course in Chemistry (Course Da) in scope and 
method. 

Carhart and Chute, High .School Physics. 

|Di)ll0S0pf))» 

Mr. Lay. Mr. Stone. 

The following courses are intended for general all-round 
development and are required of all candidates for graduation 
or certificate. 

Philosophy Ml. — 2 hours a week, first half-year. 
(1 'point.) Civil Government. The leading facts 
in the development and actual working of our form 
of government. 

Fiske, Civil Government. 

Philosophy M2 — 2 hours a week, second half- 
year. (1 point.) Political Economy. The prin- 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 43 

ciples of the science made clear and interesting by 
their practical application to leading financial and 
industrial questions of the day. 
Ely and Wicker, Political Economy. 

Philosophy RT1. — 2 hours a week, first half-year. 
(1 point.) Ethics. A general outline of the foun- 
dation principles, especially as applied to the rules 
of right living. 

Jannet, Elements of Morals. 

Philosophy W2. — 2 hours a week, second half- 
year. (1 point.) Evidences. Christianity por- 
trayed as the perfect system of ethics, and as the 
most complete evidence of itself. 

Fisher, Manual of Natural Theology; Manual of Christian 
Evidences. 

Psychology N". — 2 hours a week throughout the 
year. (2 points.) A brief introduction to the sub- 
ject, the text-book being supplemented by informal 

lectures and discussions. 
Halleek, Psychology. 



44 ST. MARYS SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

$tble g>tubj> 

Mr. Lay. Mr. Stone. 

Both Boarding and Day Pupils are required to 
take a one-hour course in Bible Study. On account 
of the varying lengths of time spent at the School 
by different pupils, the variation of the classes which 
they enter, and the difference in knowledge of the 
subject shown by members of the same college class, 
it is difficult to arrange these courses in as syste- 
matic a way as might be desired. 

Pupils are therefore assigned to Bible classes 
partly on the ground of age and partly on the ground 
of the amount of work done and the length of time 
spent at the School. 

There are four divisions pursuing separate courses. 
These courses are designed to cover the Old and jSTew 
Testament and the History of the Bible in two years ; 
and then to give a fuller knowledge of these subjects 
to those pursuing a longer course at the School. 

The instruction is partly by lectures accompanied 
by the use of a uniform edition of the Bible (with 
references, dictionary, maj)s, etc.,) as a text-book; 
and partly by Instruction Books. 

All Boarding Pupils are also required to take a 
half-hour course in one of the Sunday classes. These 
courses are on the Bible, or the Prayer Book, or 
Church Historv. 



,S7 T . MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 45 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



Miss Martha A. Dowd Director. 

tElje Jfacultp 

Miss Williams Piano. 

Miss Scheper Piano. 

Miss Battle Piano. 

Miss Down Piano. 

Miss Luney Organ. 

Mr. Owen Voice. 

Miss Neil Voice. 

Miss Sherwix Violin. 

Miss Dowd History of Music, Theory. 

Miss Scheper Harmony. 

Mr. Owen Conductor of Chorus and Orchestra. 



General Bemarfes; 

Music is both an Art and a Science. As such, 
the study of music is strong to train the mind, to 
touch the heart, and to develop the love of the beau- 
tiful. The importance of this study is being more 
and more realized by the schools, and its power felt 
as an element of education. No pains are spared in 
preparing the best courses of study, methods of in- 
struction and facilities of work, in this department. 
Our country is becoming more and more a musical 
nation. 

It is the aim of the Music Department of St. 
Mary's to give students such advantages in technical 



4G ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

training, in interpretative study, and in study of 
musical form and structure, as will enable them 
not only to develop their own talent, but also to hear, 
to understand, and to appreciate the beautiful in all 
music. 

The department is well equipped with a Miller, 
a Knabe, and a Steinwav grand pianos, in addition 
to twenty-six other pianos and three claviers. The 
practice rooms are separate from the other buildings, 
and there is a beautiful Auditorium which seats six 
hundred and fifty people. 

Organ pupils are instructed on an excellent two- 
manual pipe organ, with twenty stops, and a pedal 
organ. During the past year a Kjmetic electric 
blower has been put in, which adds greatly to the 
convenience of instruction and practice. 

Courses of study are offered in Piano, Voice, Or- 
gan, and Violin. 

Concert* ano Centals; 

For the purpose of acquiring confidence and be- 
coming accustomed to appearing in public, all music 
pupils are required to meet once a week in the Audi- 
torium for an afternoon recital. All music pupils 
take part in these recitals, which are open only to 
members of the School. 

Public recitals are given by the advanced pupils 
during the second term of the school year. 

Several Faculty recitals are given during the year 
and there are frequent opportunities for hearing 
music bv artists, both at St. Marv's and in the city. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 47 

®fje Cfjotr 

]STo part of the School music is regarded as of more 
importance than the singing in Chapel. The whole 
student body attends the services of the Chapel and 
takes part in the singing. The best voices are chosen 
for the clioir, which leads in all the Chapel music, 
and often renders special selections, and for this pur- 
pose meets once a week for special practice. The 
students in this way become familiar with chanting, 
with the full choral service, and with the best church 
music. Membership in the choir is voluntary, but 
pupils admitted to the choir are required to attend 
the weekly rehearsal. 

The whole school is expected to join in the music 
of the Chapel services, and for this reason a rehearsal 
of the whole school is conducted by the Rector after 
the service in the Chapel on Saturday evenings. At 
the Sunday evening services four-part anthems are 
frequently rendered, and the organ accompaniment 
is supplemented by an orchestra. 

W$z Cfjorus Cto 

The Chorus Class is not confined to the music 
pupils, but is open to all students of the School, with- 
out charge. This training is of inestimable value, 
as it gives practice in sight reading and makes the 
pupil acquainted with the best choral works of the 
masters — an education in itself. 

Care is taken not to strain the voices and attention 
is paid to tone color and interpretation. The beauty 
and effect of chorus singing is in the blending of the 



48 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

voices, and to sing in chorus it is not necessary to 
have a good solo voice. 

This branch of the musical training is always en- 
joyed by the students, as everybody likes to sing, and 
almost everybody can sing. 

From the members of the Chorus Class voices are 
selected by the Chorus Conductor for special work 

in a Glee Club. 

Membership in the Chorus Class and m the Glee|- 
Club is voluntary. But parents are urged to re- 
quire this work from their daughters, if they are 
deemed fit for it by the Conductor. When, however, 
a pupil is enrolled in either, attendance at rehearsals 
is compulsory, until the pupil is excused by the 
Hector at the request of the parent. 
3tf)e ®xt\)t&txa 
Students of the violin, if sufficiently advanced, are 
required to take part in the Orchestra, which is in- 
cluded in the regular work of the department, lhj 
Orchestra meets once a week in the St, Mary's Audi 
torium. It is composed of twenty-five members, stu 
dents of the school and musicians from the city. Th<| 
Orchestra gives three public recitals during the yean 
the programs being made up of selections from tj 
best orchestral writers. The practice in ensembl 
playing is of great value to the students and tn 
work of the orchestra is a source of interest and m 
spiration to the life of the whole Music Department 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 49 

delation to tfje &cabemic department 

Studies in the Music Department may be pursued 
in connection with full academic work, or may be the 
main pursuit of the student. 

Study in the Music Department is counted to a 
certain extent toward the academic classification of 
regular pupils of the Academic Department. The 
theoretical studies count the same as Academic- 
studies. The technical work is given Academic 
credit in accordance with certain definite rules. (See 
page 52.) Xot more than three points credit in 
Music in one year, nor more than twelve points in 
all can be counted toward graduation from the Col- 
lege. 

Pupils specializing in music are, as a rule, ex- 
pected to take academic work along with their musi- 
cal studies. This is in accordance with the prevail- 
ing modern ideals in professional studies and the 
pursuit of special branches which require some gen- 
eral education in addition to the acquirements of a 
specialist. Pupils from the city may take lessons in 
music only. Certificates in Music are awarded only 
to pupils who have completed the required minimum 
of acadmeic work. (See page 53.) This require- 
ment, which applies also to the Art and Elocution 
Departments, is designed to emphasize the fact that 
the school stands for thoroughness and breadth, and 
will not permit the sacrifice of a well-rounded edu- 
cation to over-development in any one direction. 



.30 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Clarification in fflusit 

Pupils entering the department are examined by 
the Director and assigned to a teacher. 

Thereafter, at the end of the first half year (or 
earlier if advisable), the pupil's classification in 
music is decided and she is enrolled in the proper 
class. This determines her degree of advancement 
in her musical studies. 

The examinations for promotion are held semi- 
annually. The marks in music indicate the quality 
of work, not the quantity. Promotion is decided by 
an examination, which shows both that the required 
amount of work has been done, and that it has been 
well done. 

Candidates for promotion or graduation, after sat- 
isfying the requirements in theoretical attainments, 
are required to perform certain stipulated programs 
before the Faculty of Music. 

To be classified in a given class in Music the pupil 
must have completed the entire work indicated below 
for the previous class or classes, and must take the 
whole of the work laid down for the class she wishes 
to enter. Instrumental or vocal work is not sufficient 
for enrollment in a given class without the theoretical 
work. 

Classification in music is entirely distinct from 
academic classification ; but the satisfactory accom- 
plishment of the full work of the Freshman or 
higher classes in music is counted toward academic 
graduation, provided the pupil is at that time a mem- 
ber of the College. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 51 

Clashes m Jflustc 

(It should be carefully noted that the names of the 
classes as here used are of musical standing only, 
and do not refer to the academic class of which the 
same pupil may be a member.) 

The regular course is designed to cover a period of 
four years from the time of entering the Freshman 
class, but the thoroughness of the work is considered 
of far more importance than the rate of advance. It 
may require two or more years to complete the work 
of the Preparatory class. 
Preparatory.— Theory 1 and Course 1 in Piano, 

or in Voice, or in Violin. 
Freshman. — Theory 2 and Course 2 in Piu.no, or in 

Organ, or in Voice, or in Violin. 
Sophomore. — Theory 3 and Course 8 in Piano, or 

in Organ, or in Voice, or in Violin. 
Junior. — Harmony 1, Music History 1, Ensemble 

Work and Course J+ in Piano, or in Organ, or in 

Voice, or in Violin. 
Senior. — Harmony 2, Music History 2, Ensetmble 

Work and Course 5 in Piano, or in Organ, or 

in Voice, or in Violin. 

atuarbs 

The Certificate of the Department is awarded 
under the following conditions : 

1. The candidate must have completed the work, theoretical 
and technical, of the Senior Class in the Music Department. 
(See above.) 

2. The candidate must have been for at least two years a 
pupil of the department. 

jggg| Haryls School JUsem 



52 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

3. The candidate must have finished the technical work re- 
quired and have passed a satisfactory examination thereon, at 
least one-half year before the certificate recital which she must 
give at the end of the year. 

A Teacher s Certificate will be given in Piano, 
Organ, Violin or Voice, respectively, on the same 
conditions as the regular Certificate with the follow- 
ing modifications : 

1. The applicant does not have to complete her technical 
work before the end of the year. 

2. She does not have to give a public recital. 

3. She must demonstrate by practice during her last year 
her ability to teach the subject in which she applies for the 
Teacher's Certificate. 

The Diploma, the highest honor in the Music De- 
partment, is awarded to a pupil who has already re- 
ceived the Certificate and who thereafter pursues ad- 
vanced work in technique and interpretation for at 
least one year at the school. This work will be de- 
termined by the Musical Faculty, and the candidate 
must pass an examination satisfactory to the Faculty 
and give a public recital to be entitled to this award. 

&cabemtc Creoit for jWuStc Courses; 

The theoretical work in Music is credited for 
academic classification as follows: 

Harmony I and II (one point each). 

Music History I and II (one point each). 

Total: 4 points. 

The foregoing studies are credited, like any aca- 
demic subject, only when the pupil has attained an 
average of 75 per cent on the recitations and exam- 
inations of the year. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 53 

The technical work in Music is also credited for 
academic classification as follows : 

The completion at the School of the technical work 
in the Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, or Senior 
classes in Music will entitle the pupil to 3 points of 
academic credit for the work of each class thus com- 
pleted under the following conditions : 

( 1 ) Not more than three points may be earned in any one 
year in Piano, Voice, Violin, or Organ — whether one or more 
of these subjects is studied. 

(2) Not more than 12 points (one-fifth of the total amount 
required for graduation from the College) may be earned in 
all. 

(3) In order to be entitled to credit the pupil must be a 
member of the College. (Preparatory pupils may not count 
Music toward subsequent academic graduation. ) 

(4) In order to be entitled to credit for the technical work 
of a given class in music, the pupil must also have completed 
satisfactorily the theoretical work of that class. 

(5) Promotion to a given course in technical work is evi- 
dence of the satisfactory completion of the work of the previous 
course. 

Cfje Jlmtmum of gcabemtc WflLovk lUqutreo for Cer= 
ttftcateg 

Candidates for Certificates in any subject in the 
College, the Music Department, the Art Department, 
or the Elocution Department, must have completed 
the following minimum of academic work. This 
work must have been done at St. Mary's, or be cred- 
ited by certificate or examination in accordance with 
the regular rules for credits. 

(1) The A and B Courses in English, History, Mathematics, 
Science, and either Latin or French or German. 

(2) The C and D Courses in English and in History. 



54 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

(3) Such other C and D Courses as will amount to "eight 
points" of Academic credit. 
For example : 

Mathematics C and D. 
or Latin C and D. 

or French C and D and German C and D. 
or Math. C and Science C and D. 
or Latin C and French C and D, etc. 
It will be observed that the above covers the requirements 
for entrance to the Freshman Glass of the Academic Depart- 
ment with "20 points" in college ivork. ("60 points" is the 
requirement for an Academic Diploma.) 

®bt Courses 

The courses in Music are divided into Theoretical 
(including for convenience History of Music) and 
Technical. 

theoretical Courses 
Theory 1. (Miss Dowd. ) One hour a week. 

Cummings, Rudiments of Music. 
Theory 2. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. 

Virgil, Exercises for the Study of Time and Practical In- 
struction in Ear Training; Rhythm; Elementary Exer- 
cises in Sight Reading. 
Theory 3. (Miss Luney. ) One hour a week. 

The Scale. Shepherd, Simplified Harmony. Ear-training 

continued. Sight Reading. Ritter, Musical Dictation. 

Harmony 1. (Miss Seheper. ) One hour a week. One point* 

Emery, Lessons in Harmony. 
Harmony 2. (Miss Seheper.) One hour a week. One point* 

Emery, Lessons in Harmony (continued). 
History of Music 1. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. One 
point* 

Parry, History of Music; Elson, Club Programs of All 
Nations. 
History of Music 2. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. One 
point* 

Pauer, Musical Form. 



* These Points count on the academic standing of the pupil, provided she is 
already enrolled as a full member of a college class. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 55 

Cecfjnual Courses; 

In general, each course corresponds to a year's 
work for a pupil with musical taste. But even faith- 
ful work for some pupils may require more than a 

year for promotion. 

Piano 

Course I.— All major .scales in chromatic order, hands to- 
gether, quarter note M.M. 100. Harmonic and melodic 
minor scales, hands separate, eighth note M.M. 100. Major 
arpeggios, hands separate, quarter note M.M. SO. Studies, 
Duvernoy 176; Kohler op. 157, 242; Heller op. 47; Burg- 
muller op. 100. Easier sonatinas by Lichner, dementi, 
Kuhlau, etc. Read at sight first-grade piece. 

Course II. — Major scales, hands together, quarter note M.M. 
116. Harmonic and melodic minor scales, hands separate, 
quarter note M.M. 100; together M.M. 80. Arpeggios, 
major and minor, hands separate, quarter note 92. 
Duvernoy op. 120 ; Czerny 636 ; Le Couppey op. 20 ; Heller 
op. 46 ; Bach Little Preludes and Fugues. One major 
scale in octaves, hands separate, eighth note M.M. 120. 
Turner Octaves op. 28. Vogt Octaves. Sonatinas Kuhlau, 
Diabelli, etc. Read at sight second-grade piece. 

Course III. — Harmonic and melodic minor scales, hands to- 
gether, quarter note M.M. 116. Arpeggios, major and 
minor, hands together, quarter note M.M. 92. Major 
scales in octaves in chromatic order, hands separate, quar- 
ter note M. M. 72. Three scales in thirds, sixths, tenths, 
and contrary motion, quarter note M.M. 100. Czerny 299; 
Berens op. 61; Krans op. 2; Heller op. 45: Bach Two-Part 
Inventions. Easier Sonatas Clementi, Mozart, Haydn, 
Beethoven. Read at sight third-grade piece. 

Course IV. — Minor scales, hands together, quarter note M.M. 
132. Major and minor arpeggios, hands together, M.M. 
116. Three minor (melodic and harmonic) scales in in- 
tervals M.M. 100. Major scales in octaves, hands together 
M.M. 72. Scale of C in double-third, hands separate, 
eighth note M.M. 100. Bach French Suites, Three-part 
Inventions. Cramer Etudes. Clementi "Gradus ad Par- 



50 8T. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

nassuin" sonatas. Eead at sight a third-grade piece or 
play a simple accompaniment. 

Course V. — Six major scales and six minor scales (three har- 
monic and three melodic), in intervals M.M. 116. Arpeg- 
gios, dominant and diminished 7ths, hands together, M.M. 
116. All major scales in double thirds, hands separate, 
M.M. 72. Advanced studies in interpretation in prepara- 
tion for public recital. Public recital. 

Voice 

Course 1. — Breathing, tone placement and tone development. 
Sight singing. Studies by Wm. Shakespeare, a pupil of 
the great Francesco Lamperti. Sieber, eight-measure 
studies. Concone Marehesi, Bordogni. Xava, Elements of 
Vocalization. Simple Songs and Ballads. 

Course 2. — Management of breath, sight singing. Studies by 
Lamperti, Solfeggio Concone Vocalises. Bordogni Easy 
Vocalises, Marehesi Vocalises, Eighnini Exercises, Vaccai 
Method. Modern songs and easy classics. 

Course 3. — Spiker, Masterpieces of Vocalization, Books 1-2. 
Mazzoni Vocalises. Concone, Vocalises. Lamperti, Studies 
in Bravura. Viardot, An Hour of Study 1. Classic songs 
and arias. 

Course 4. — Otta Vocalizzi, Vannini. Bona, Rhythmical Articu- 
lation; Viardot, An Hour of Study 2. Spiker, Master- 
pieces of Vocalization, Books 3-4. Manuel Jarcia, Studies. 

Course 5.- — Classic Songs. Concert, Oratoria-Opera-C'olorature- 
Singing; Roulades, and embellishment. Public recital. 

©rgan 

Practical instruction is given from the first rudi- 
ments to the highest difficulties of the instrument, 
both in its use as an accompaniment to the different 
styles of Church music, and in the various methods 
of the employment of the organ as a solo instrument. 

Opportunity is given to acquire confidence and 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 57 

experience by practice in accompanying- the services 
of the Chapel, beginning with the easier work at the 
daily services of the School and going on through the 
accompaniment of anthems and more elaborate serv- 
ices on Sunday. 

Course 1. — The organ pupil must have enough work in piano 
to enable her to enter the Freshman class in piano. This 
constitutes the preparatory work for the organ course. 

Coukse 2. — Clemens' Organ School. Bach's Eight Short Pre- 
ludes and Fugues. Easy Preludes and Fugues by Merkel 
and Batiste. Horner's Pedal Studies Book. 

Course 3. — Buck's Pedal Studies. Bach's Preludes and Fugues. 
Light Solos for the Organ by Wely, Batiste, DuBois. 
Studies by Buck, Guilmant, Lemare. Service playing. 

Course 4. — Bach's Greater Fugues. Carl's Master Studies. 
Sonatas by Mendelssohn, Widor, Guilmant, Wolstenholme. 
Service playing. 

Course 5. — Standard Overtures of the Old and Modern Mas- 
ters. Service playing. Public recital. 

Aii advanced piano pupil might do the work of 
two of the above courses in one year. 

fXinlin 

The course in Violin is indicated in the summary 
given below. Pupils of the department, if suffi- 
ciently advanced, are required to take part in the 
Orchestra, which is included in the regular work of 
the department. 

Course 1. — Exercises and studies by Heming, David (Part I), 

Danc-la, Hofman op. 25, Wohlfahrt op. 45. Easy solos by 

Hauser, Sitt, Dancla, Papini, etc. 
Course 2. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, David (Part 

II), Sevcik op. 6, Kayser op. 37. Solos adapted to the 

needs of pupils. 



5S ST. MARYS SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Course 3. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, David (Part 
II, Sevcik op. 6, op. 8, op. 9, Dont, Kayser op. 20, Kreut- 
zer. Solos by DeBeriot, Dancla, etc. Modern composers. 

Course 4. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, Sevcik, Rode, 
Kreutzer. Sonatas, Concertos by Viotti, Spohr, DeBeriot, 
etc. 

Course 5. — Exercises and studies by Sevcik, Mazas, Fiorillio. 
Sonatas, Concertos. Public recital. 

A knowledge of piano, sufficient to play second 
grade pieces at least, is required in the case of pupils 
in the last two courses. 



ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

Miss Lila X. Brown, Director. 
The purpose of this course is to supply a recog- 
nized demand on the part of many parents for special 
instruction of pupils in the elocutionary art ; in order 
to prepare them to give intelligent expression to 
choice selections of prose and poetry. 

As a physiological study, the course is of consid- 
erable value, in teaching the healthfulness of deep 
breathing ; of the proper carriage of the body and of 
the proper use of the vocal muscles. 
Pupils are trained singly and in classes. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 59 

ART DEPARTMENT 

Miss Clara Fenner, Director. 

The aim of the Art Department is to afford an 
opportunity for serious study, and to give a thorough 
Art education, which will form the basis of further 
study in the advanced schools of this country and 
abroad ; also, to enable pupils who complete the full 
course to become satisfactory teachers. All work is 
done from nature. 

The Studio is open daily during school hours. Can- 
didates for a certificate in the Art Department must 
pass satisfactorily the course in Drawing, Painting, 
and the History of Art, and must also satisfy the 
academic requirements for a certificate as stated on 

page 53. 

The technical work in the Art Course, leading to a 
certificate, ordinarily requires a period of three years 
for completion. About half of this time is required 
for Drawing, and the second half for Painting. 

I. Drawing. The pupil is first instructed in the 
free-hand drawing of geometric solids, whereby she 
is taught the fundamentals of good drawing, the art 
of measuring correctly, and the drawing of straight 
and curved lines. This work is exceedingly important, 

Next the pupil is taught drawing from still-life, 
with shading ; the drawing of plants ; of casts ; origi- 
nal designs — conventional and applied — in black and 
white, and in color ; and pencil sketches from nature. 

After this comes charcoal drawings ; or shading in 
pen and ink; or wash-drawings in monochrome as in 
magazine illustrating. 



00 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

II. Painting. This includes work in oil and in 
water-color. 

The student is required to paint two large still-life 
groups ; two large landscapes ; two flower studies, one 
a copy and one from nature ; several sketches from 
nature, and two original designs. 

III. History of Art. — This study includes the 
history of Architecture, Sculpture and Painting. 
This course is important and is required of all pupils 
in the regular art course. 

Special Courses. — Pupils who do not wish to 
take the regular course may take any of the above 
courses or of the following special courses : 

1. Flowek Painting. — Special attention is given to flower 
painting in water color. 

2. Still-life Painting. — This work is preparatory to more 
advanced work in the flower painting and life classes. Either 
oil or water color may be used as a medium. 

3. China Painting. 

4. Life Class. — A living model is provided from which the 
pupils may draw and paint. 

5. Sketch Club. — This club is formed of pupils who take 
turn in posing in costume. The same model poses only once. 
During the spring and fall months outdoor sketching from 
nature is done. 

6. Advanced Antique. — All classes are graded according to 
this work. Drawing from Greek antiques in charcoal is re- 
quired of all pupils taking the full course. 

7. Composition Class. — This class is one of the most im- 
portant in the department, and makes for the development of 
the creative and imaginative faculties. Subjects are given and 
"pictures" must be painted and submitted for criticism on 
certain davs in the term. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 61 

S. Design Class. — This work is planned according to the 
principles originated and applied by Arthur W. Dow, and is a 
combination of the Occidental and Oriental principles. A close 
study of nature and an original imaginative use of her forms 
in design is the key-note of this method. 

9. Architectural and Mechanical Drawing. — To supply 
the demand for women draftsmen in architects' offices, a 
special course in Architectural and Mechanical Drawing is 
offered by the School. The course begins with geometrical 
figures, projections of objects, and leads up gradually to the 
highest forms of architectural work. 

10. Pyrography. — Apart from the regular work, some mem- 
bers of the Art Class have shown much interest in recent ses- 
sions in the work of this class. 

11. Stenciling. — This class offers an opportunity for apply- 
ing a knowledge of desi<>nin;r. 



62' ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Miss Lizzie H. Lee. Director. 

The Business Department of St. Mary's was estab- 
lished in 1897 to meet the growing demand for in- 
struction in the commercial branches, which are more I 
and more affording women a means of livelihood. 
The course is planned to accomplish this purpose as 
nearly as possible. 

The curriculum embraces thorough instruction in 
Stenography, Typewriting, Manifolding, etc., Book- 
keeping, Arithmetic, Penmanship, and English. 

Pupils taking, as is advised, the course in connec- 
tion with academic work, would ordinarily complete 
the Business Course in one school year. 

Pupils may take either the full course or any part 
of it. 

Graduates of the Department have been universally 
successful in their practical business engagements, 
and are the best recommendation for the work of the 
Department. 

Acquirements 

In order to be well prepared to take the course to 
advantage, pupils before entering the Business De- 
partment should have satisfactorily completed the 
work of the Preparatory School or its equivalent. 

Attention is called to the fact that the services of 
a stenographer and her ability to command a high 
salary depend not so much on her technical skill in 
actual typewriting and stenography, to which much 
may be added by practice afterwards, but to the 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 63 

preliminary mental equipment with which she under- 
takes her technical preparation. 

The Diploma of the department is awarded those 
pupils who complete the work of the full course. 

Notice is given that it is proposed after the aca- 
demic year 1909-10 to give the Certificate (instead 
of the Diploma as at present) for the completion of 
the work of the full course ; and to reserve the Diplo- 
ma for those who have the mental equipment to do 
unusually good work in their profession, and who 
have demonstrated their fitness for such work by 
actual practice. 

In order at present to receive the Diploma, the 
candidate must have completed the work in full re- 
quired for Certificates in Stenography, Typewriting, 
and Bookkeeping, including the academic course in 
English (English C), Commercial Arithmetic (Math- 
ematics X), and Commercial Geography (Geogra- 
phy X). 

Certificates in Stenography, Typewriting, or Book- 
keeping are awarded pupils who have completed the 
respective requirements stated below. 

Courses 

In Stenography, the Isaac Pittman System of 
Shorthand is used. This is the standard system, 
the most practical of all systems, is easily acquired, 
and meets all the demands of the amanuensis and 
the reporter. 



64 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

The Smith Premier Typewriter is the machine 
used in the Department. 

The work of the courses and the requirements for 
Certificates are as follows : 

Stenography. — The texts used are Isaac Pitman's Short 
Course in Shorthand, Business correspondence in Shorthand 
Nos. 1 and 2, and Book of Phrases and Constructions. In con- 
nection with the texts, the following books from the Isaac 
Pitman shorthand library are used in class for reading and 
dictation purposes: Vicar of Wakefield, Irving's Tales and 
Sketches, Macaulay's Warren Hastings, Dickens' Haunted Man, 
Leaves from the Note Book of Thomas Allen Reed, etc. 

The pupils are taught Manifolding, Composition, Punctua- 
tion, Spelling, Business Forms, Correspondence, and Reporting. 

To receive the Certificate, the pupil must have completed 
the required work in the foregoing; must have attained a 
speed of at least 80 words a minute from dictation; and must 
have completed the work of C English in the Academic 
Department. 

A Certificate in Stenography ivill not be given, unless the 
pupil has also taken the course in Typeivriting. 

Typewriting. — The touch system is used, and to obtain the 
Certificate the pupil must have attained a speed of 50 words 
a minute from dictation; J/0 words from printed matter; and 
30 words from stenographic notes; and must have completed 
the work of C English. 

Bookkeeping. — For the first principles of the subject, 
Allen's Forty Lessons in Bookkeeping is used as a guide. As 
the student advances, the instruction becomes thoroughly 
practical, a regular set of books is opened, and the routine of 
a well-ordered business house thoroughly investigated and 
practically pursued. The object is to fit the student to fill a 
position immediately after graduation from the School. 

For the Certificate, in addition to the technical work in Book- 
keeping, the course in Commercial Arithmetic (Math. X) must 
be completed. 



-ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 65 

Cerms $er gfouum 

All regular fees are due and must be paid quarterly 
in advance. 

Pupils are required to register at the beginning of 
each half-year and no pupil will be allowed to regis- 
ter until all past fees have been paid. 

Pupils are not received for less than a half-year, 
or the remainder of a half-year. As a- matter of sim- 
ple justice to the School, parents are ashed to give 
ample notice of intention to withdraw a pupil at the 
end of the half-year. 

No deduction is made for liolidays or for absence 
or withdrawal of pupils from school, except in cases 
of protracted sickness. In cases of absence or with- 
drawal for protracted sickness the school and the 
parent will divide losses for the remainder of the 
half-year. 

A deposit of $5.00 is required of all boarding 
pupils at the time of filing application, as a guaran- 
tee for holding place. This deposit is in no case re- 
turned, but on the entrance of the pupil is credited 
to her regular account. 

Regular Cfmrge* 

Boarding Pupils. — The regular charge for the 
school year is $281 for pupils in the dormitory; $291 
for pupils in rooms. This includes all living ex- 
penses and regular school fees. Charges for Music, 
Art, and Elocution are extra. There is no extra 
charge for languages. Rates are given helow. 



66 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

The regular charge includes: 

Board, light, fuel, alcove $200 

Academic Tuition 50 

Laundry 20 

Contingent, Medical and Library Fees. ... 11 

$281 
Room-rent ( if in rooms ) 10 

$291 

Local Pupils. — The full regular charge is $53.50. 

Academic tuition $50.00 

Contingent Fee 2.50 

Library Fee 1.00 

$53.50 
Pupils of the Primary Department are charged 
$30.00. 

Cxtra Cfjarges 

Music JBepartment 

Piano, Organ, or Violin $50 

If from the Director 60 

Vocal 60 

Use of Piano for practice 5 

Use of Organ for practice 10 

This charge is for one hour's practice each school day during 

the session. Additional practice is charged for at the same 
rates. 

Theory of Music, History of Music, or Harmony 10 

Music pupils are required to take one of these three subjects. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 67 

3rt department 
Drawing, etc. $30 

Painting in oil or water-color 50 

Art History 10 

Work in special classes at special rates. 

Business JBepartment 

Regular tuition $50 

This includes any or all of the business branches with 
English and Arithmetic. Xo reduction is made for a partial 
course, except as follows: 

Typewriting alone $15 

Bookkeeping alone 25 

The fee includes the use of typewriter. 

Expression Brpartment 
Private Lessons $50 

Lessons in Class 10 

<^ceasional Jfeesf 

Laboratory Fee.— A fee of from $3.00 to $5.00 
is charged pupils using the Science Laboratory. 

This fee is to cover cost of material and varies with the 
course. 

Graduation Fee. — A fee of $2.00 is charged each 
pupil receiving a diploma in any department ; and a 
fee of $1.00 is charged each pupil receiving a Cer- 
tificate. 

STncibental Cfjargesi 

These are not properly school charges, but are sim- 
ply charges for materials or money -which the school 
furnishes to the pupil as a convenience to the parent. 

A statement of the Incidental Account is sent 
quarterly. 

Parents are requested to make an Incidental De- 



68 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

posit to cover the cost of materials bought by the 
school and furnished to the pupils, and also to pro- 
vide pocket-money. As these charges will vary with 
need, no definite statement can be made, but ordi- 
narily $25.00 for the year will be sufficient in addi- 
tion to the allowance for pocket-money. 

Sheet Music and Art Materials are furnished by 
the school and charged at cost. 

Books and stationery will be furnished by the 
school if a deposit is made for this purpose. 

It is advisable that the pocket-money should be 
furnished only through the Rector, and it is urged 
that the amount should not exceed one dollar a week. 

explanatory Statement of Regular Charges 

The regular charges given in concise form on page 66 may 
be further explained as follows: 

Academic Tuition. — The charge ($50) is the 
same for a full course or a partial course. 

A pupil, however, taking only one or two classes is 
charged $20.00 a class. 

Laundry. — The laundry fee for the year is $20. 
For this each pupil is allowed an average of $1.50 
worth of laundry each week, or $48.00 worth for the 
year, at regular laundry prices. Additional pieces 
are charged extra at half rates. Laundry lists with 
prices will be sent on request. Pupils are expected 
to limit the number of fancy pieces. 

Contingent Fee. — An annual contingent fee of 
$5.00 for house pupils and $2.50 for day pupils is 
charged all pupils. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIX. 69 

Medical Fee. — All boarding pupils will pay a 
Medical Fee of $5.00 for the year. This fee entitles 
the pupils to the attention of the School Physician in 
all cases of ordinary sickness, and to such ordinary 
medical supplies as may be needed without further 
charge. All special prescriptions are charged extra. 

Pupils whose parents prefer to have some other 
than the School Physician may, with the Rector's 
consent, call in some other reputable physician at 
their own expense. 

Library. — An annual fee of $1.00 is charged all 
pupils for the use of the library. 

Room Rent.— Boarding pupils occupying rooms 
are charged an annual room-rent of $10.00. (This 
fee is not charged pupils in dormitories.) 

iDcbucttons 

A deduction of 10 per cent in the tuition charge is made in 
the case of pupils who take Vocal and Instrumental Music, 
Piano and Elocution, Music and Art, and like combinations. 
This deduction is made only to pupils who pay academic 
tuition. 

A deduction of $20.00 for the year is made in the charges 
when two or more boarding pupils enter from the same family. 

A deduction of 10 per cent of the tuition charge is made 
when two or more day pupils enter from the same family. 

These deductions are all conditional on the bill being paid 
in advance. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 

"I give, devise, and bequeath to the Trustees of 
St. Mary's School, Raleigh, North Caroliina, their 
successors and assigns, absolutely and forever (the 

property given), ■-. in trust that 

it shall be used for the benefit of said school, in the 
discretion of said Trustees, for building, improve- 
ment, equipment, or otherwise" 

(or) 
"in trust to be invested and the income derived 
therefrom to be used for the benefit of said school in 
such manner and for such "purposes as to the Trustees 
may seem best." 



W&t Bioccsan ^>ctjool (for girls) of ttje Carolinas 



The 6 9th session of St. Mary's School begins Sep- 
tember 15, 1910. 

Easter Term begins January 20, 1910. 



For Bulletins and other information, address 
Rev. GEORGE W. LAY, 

Rector. 



EDWARDS & BROUGHTON PRINTING CO., RALEIGH, N. C. 



April, 1310 &mtn I, 2?0. IB 

BULLETIN 



Publish^ ($uartnrlij bg £>t. iflanj'a i£>rlf0nl 
3Ralcifit, J2ortf) Carolina 




EDUCATION AND THE NEEDS OF^TO-DAY 

AN ADDRESS 

Delivered at St. Mary's School, April 20, 1910, at the Exercises'Commem- 

orating the Centennial Anniversary of the Birth^of 

Rev. Aldert Smedes, D.D. 

BY 

EMILIE W. McVEA 

Professor and Dean of the Woman's Department in thelUniversity 
of Cincinnati 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. C, as Second Class Matter 
Under Act of Congress op July 16, 1894 



RALEIGH, N. C. 
Founded in 1842 by Aldert Smedes, D.D. 



Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector. 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal. 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK... Secretary and Business Manager. 



We take great pleasure in publishing in this num- 
ber of the Bulletin the address by Miss Emilie W. 
McVea, delivered on April 20th, on the occasion of 
the Centennial Celebration of the birth of Dr. Aldert 
Smedes, the Founder and first Rector of St. Mary's. 

Miss McVea is Professor, and Dean of the 
Woman's Department, in the University of Cincin- 
nati, and is also one of the honored alumnse of St. 
Mary's. In her address she takes a comprehensive 
view of the whole subj ect of the education of women, 
and her views as here expressed will be found most 
instructive and suggestive and of great interest. 



education ano tfje Jleetos of ®o=bap 

To-day is for St. Mary's a day of memories, a day 
of joy, a day of hope. First, at this centennial cele- 
bration, our minds turn naturally to the past, to all 
that this school, founded more than three score years 
ago in faith and loving service, has stood for during 
the past generations. Then, as naturally, we take 
account of the present, the necessary changes that 
have come, the development that will make it pos- 
sible to keep step with modern conditions and mod- 
ern needs. Lastly, we endeavor to discern the needs 
of the future and to plan wisely and well for the 
days that are to come. 

The memories that center about the past will 
always be tender. Emotions are easily stirred at a 
celebration of this kind. Our hearts are full of love 
for all that has made St. Mary's dear to us. We 
recall the brave spirit of the earlier days, the found- 
ing in the face of unusual difficulties of a school that 
for generations has made its influence felt in thou- 
sands of lives and homes. We contrast the unaided 
efforts of Dr. Aldert Smedes, the founder, and of 
Dr. Bennett Smedes, his successor— their limited 
financial ability and lack of endowment, with the 
conditions surrounding the upbuilding of modern 
schools to-day, and we marvel at the enduring qual- 
ity of that which they wrought. Never has there 
been a more shining instance of unremitting en- 
deavor, purely for an ideal which held no hope of 
gain, for in their work revenues were unfailingly 



6 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

turned into further increase of power. We can 
only imagine the financial difficulties of the pioneer 
days, but those of us then connected with the school 
remember the heroism of the later struggle. During 
the years between 1885 and 1899, when State- 
supported institutions could barely sustain them- 
selves, every dollar of the private money of the Rec- 
tor was used to eke out the inadequate returns from 
rates of tuition. These rates were purposely kept 
low that the girls of the South might have the cul- 
tural and religious influences which St. Mary's has 
ever given to her daughters. Many private schools 
have greatly enriched their owners ; St. Mary's has 
enriched only its students and the community. But 
these things are to us an old, though loved, story. It 
is not my purpose to dwell on them now. Rather I 
would search dispassionately for those qualities 
which have made St. Mary's great in the past and 
upon them build our ideal for future development. 

If I read our history aright the characteristics 
which have from the beginning distinguished this 
school, have been simplicity, sincerity, a regard for 
tradition, an open-mindedness to the demands of 
new conditions, and a belief in the value of service. 
In the earlier years the standards of education for 
women required only a cultivated taste for litera- 
ture, an acquaintance with the stories of history, and 
some accomplishment in music or art. Girls of that 
period left school at the age of seventeen, and were 
considered fully equipped for life. St. Mary's ful- 
filled these demands and more. She succeeded in im- 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

planting in her students an appreciation of culture 
which enabled them to discern true values m litera- 
ture and in art, a love of truth which carried them 
far in intellectual development after they had left 
her halls, a reverence for sacred things, which made 
them a power for good in their church and in their 
community. Even in these earlier days, however, 
the founder of St. Mary's recognized that a woman 
who had the love of learning should be allowed to 
pursue severer studies. He formed a class m trigo- 
nometry and higher mathematics, for a single stu- 
dent, and to her devoted the time and care that he 
would have given to a class of twenty. In later 
years when educational ideas were in a state of flux, 
teachers were sent at the expense of the school from 
St Mary's to New York and to Boston to study new 
methods and to confer with authorities in their own 
line of teaching. This spirit of liberality has been 
evident in the successive modifications and enlarge- 
ments of the courses of study. Moreover, the work 
done was always sincere. No courses were ever cata- 
logued for show. So forcibly did the veracity of 
the statements strike those who knew what was being 
actually done, that a new teacher remarked to the 

principal : 

"I have never known anything like the modesty 
of your catalog. Most schools represent much more 
than they actually do, St: Mary's doesn't tell half 
of what she accomplishes." 

Moreover, while living conditions have been plain 
and simple, equipments have been on a liberal scale. 



8 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

To those accustomed to the furnishings of modern 
laboratories and seminar rooms, the implements of 
a generation ago may seem few and insufficient, 
but even then St. Mary's was incomparably better 
equipped than most schools with far larger means. 
The facilities for the study of astronomy, of phy- 
siology, of geology, of mathematics, the charts, the 
maps for history, the books for the library, were 
constantly renewed. Nothing for show and every- 
thing for use, was the watchword in all matters re- 
lating to the mental and physical life of the students. 
To-day hundreds of women are leading simpler, sin- 
cerer lives, intellectually and socially, because of the 
influence of this school upon them in their youth. 

Such has been the temper of this institution. 
Upon this spirit of the past we must plan securely 
for the future, for these very qualities promise, 
under modern conditions, an ever increasing useful- 
ness and a larger sphere of activity. But in order 
to enter into our heritage, the Alumnae of St. Mary's 
must be ready to give to her directors and to her 
principal not only love and loyalty, but an active 
and intelligent support along educational lines. We 
must be quick to recognize the present general edu- 
cational trend, the peculiar needs of the women of 
to-day, and the special place which St. Mary's may 
have in supplying these needs. We love the past 
and its tradition, but we must realize that tradition 
means sameness of purpose, not sameness of methods. 
We must welcome gladly the modifications, the ex- 
pansion, the increased facilities which alone can 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 9 

make St. Mary's adequate to meet the insistent de- 
mands of the present and provide for the new con- 
ditions that the future may bring. 

Let us first, then, examine the special needs of 
the women of our day. The most marked char- 
acteristics of our time are a restlessness involving 
a dissatisfaction with narrow conditions and a de- 
termination to develop the individual life which fre- 
quently exhibits itself in eccentricities. The old 
boundaries are broken down. Not so much through 
her own initiative as through underlying economic 
and industrial causes the young girl of to-day finds 
open to her countless avenues of enjoyment and of 
occupation. On the one hand we have the idleness, 
the luxury of the overrich ; on the other, the grinding 
work of the poor. Between these extremes is the 
girl who craves the independence of work to supply 
herself with pleasures which the modest means of her 
family can not afford, and, that higher type, the 
girl who longs to have some part in the actual work 
of the world. To the woman of the past generation, 
but one real occupation was open, that of wife and 
mother. She found her vocation and her enjoyment 
in the home. To-day industrial conditions have 
taken from the home a large part of woman's tra- 
ditional work, and have thus left her leisure for 
countless outside interests. Dazzled and bewildered 
by the variety of opportunity, earnestly desirous of 
developing herself and of accomplishing some good, 
the young girl turns restlessly from one thing to 
another. Unless our education meets her needs this 



10 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

restless girl will grow into the visionary, futile un- 
married woman, or the discontented wife, irked by 
responsibilities which she is unprepared to face. 
The education of fifty years ago will not prepare the 
woman of to-day even for her traditional vocations; 
new conditions demand new training. The present 
housewife and homemaker must have a knowledge 
of food values, of sanitation, of hygiene; where is 
she to look for this knowledge if it is not supplied by 
the preparatory schools and colleges ? The spirit of 
sincerity will be of inestimable value in shaping 
such courses. Excluding showy fads and dilettante 
knowledge, the ideal school for girls will lay deep 
and broad the foundation for those courses in chem- 
istry, in physiology, in domestic arts which must 
underlie the home making of the future. 

Again we must recognize that the boundaries of 
the family have enlarged. The limits of the home 
have become coterminus with the boundaries of the 
town or city, and more and more the activities which 
once centered in the home are becoming a part of the 
life of the community. The mother of to-day dare 
not absorb herself entirely in her family, for if she 
does, she inevitably limits her power and influence 
in that family. If she neglect the moral and social 
conditions of her community, her own children will 
become corrupted physically and morally by those 
neglected children to whose call she has shut her ears. 

The woman of the present can no longer make the 
clothes for her family in her own home; therefore 
for the preservation of the health of her children 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 11 

as well as for the sake of those who labor, she must 
know the conditions under which those clothes are 
made. It is futile to assert that a woman should not 
concern herself with factory laws, with factory in- 
spection, with pure food laws ; for the proper ad- 
ministration of these laws is essential to the integ- 
rity of her own family life. Housekeeping under 
modern industrial conditions has become a gigantic 
affair, it is not even limited by the State, but is 
national in character. 

Philanthropy, another of the traditional spheres of 
women, has widened its scope, and deepened its 
meaning. Charity has ceased to be an individual 
matter. One does not dare to alleviate symptoms. 
We no longer apply a poultice to an ulcer, but cut 
out the festering sore. We seek to know and to re- 
move the cause of evil, not merely to palliate the 
results and to soothe the individual. We can not 
give money to a beggar simply because he is a beg- 
gar, but must discover the reasons for his pauperism 
and endeavor to restore him to his lost place in 
society. So the traditional vocations of women — 
housekeeping and charity — demand an enlarged cur- 
riculum that will include training in political science 
and in sociology. ISTor are these studies necessary 
only for the woman who marries ; they are funda- 
mental to all women. From the continual outcry 
made in books and magazines one would imagine 
that because an increasing number of women re- 
main unmarried or because those who do marry have 
some community interests, the extinction of the 






12 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

American home is at band. It must be clear, bow- 
ever, that community interest properly directed 
means on tbe part of tbe mother, not less, but greater 
devotion to tbe borne. It may also be shown, I think, 
that the work of the unmarried woman tends more 
and more not to the destruction, but to the upbuild- 
ing of the ideal home of the future. In the days 
gone by the single woman whom the chivalry of the 
world dubbed "old maid," without means and with 
no influence in tbe community, bad a place of suffer- 
ance only in tbe home of a relative. By force of 
circumstance and convention she became, unless she 
were of unusual character, parasitic. To-day that 
same woman is an important factor in the economic 
and educational world; we believe that hereafter she 
will be increasingly important as a collaborator with 
the wife and mother for the home. Tbe foundation 
of home economics, of political and of social science, 
are then essential to her also because in order to be 
of service to the home she must understand its needs 
and its possibilities. But for her there may be in 
addition the study, the research denied to most 
mothers by the incessant details of their daily living. 
The woman who does research work in psychology 
with special reference to children and youth, who 
makes scientific investigation into the causes and 
the remedies of juvenile crime, who studies the needs 
of women and dependent children in the slums of our 
cities, is doing important work not only for society, 
but for tbe home which is the foundation of society. 
Jane Adams and Sophronisba Breckenbridge, both 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 13 

living institutional lives, one at Hull House and 
the other at the University of Chicago, are working 
not only for society at large but for the homes of 
America. The unmarried teacher, the research 
worker, the social worker are no longer homeless, 
they have vocations which enable them to make a 
dignified and independent living, and they have also 
a large part in the development of the family and 
of the community. 

The times are big with promise for both men and 
women, but opportunities are coming to women 
especially with a suddenness and largeness almost 
blinding. A real danger inheres in these very op- 
portunities : a tendency to over self-development for 
the sake of mere development, a superficial prepara- 
tion for some of the many possible vocations, a rapid 
changing from one line of life to another. The chief 
weakness of woman's work to-day in the family, or 
in a profession, lies in its instability and its lack of 
solid foundation in knowledge. Her education 
should remedy these defects. And it is the very 
spirit which St. Mary's has fostered which promises 
the thoroughness and poise necessary for a woman's 
highest accomplishment. Against the eccentricities 
and fads consequent upon the change and disruption 
of the old order, against the intense individualism 
of the home we would oppose the restraint that 
comes from dignity, reserve, and a recognition of 
the duty owed to religion, to the family, to the com- 
munity. The field of woman's activity has infinite 
room for expansion in service to humanity, but that 



14 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

service must be based on knowledge, not merely on 
emotion, and it must also be noted in the spiritual. 
St. Mary's as a distinctly church school has a special 
office in fostering that religious sense without which 
the work for the family or for the community loses 
its chief meaning. ]STon-religious effort has done 
much to alleviate physical suffering and to ameliorate 
environment, but the care for the bodies of men loses 
the larger part of its significance when untouched by 
the passion for righteousness. It is the high prom- 
ise of a school like St. Mary's to train the minds of 
our girls so that they may adequately meet the con- 
ditions of their own day, and also to quicken and 
clear their spiritual vision. 



gtfjrtmfor, 1910 



BmBB 1, No. 19 



1 iianj'a i^djonl 



BULLETIN 



•PubUfllfeb OPuartprlii bg §>t. Mary a Btfyaal 

SRalcigfj, J?orrf) Carolina 




Aluittnrc Nrnnbpr 

The Annual Meeting of the Alumnae Association. 

The Constitution and By-Laws of the Alumnae Association. 

The Graduates of St. Mary's: 1879-1910. 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. C, as Second Class Matteb 
Under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



RALEIGH, N. C. 
Founded in 1842 by Rev. Aldert Smedes, D.D. 



Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK. . . . Secretary and Business Manager 



Cfje 19X0 Annual Jffleetmg of tfje &t. illarp'a 
!£Uumna? gteaoctatton 



The regular annual meeting of the St. Mary's 
Alumna? Association was held as usual on the after- 
noon of the Tuesday of Commencement Week, fall- 
ing this year on May 24th, at 4 o'clock. On account 
of the driving rain the attendance was small, but the 
business transacted at the meeting was the most im- 
portant passed in some years, and included the adop- 
tion of a constitution in accordance with the pro- 
visions of which the Association will hereafter be 
conducted. 

Mrs. Mary Iredell, of Raleigh, the President of 
the Association for many years past, was in the 
chair, and Miss Kate McKimmon, the Secretary, was 
in her place. 

After calling the meeting to order the President 
asked the Rector of the School, Rev. George W. Lay, 
to offer prayer, and afterwards he made a short and 
inspiring talk to the Alumnae present, thanking them 
for their cooperation and asking them for continued 
assistance. 

The President then delivered her annual address, 
which was very brief. She thanked the members of 
the Association for their constant support; urged 
that definite action should be taken on the matters 
which were to be reported from the committees, and 
spoke the following tribute to Dr. Bennett Smedes: 



4 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

The recent celebration of the Hundredth Anniversary of the 
birth of the Rev. Aldert Smedes, D.D., the Founder, and for 
thirty-five years the Rector of St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, was attended by many who came from far and near to 
show their love and loyalty to the man whose life and teach- 
ing had influenced their lives. But many who were present 
on that occasion had never known the Founder, and yet had 
felt the influence of his work through the faithful example and 
teaching of his son and successor, the Rev. Bennett Smedes, 
who on his father's death nobly and loyally assumed his 
father's work, and carried it on until his own death, in 1898. 
His feeling of responsibility in doing this was very great. He 
was doing his father's work and he felt himself responsible for 
the highest good of every individual girl left in his charge. 
With a manner so kind and gentle that the most timid girl 
did not hesitate to approach him, he was yet firm when firm- 
ness was needed, and, like his father, he expected and required 
faithfulness to duty from teachers and scholars. Yet the un- 
failing gentleness and courtesy which marked all his dealings 
with them, strengthened his influence in the forming of the 
manners and character of the girls of St. Mary's. 

Mr. Smedes had foreseen from the beginning of his Rectorate 
the increasing difficulties which would confront all private in- 
stitutions of learning. Free schools not only in towns but in 
the rural districts, high schools, normal schools supported by 
State aid, one after the other soon began to threaten the life 
of St. Mary's as a private school. Then Dr. Bennett Smedes 
realized that in order to live as a Church School St. Mary's 
must become diocesan. An appeal was made to the Convention 
of the Diocese of North Carolina assembled in Charlotte in 
May, 1896. The plan was favorably considered, but not car- 
ried into effect until the Convention held in Raleigh in May, 
1897. Later the Diocese of East and South Carolina and the 
Jurisdiction of Asheville assumed their responsibilities, and 
St. Mary's became the Church School of the Carol inas. This 
was consummated during the lifetime of Dr. Bennett Smedes 
and he had the joy of realizing that his father's work would 
be perpetuated. No thought of self had kept him from assum- 
ing it, nor from expending his entire patrimony in keeping it 



ST. MART'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 5 

up. His faithfulness and zeal were rewarded, and St. Mary's, 
his father's work and his own, lives to serve the Church in 
whose service it was founded, and may it long so live and send 
out many more faithful daughters imbued with the principles 
for which St. Mary's has always stood. 

At the conclusion of her address the President an- 
nounced that the reports of the special committees 
would be taken up. 

Mrs. A. W. Knox, Chairman of the Committee 
on the Adoption of a Constitution, reported that 
the Constitution was ready and was offered by the 
committee to the Association for adoption. The 
Constitution was then read and briefly discussed by 
sections and as a whole, and was adopted with some 
slight amendment. Under its provisions the gov- 
erning body of the Association is the Alumnse Council 
of ten members, of which the President of the Asso- 
ciation is ex officio chairman. 

Following the adoption of the Constitution Mrs. 
John S. Holmes, Chairman of the Committee on 
Nominations, was recognized and submitted nomina- 
tions for officers for the year ending at Commence- 
ment, 1911, the committee having modified their re- 
port to conform to the provisions of the new Consti- 
tution. Supplementary nominations were made from 
the floor. The election of officers having been de- 
clared in order, and Mrs. Iredell having been re- 
nominated for President, she called Mrs. Knox to 
preside, and in a speech full of feeling declined the 
honor, stating that she believed that the time had 
come for the taking over of the chief work in the 
2 



5 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Association by new hands, and that her work had 
been in a measure completed with the adoption of 
the Constitution, though she hoped to be active in 
the affairs of the Association through life. Mrs. 
Iredell's wishes were respected, and on motion she 
was elected Honorary President for life, in slight 
token of her work in the Association. Mrs. Kate 
deR. Meares and Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, who had 
long been Vice-Presidents of the Association, were 
for like reason made Honorary Vice-Presidents. 

The election of the regular officers was then pro- 
ceeded with, and officers were chosen as follows: 

Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp, Raleigh President. 

Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, Durham Vice-President. 

Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's Secretary. 

Miss Martha A. Dowd, St. Mary's Treasurer. 

gflumnae Council 

The Officers, ex-officio. 

For three years — Mrs. A. W. Knox, Raleigh; Miss Annie G. 
Root, Raleigh. 

For two years — Miss Mary F. Henderson, Salisbury; Mrs. 
Albert L. Cox, Raleigh. 

For one year — Miss Florence W. Slater, New York City; 
Mrs. R. W. Winston, Raleigh. 

Miss Juliet Sutton then presented the report of 
the Committee on the Formation of Alumna? Chap- 
ters, etc., as follows: 

The Committee appointed by the Chairman at the April 20th 
meeting, consisting of Mrs. R. W. Winston, Chairman; Mrs. 
A. M. Waddell, and Miss Juliet Sutton, met at the School 
April 21st and submits the following report: 

The Committee believes that the best method of fostering 
and increasing Alumnae interest is by the formation of Alumnae 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 7 

Chapters wherever there are a sufficient number of Alumnse, 
and it further believes that a special and vigorous effort is 
necessary in order to get this organization fully under way. 
If the Alumnae Chapters can be once established and some plan 
devised to keep them in touch with the general interests and 
make them feel an individual pride and responsibility for their 
part of Alumnae success, we believe that the organizations will 
tend to nourish and grow and will prove of great service to 
the School. 

The Committee would suggest certain principles for guidance 
in connection with work to the end in view: 

( 1 ) That the Alumnae generally should be, as far as pos- 
sible, disabused of the idea that the Association exists for the 
sole purpose of the collection of funds, and that to that end 
the dues of members be made at present as light as possible 
and as few calls be made upon the Alumna for money as can 
properly be done. 

(2) That the social side be emphasized and the Alumnae be 
encouraged as far as possible to look upon the social feature 
as one of the most valuable in connection with the existence of 
a Chapter. To this end we believe it advisable to recommend 
to the Chapters that wherever possible they have a spring 
meeting in the form of a simple banquet or luncheon where the 
business will be transacted in connection with the entertain- 
ment, and that, if possible, the funds for this entertainment 
be provided from the general funds of the Chapter. 

(3) The appointment of an Alumnse representative to visit 
the present Chapters and aid in the formation of others where 
they are not now existent we deem highly important, and we 
consider the Association most fortunate to be able to enlist the 
interest of Miss Mary Henderson, of Salisbury, in this work. 
A series of visits by Miss Henderson to the important alumnae 
points this fall will unquestionably prove of the greatest ad- 
vantage. 

(4) We believe that increased interest on the part of the 
Alumnae in the Muse will lead to a better Muse which might 
prove of great interest to the great mass of the Alumnae, and 
we believe that the Association should endorse the publication 
and try to induce its members, so far as they can, to subscribe. 



8 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

In furtherance of these recommendations we wish to submit 
certain resolutions which we ask the Association to consider 
separately. 

This report was briefly discussed and approved and 
the resolutions referred to were then introduced, dis- 
cussed and adopted separately as follows : 

Resolved, That the Alumnae Council be instructed to appoint 
from its members a Traveling Secretary for the Association, 
who shall visit, so far as possible, the Alumna? Chapters now 
existent and such other communities as should have local Chap- 
ters, strengthening the Chapter where already existent and 
assisting to organize Chapters where Chapters are not now 
existent. 

Resolved further, That the Association authorizes the Alum- 
nae Council to pay the expenses of this Traveling Secretary 
from the general funds of the Association. 

Resolved, That Miss Mary Henderson be appointed Travel- 
ing Secretary. 

Resolved, That the Association formally endorses the St. 
Mary's Muse as the official organ of the Association, and urges 
its members to subscribe to the Muse, the subscription price 
being one dollar a year for the ten numbers including the two 
Alumnae numbers. 

Resolved further. That the Association instructs the Alum- 
nae Council to appoint one or more members of the Association 
to co-operate with the Editors of the Muse. 

Resolved further, That the Association urges each of the 
Alumna? Chapters to appoint a Correspondent who shall send 
the news of the Chapter to the Muse as frequently as possible. 

On motion a vote of thanks was tendered Miss 
Emilie Watts McVea, of Cincinnati, Chairman of 
the Committee on the Scholarship Fund, and Miss 
Florence W. Slater, of ]STew York, President of the 
]SJew York Chapter of the Alumnae, for their very 
effective work for the Association. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 9 

The question of the Scholarship Fund was then 
discussed. It was decided to continue the efforts to- 
ward completing the fund by special contributions, 
while applying the regular dues to the regular work 
of the Association. It was also decided to apply the 
interest from the funds now on hand to the objects of 
the fund instead of adding it to the principal. 

The Association then adjourned until the annual 
meeting on Tuesday, May 23, 1911, or before that 
date in case a special meeting should be deemed 
necessary. 



10 ST. MART'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Constitution of tfje g>t. Jfflarp's glumna? 
Association 

I. Name. 
The organization shall be known as "The Alumnae 
Association of St. Mary's School, Raleigh." 

II. Purpose. 

The purpose of the organization shall be the 

strengthening and perpetuating of the ties of school 

life among St. Mary's girls and the furtherance of 

the interests of St. Mary's School and her Alumnae. 

III. Membership. 

1. All former pupils of St. Mary's School in good 
standing shall be eligible for active membership m 
the Association, and may become members by mak- 
ing application to the Secretary of the Association, 
accompanying the application with payment of the 
annual dues. 

2. After being enrolled into active membership 
in the Association the payment of the annual dues 
shall serve to continue the member in good standing 
from year to year. 

3. An active member who fails to pay her dues in 
the year in which they are due shall be dropped from 
the active list, and may not be reinstated until all 
back dues are paid ; and the resignation of an active 
member may not be received unless all dues are 
paid to date. 

4. Only active members may vote or hold office. 

5. Members or ex-members of the Faculty of St. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 11 

Mary's and other persons who have shown any de- 
cided interest in the School or its work, may be 
elected honorary members of the Association by vote 
of the Alumnae Council. 

IV. Organization. 

1. There shall be a general central organization 
and branches to be known as Alumnae Chapters. 

2. An Alumnae Chapter may be organized in any 
locality in which there are three or more members 
of the Association, provided that not more than one 
such Chapter shall exist in any one parish. 

3. Members of the Association shall be, by virtue 
of their membership in the Association, entitled to 
membership in the local Chapter in whose territory 
they reside ; and members of any Chapter shall be, 
by virtue of their membership in the Chapter, en- 
rolled as members of the Association. 

4. The requirements for membership shall be the 
same in the Chapters as in the general Association, 
provided that honorary members may be elected to 
any Chapter without that making them members of 
the general Association. 

V. Government. 

1. The Association shall have a President, a Vice- 
President, a Secretary, a Treasurer and an Alumnae 
Council, elected by the Association at its annual 
meeting. 

2. The President and the Vice-President shall 
be elected for one year, and shall not be eligible to 
immediate re-election to their respective offices. 



12 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

3. The Secretary and the Treasurer shall be elected 
for one year each, and shall be eligible for re-election. 
They shall preferably be residents of the School or 
of Raleigh. 

4. The Alumnae Council shall consist of ten mem- 
bers, the four officers, ex officio, and six members 
chosen by the Association, for terms of three years 
each, two of the members retiring each year and not 
being eligible to immediate re-election. 

5. The Association shall pass on such matters as 
may be brought before the annual or special meet- 
ings, but in the interim between meetings the 
Alumnae Council shall have authority to act for the 
Association in all matters, provided that such action 
is in no case contrary to the Constitution or By-Laws 
of the Association or any general resolution of the 
Association passed at an annual or special meeting 
and in force at the time of such action. 

VI. Duties of the Officers. 

1. The President shall perform all the general 
duties usually performed by such officer, and shall 
be ex officio Chairman of the Alumnae Council. 

2. The Vice-President shall act for the President 
in case of her absence or disability. 

3. The Secretary shall keep all the records of the 
Association and shall perform all the general duties 
usually performed by such officer. 

4. The Treasurer shall have charge of all the 
funds of the Association and shall disburse them 
only on the order of the Association or the Alumnae 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 13 

Council. She shall collect all dues and account for 
the same. She shall make a full report in writing 
at the annual meeting, and other reports to th£ 
Alumnae Council when requested to do so. 

VII. Meetings. 

1. There shall be an annual meeting of the Asso- 
ciation held at St. Mary's at the time appointed in 
Commencement Week. 

2. Special meetings of the Association may be 
called at any time by the Alumnse Council on its own 
initiative or at the request of five per cent of the 
active members of the Association, provided that all 
active members shall be notified by the Secretary 
of the call for the special meeting and the business 
to be considered, and no business may be considered 
at the special meeting except that for which it was 
called. 

3. Five per cent of the active members shall con- 
stitute a quorum for the transaction of business at 
any meeting, provided that the minimum number 
for a quorum shall be twenty. 

4. At the annual meeting the Alumnse Council 
shall submit a full report of the business transacted 
for the Association since the preceding annual 
meeting. 

VIII. Alumnae Council. 
1. The Alumnse Council shall meet at such times 
as it deems necessary, provided that a meeting shall 
be held just prior to the annual meeting, and at such 



14 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

other times as business of more than routine impor- 
tance is submitted to it for consideration. 

2. The President of the Association shall be ex 
officio the Chairman of the Council ; the Vice-Presi- 
dent, ex officio Vice-Chairman ; the Secretary, ex 
officio Secretary. 

3. Four members shall constitute a quorum for 
the consideration of business, but no action binding 
upon the Association shall be taken without the af- 
firmative vote of at least five members, provided that 
the propositions passed at any meeting may be sub- 
mitted to the members of the Council by mail, and 
on the approval of at least six members shall become 
binding. 

4. The Council at its meeting preceding the an- 
nual meeting shall prepare the business to be con- 
sidered at the annual meeting; shall select officers 
and members of the Council to be nominated to the 
Association at the annual meeting; shall receive the 
reports of committees, and shall take such action at 
any time as it shall deem wise to expedite and further 
the purposes of the Association. 

IX. Alumnae Chapters. 

1. Alumnae Chapters may be organized as pro- 
vided in Article IV, section 2. 

2. Each Chapter may formulate its own rules and 
choose its own officers, provided that nothing is done 
contrary to the Constitution and By-Laws of the 
Association. 

3. The Chapters shall have no further specific 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 15 

duties than the furtherance of the general objects 
of the Association, except that they shall be expected 
to meet twice annually, on Founders' Day, November 
1st, and Alumnae Day, May 12th, or such other days 
near those dates as may be more convenient, and to 
be represented at the annual meeting of the Associa- 
tion. 

X. Amendment. 

This Constitution shall go into effect from the 
date of its passage, and shall not thereafter be sub- 
ject to amendment except by a majority vote at two 
successive annual meetings. 

I. Order of Business. 
The order of Business at the annual meeting 
shall be: 

1. Call to Order. 

2. Boll Call. 

3. Beading and Action upon Minutes. 

4. Bresident's Address. 

5. Beport of the Alumnae Council. 

6. Treasurer's Beport. 

7. Beports of Committees. 

8. Unfinished Business. 

9. New Business. 
10. Adjournment. 

II. Dues. 
(a) The annual dues of active members shall be 
one dollar, payable May 1st, for the following year, 
from May 1st to May 1st. 



16 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

(b) These dues may be paid directly to the Secre- 
tary, or if the members are members of an Alumna? 
Chapter, they may pay the dues to their local Secre- 
tary, who shall remit them forthwith to the Associa- 
tion Treasurer. 

(c) The dues shall be used for the general ex- 
penses of the Association, provided that in the case 
of members of Alumnse Chapters in good standing 
the Alumnse Chapter shall be entitled to one-half of 
the dues of each of its members for the general ex- 
penses of the local Chapter. A Chapter shall be con- 
sidered in due standing when it has reported to the 
Alumnae Council by May 1st of any year, with a list 
of its members and meetings of the year, and has 
paid in its proper amount of dues. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 17 

Cfje <grafcmates of &t. Jfflarp's 

(Any corrections to the information contained in 
this list will be welcomed. Regular courses for 
graduation were not arranged until 1879. Those 
persons whose names are starred* are deceased.) 

1879. 

*Lucy P. Battle (Mrs. Collier Cobb) (*1906) 

Kate D. Cheshire Tarboro, N. C. 

Josephine Myers (Mrs. Thos. A. Jones) Asheville, N. C. 

Eliza H. Smedes (Mrs A. W. Knox) Raleigh, N. C. 

Ella G. Tew (Mrs. W. E. Lindsay) Glendale, S. C. 

1880. 

*Lucy Allston (Mrs. Wm. Meade) (*1904) 

Annie Collins (Mrs. W. L. Wall) Durham, N. C. 

Fannie Huger (Mrs. Christopher Fitz-Simons), Columbia, S. C. 
Gabrielle de Rossett (Mrs. A. M. Waddell) . .Wilmington, N. C. 

1881. 

Minnie Albertson Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Mary Settle (Mrs. Benj. Sharp) Greensboro, N. C. 

1882. 

Rebecca A. Collins (Mrs. Frank Wood) Edenton, N. C. 

Sallie L. Daniel (Mrs. E. G. Rawlings) Wilson, N. C. 

Kate M. Lord (Mrs. John Waters) Charlotte, N. C. 

Florence W. Slater 541 Lexington Ave., New York City. 

Ula P. Thompson 

1883. 

*Mary Battle (Mrs. Collier Cobb) (*1900) 

Kate L. Sutton (Mrs. Walter Crews) Raleigh, N. C. 

1884. 

♦Elizabeth D. Battle (*1899) 

Martha A. Dowd St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

S. Isabel Graves Mt. Airy, N. C. 



18 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Alice Hagood (Mrs. ) Texas. 

Emilie W. McVea Univ. Cinn., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annie H. Philips (Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson) . . . Richmond, Va. 
Emilie R. Smedes (Mrs. Jack Holmes) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

1885. 

Julia Horner (Mrs. H. G. Cooper) Oxford, N. C. 

Anna Lewis Ward (Seminary, Nashville, Tenn. 

*Carrie L. Matthewson (Mrs. Willie Law) 

Sophia D. Thurmond Sewanee, Tenn. 

Jane W. Bingham (Mrs. Walter Toy) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

1887. 
Kate I. Gregory (Mrs. H. C. Robert) ... Ill 2d St., Macon, Ga. 

Frederika P. Mayhew (Mrs. Troy Beatty) Athens, Ga. 

Henrietta R. Smedes Washington, D. C. 

Elizabeth McLean Cheraw, S. C. 

1888. 

^Caroline F. Allston ( *1896) 

Malvina Graves 

Jessie Gregory Crowell, N. C 

Mabel Hale The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

1889. 

Elizabeth B. Badham (Mrs. Julian Wood) Edenton, N. C. 

Alice M. Dugger ( Mrs. Walter Grimes ) Raleigh, N. C. 

Louise Finley Sewanee, Tenn. 

Beatrice Holmes (Mrs. Robert Allston) Tryon, N. C. 

Laura Johns 

Fannie N. Yarboro (Mrs. T. W. Bickett) Louisburg, N. C. 

1890. 

*Elizabeth Bridgers (Mrs. Cox-Finney) (*1903) 

Laura Carter Fairmount, Monteagle, Tenn. 

Charlotte E. Dancy Battle Creek, Mich. 

Mary P. Frost Charleston, S. C. 

Bettie C. Gregory Crowell, N. C. 

Carrie G. Hall 

Martha H. Haywood Raleigh, N. C. 

Alice Henderson Washington, D. C 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 19 

Lucy Hester Washington, D. C. 

Daisy Horner (Mrs. R. C. Strong) Raleigh, N. C. 

Selma Katsenstein Warrenton, N. C. 

Annie Moore New York City. 

Mary Phillips (Mrs. Hal Wood) Edenton, N. C. 

1891. 

*Emily H. Barnwell (Mrs. Ravenel) Charleston, S. C 

Charlotte Bush Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Susan P. Frost -t Logan St., Charleston, S. C. 

Lillie S. Hicks (Mrs. Bancker Smedes) Boonton, N. J. 

Grace McH. Jones Asheville, N. C. 

Marion A. Mallett Fayetteville, N. C 

*Henrietta S. McVea 

Dixie C. Murray (Mrs. Weldon Smith) Raleigh, N. C. 

Virginia Thomas Mobile, Ala. 

L. Wirt Wesson ( Mrs. W. T. Turpin ) Centreville, Md. 

1892. 

Charlotte Allston ( Mrs. Maurice Moore ) Union, S. C. 

M. Elise Carwile 

May H. Davis School for the Blind, Raleigh, N. C. 

Janet W. Dugger (Mrs. Ed. Simpson) Enfield, N. C. 

Jennie Pescud (Mrs. W. A. Withers) Raleigh, N. C. 

Frances Tunstall (Mrs. Clem Dowd) Statesville, N. C. 

1893. 

Blanche Blake ( Mrs. Wm. E. Manor ) Harrisonburg, Va. 

Estelle Brodie (Mrs. Howard Jones) Warrenton, N. C. 

*Annie Gregg 

Nannie B. Jones (Mrs. T. M. Ashe) Raleigh, N. C. 

*Lillie Masten ( Mrs. de Brutz Cutlar ) 

Gertrude Royster Raleigh, N. C. 

Daisy Waitt Raleigh, N. C. 

Bessie L. Whitaker Santiago, Cuba. 

*Loulie Woodell 

1894. 

*Julia Daggett 

Jessie Degen 54 State St., Portland, Maine. 

Marie Lee (Mrs. H. H. Covington) Sumter, S. C. 



20 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Laura Newsom (Mrs. Maurice O'Neil) Henderson, N. C. 

Mary Page Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Wilmerding ( Mrs. F. W. Ambler ) Summerville, S. C. 

1895. 

Elizabeth E. Ashe (Mrs. George Flint) Raleigh, N. C. 

Loula Briggs Raleigh, N. C. 

Margaret V. Hill (Mrs. W. E. Schroeder) Portsmouth, Va. 

Evelyn Holmes Bowman's Bluff, N. C. 

Miriam R. Lanier Tarboro, N. C. 

Fairinda W. Payne (Mrs. Cam. MacRae) . . . .Wilmington, N. C. 

Eleanor Vass Raleigh, N. C. 

Marie A. Walker (Mrs. Hamilton Holmes) Tryon, N. C. 

1896. 

Florida Barnes (Mrs. Chas. Hopkins) Tallahassee, Fla. 

Harriet E. Bowen Jackson, N. C. 

Elizabeth Cheshire Hankow, China. 

Lucy Cobb Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Margaret M. Jones 101 W. 109th St., New York City. 

Mary P. Jones 101 W. 109th St., New York City. 

M. Susan Marshall Raleigh, N. C. 

*Katherine P. Matthews 

Columbia Munds Wilmington, N. C. 

Nannie Skinner (Mrs. Joshua Hill) Raleigh, N. C. 

Bertha Stein Raleigh, N. C. 

1897. 

Nannie G. Clark Tarboro, N. C. 

Mary M. Hanff (Mrs. John Paylor) . . .Jones St., Raleigh, N. C. 
Theodora Marshall (Mrs. Duncan Cameron), 

Care Standard Oil Co. of N. Y., Canton, China. 

Lillie E. Koonce (Mrs. Patterson) Smithfield, N. C. 

Isabella Pescud Raleigh, N. C. 

1898. 

Olive Armstrong ( Mr. Geo. D. Crow ) West, Texas. 

Frances H. Cameron (Mrs. Chas. Burnett) U. S. Army. 

Josephine Belle Gulley Raleigh, N. C. 

Sally Harris 

Kate McK. Hawley (Mrs. M. R. Bacon) Fayetteville, N. C. 



i 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 21 

Jessamine May Higgs (Mrs. Henry C. Walter) . . .Raleigh, N. C. 

Annie Shaw (Mrs. John Smith) Farmville, N. C. 

Margaret H. Smedes (Mrs. John I. Rose) Durham, N. C. 

Sarah Smedes Root (Mrs. Watkins Robards) . . . .Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary G. Smith (Mrs. H. M. Holmes) Union, S. C. 

Ethel Worrell Norfolk, Va. 

1899. 

Christine Busbee 31 Ward Place, So. Orange, N. J. 

Minna Bynum (Mrs. Archibald Henderson) . .Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Lucy Kate Cannady (Mrs. Harry Williams) Oxford, N. C. 

Lucy B. Clifton (Mrs. Saml. Boddie) Louisburg, N. C. 

Kate B. Connor (Mrs. Hugh H. Murray) Wilson, N. C. 

Lillie E. Dodd Tyner, Tenn. 

Annie M. Dughi (Mrs. J. D. Maag) Baltimore, Md. 

Nina W. Green (Mrs. LeRoy Thiem) Raleigh, N. C. 

Josephine A. Osborne Charlotte, N. C. 

Alice D. Smallbones (Mrs. G. M. Brunson) . . . .Charlotte, N. C. 
Margaret Trapier (Mrs. Allen Rogers) Raleigh, N. C. 

1900. 
Mary H. Andrews (Mrs. Wm. Person) . . . .Sparrow's Point, Md. 

*Nannie Belvin (*1905) 

Ellen B. Bowen Jackson, N. C. 

Reba Bridgers Bagnio, P. I. 

Mildred Cunningham Madison, N. C. 

Alice L. Love (Mrs. H. P. S. Keller) Raleigh, N. C. 

Annie S. Love (Mrs. Frank L. Wilson) Raleigh, N. C. 

Caroline M. Means 1230 Amsterdam Ave., New York City. 

Anna Louise Pittenger (Mrs. Leigh Skinner) . . . .Raleigh, N. C. 
Annie Pearl Pratt (Mrs. J. J. Van Noppen) . . . .Madison, N. C. 
Mary Cornelia Thompson (Mrs. J. G. de Roulhac 

Hamilton) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Mary A. Renn (Mrs. Paul Taylor) Durham, N. C. 

1901. 

Jeannette Biggs Oxford, N. C. 

Deas Manning Boykin Boykin, S. C. 

Annie Lee Bunn (Mrs. R. B. Davis, Jr.) . . . .Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Eliza H. Drane (Mrs. Cheshire Webb) Hillsboro, N. C. 

Lena Dawson Littlefield, N. C. 



22 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Ellen J. Faison ( Mrs. J. W. Sasser ) Savannah, Ga. 

Elizabeth Montgomery Washington, D. C. 

Julia Norton Parsley Wilmington, N. C. 

Alice E. Welch ( Mrs. Vernon Austin ) Monroe, N. C. 

1902. 

Marie Brunson (Mrs. P. A. Wilcox) Florence, S. C 

Jennie G. B. Trapier Monteagle, Tenn. 

Louise Venable Chapel Hill, N. C. 

1903. 

Annie Webb Cheshire Wusih, China. 

Mary Day Faison Raleigh, N. C. 

Elise Moore Gregory Henderson, N. C 

Juliet Hamlet Harris Forsyth, Ga. 

Mary Ferrand Henderson Salisbury, N. C. 

Mary Hoi ton Hunter 213 Middle St., Portsmouth, Va. 

Maretta Belo Holman Raleigh, N. C. 

Katherine de Rossett Meares Wilmington, N. C. 

Annie Gales Root Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Allan Short (Mrs. Arthur B. Skelding), 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Florence Jackson Thomas ( Mrs. Brent Diane ) 

U. S. Irrigation Service, Guayama, Porto Rico. 
Mary Wood Winslow Hertford, N. C. 

1904. 
Eliza Richards Brown (Mrs. Edward Roe Stamps), 

Milledgeville Road, Macon, Ga. 

Isabel Ashby Brumby Marietta, Ga. 

Minnie Greenough Burgwyn Jackson, N. C. 

Cornelia Coleman 1 Navarro Apartments, Macon, Ga. 

Virginia Albright Eldridge Raleigh, N. C. 

Ann Kimberly Gifford (Mrs. (Lieut.) Jas. Cunningham), 

Fort Washington, Md. 

Daisy Watson Green Raleigh, N. C. 

Margaret Herbert (Mrs. Frank Edward Herbert), 

Buckroe Beach, Va. 

*Marjorie Hughson (*1910) 

Esther Barnwell Means. .1230 Amsterdam Ave., New York City. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 23 

Elizabeth Willing Massey (Mrs. Dr. Raymond D. 

Tompkins ) Jasper, Fla. 

Carrie Helen Moore Littleton, N. C. 

Lucy Taylor Redwood (Mrs. S. Thomas Nottingham) 

Chesapeake, Va. 

Elizabeth Piemont Skinner Raleigh, N. C. 

Margaret Gray Stedman Raleigh, N. C. 

1905. 

Anna Barrow Clark Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Rena Hoyt Clark Tarboro, N. C. 

Margaret Rosalie DuBose (Mrs. Isaac T. Avery) 

Morganton, N. C. 

Ida Pollard Evans Warrenton, Va. 

Effie Christian Fairley (Mrs. N. C. English) . . . .Monroe, N. C. 

Ellen Phifer Gibson Concord, N. C. 

Florence Lawton Grant Wilmington, N. C. 

Dorothy May Hughson Morganton, N. C. 

Sadie Marcelline Jenkins. . . .Winthrop College, Rock Hill, S. C. 

Bessie Poe Law (Mrs. Paul E. Davis) Wilson's Mills, N. C. 

Mossie Elizabeth Long Rockingham, N. C. 

Mary Ellis Rossell St. George, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Malinda Ray Tillinghast Raleigh, N. C. 

1906. 

Ruth Foster 108 E. Gwinnett St., Savannah, Ga. 

Jane Iredell Green ( Mrs. Herbert A. Lynch ) Bolton, N. C. 

Annie Eliza Koonce Richlands, N. C. 

Mary Thornton Lassiter Hertford, N. C. 

Margaret Devereux Mackay (Mrs. George L. Jones), 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Harriett Elizabeth Ruff Ridgeway, S. C. 

Annie Whitner Sloan (Mrs. James A. Cathcart) Columbia, S. C. 

*Sarah Gertrude Sullivan (*1909) 

Frances Elizabeth Woolf Demopolis, Ala. 

1907. 

Helen Ball Raleigh, N. C. 

Heber Corinne Birdsong Raleigh, N. C. 

Emily Jordan Garrison (Mrs. Albert S. Thomas) Cheraw, S. C. 
Beatrice Bollman Cohen Florence, S. C. 



24 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Lillian Hauser Farmer Florence, S. C. 

Louise Hill Lexington, N. C. 

Alice McCullers McCullers, N. C. 

Sue Brent Prince Wilmington, N. C. 

Mary James Spruill Littleton, N. C. 

1908. 

Bertha Belo Holman Raleigh, N. C. 

Isabel Atwell Hanna Baltimore, Md. 

Marguerite LeCron Baltimore, Md. 

Marguerite Vertner Thompson Baltimore, Md. 

Elizabeth Turner Waddill Cheraw, S. C. 

1909. 

Sal lie Haywood Battle Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Georgia Stanton Hales Wilson, N. C. 

Minnie Leary .Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Julia Louise Mclntyre Mullins, S. C. 

Eva Rogerson Edenton, N. C. 

Frankie Lenore Self Hickory, N. C. 

1910. 

Mary Mitchell Chamberlain West Raleigh, N. C. 

Julia Fisher Coke Raleigh, N. C. 

Grace Trueman Deaton Raleigh, N. C. 

Irma Deaton Raleigh, N. C. 

Lena Payne Everett Rockingham, N. C. 

Minnie Tamplet Hazard Georgetown, S. C. 

Paula Elizabeth Hazard Georgetown, S. C. 

Alice Leigh Hines Kinston, N. C. 

Sarah Vernon Holloway Enfield, N. C. 

Nannie Davis Lee Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Ruth Mardre Windsor, N. C. 

Laura Meares Asheville, N. C. 

Alice Noble Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Virginia Randolph Boiling Pickel Raleigh, N. C. 

Ida Jean Rogerson Edenton, N. C. 

Ha Adele Rountree (Mrs. C. L Pridgin) Marion, N. C. 

Rebecca Hill Shields Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Mary Campbell Shuf ord Hickory, N. C. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 

"I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of 
St. Mary's School, Raleigh, North Carolina, their 
successors and assigns, absolutely and forever (the 

property given), in trust that 

it shall be used for the benefit of said school, in the 
discretion of said Trustees, for building, improve- 
ment, equipment, or otherwise" 

(or) 
"in trust to be invested, and the income derived 
therefrom to be used for the benefit of said school in 
such manner and for such purposes as to the Trustees 
mav seem best." 



&L Jfflarp'sf 

Cfje ©iocefian Hscfjool ( for ditrls ) of tfje Carolina* 



The 69th session of St. Mary's School began Sep- 
tember 15, 1910. 

Easter Term begins January 19, 1911. 



For Bulletins and other information, address 
Rev. GEORGE W. LAY, 

Rector. 



Januanj, 13X1 



&erfeB 1, £fa. 30 



1 ilanj a ^rljtml 



BULLETIN 




trustees anb Jf acuity, 191041. 
gtoarbsf anb Btsfttnctions;, 1909=10. 
CnroUment, 1910=11. 
(general &egulattcms(, etc. 
therms; 



$ubltnlji>& QPuartprlu b£ ^t. iUarga Btlfoal 
&aleigfj, jaortfj Carolina 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. C, as Second Class Matter 
Under Act of Congress op July 16, 1894. 



frt fflatfg Mool 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Founded in 1842 by Aldert Smedes, D.D. 



Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK. . . . Secretary and Business Manager 



Calenbar for 1910=1911 

Session of 1910-11. 

January 3, Tuesday School duties resumed at 7:00 p. m. 

January 19, Thursday Easter Term (Second Half-year) begins. 

March 1, Ash Wednesday Lent begins. 

April 9, Palm Sunday Annual Visit of the Bishop for Confirma- 
tion. 
April 14, Good Friday Holy Day. 

May 12, Friday Alumnse Day: 69th Anniversary of the 

Founding of St. Mary's. 

May 25, Thursday Ascension Day. 

May 21— May 25 Commencement Season. 

Session of 1911-12. 

September 18, Monday Faculty assemble at St. Mary's. 

September 19, Tuesday Registration and Classification of City 

Pupils: New Boarding Pupils report by 

7 p. m. 

September 20, Wednesday Preliminary Examinations: Old Boarding 

Pupils report by 7 p.m.: Registration and 
Classification of Boarding Pupils. 

September 21, Thursday Opening Service of Advent Term (First 

Half-year) at 9 a. m. 

November 1, Wednesday All Saints: Founder's Day. 

December 15— January 3 Christmas Recess. 

January 25, Thursday Easter Term begins. 

No absence from the School is allowed at or near Thanhs- 
: giving Day, Washington's Birthday, or Easter. The only recess 
is at Christmas. 



Wbt Poarb of HLxuftttt& 



Cijt J3iSf)OpS 

Rt. Rev. Jos. Blount Cheshire, D.D., Chairman Raleigh, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Robt. Strange, D.D Wilmington, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Wm. Alexander Guerry Charleston, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner Asheville, N. C. 

Clerical ana Hap trustees 

NORTH CAROLINA. 
Rev. M. A. Barber, Raleigh. Rev. J. E. Ingle, Henderson. 

*Rev Dr. R. H. Lewis, Raleigh. 

Col. Chas. E. Johnson, Raleigh. Hon. R. H. Battle, Raleigh. 

Mr. W. A. Erwin, Durham. Mr. D. Y. Cooper, Henderson, 

(until 1915.) (until 1912.) 

EAST CAROLINA. 
Rev. R. B. Drane, D.D., Edenton. Rev. T. P. Noe, Wilmington. 

Mr. Frank Wood, Edenton. Mr. Geo. C. Royall, Goldsboro. 

(until 1915.) (until 1912.) 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Rev. T. T. Walsh, Yorkville. Rev. L. G. Wood, Charleston. 

Mr. P. T. Hayne, Greenville. Mr. T. W. Bacot, Charleston. 

(until 1911.) (until 1911.) 

ASHEVILLE. 
Rev. W. H. Hardin, Gastonia. Rev. McNeely DuBose, Morganton. 

Hon. Wm. A. Hoke, Lincolnton. Mr. F. A. Clinard, Hickory, 

(until 1915.) (until 1912.) 

Cxecutibe Committee 

Rt. Rev. J. B. Cheshire, D.D., Chairman. 
Hon. R. H. Battle. Dr. R. H. Lewis. 

Col. Chas. E. Johnson. Mr. W. A. Erwin. 

Mr. George C. Royall. 

ibecretarp anb ^Treasurer 

Dr. K. P. Battle, Jr. 

*Vacant. 



Cfje Jfacultp anb Officers! of g>t ifflarp's; 
19104911 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector. 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal. 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Secretary. 

Cfie SUcabemic Uepartment 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Bible, Ethics, and Greek. 

(A.B., Yale. 1882; B.D., General Theological Seminary, 1885; master 
in St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., 1888-1907. Rector of St. Mary's, 
1907—) 

ELEANOR W. THOMAS English and Literature. 

(A.M., College for Women, S. C, 1900; summer student, Columbia 
University, N. Y., 1905; instructor. Greenville College, S. C, 1904. 
Instructor in St. Mary's, 1900-1904; 1905—) 

WILLIAM E. STONE History and German. 

(A.B., Harvard, 1882; principal, Edenton, N. C., Academy, 1901-02; 
master in Porter Academy, Charleston, 1902-1903. Instructor in St. 
Mary's, 1903—) 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Science. 

(A.B., Washington College, Md., 1897; A.M., 1898; graduate student 
Johns Hopkins University, 1900. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1903—) 

FRANCES MACAULEY French. 

(Certificat Universite de Grenoble, France; Private teacher. Instruc- 
tor in St. Mary's, 1910—) 

ANNA C. BUXTON English. 

(St. Mary's, 1901; Bryn Mawr, 1902-1905; teacher in Winston-Salem. 
Instructor in St. Mary's, 1910 — ) 

NINA K. VAN DYNE Mathematics and Spanish. 

( A.B., Cornell, 1910. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1910—) 

HELEN URQUHART Latin. 

( A. B., Mount Holyoke, 1910. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1910—) 

MURIEL M. VICTOR Elocution and Physical Culture. 

(Hawn School of the Speech Arts; Emerson and Southwick Systems of 
Physical Culture. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1910 — ) 

KATE McKIMMON Primary School. 

(Student and teacher at St. Mary's since 1861.) 
MABEL A. HORSLEY Preparatory Work. 

(Graduate Powell's School, Richmond, Virginia. Assistant in St. 
Mary's, 1907—) 

LOUISE HILL Assistant. 

(Graduate of St. Mary's, 1907; teacher in Lexington, N. C, 1907-10. 
Assistant in St. Mary's, 1910—) 



6 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

iftugic department 

MARTHA A. DO WD, Director (Piano, Theory, 

(History of Music. 

(Graduate of St. Mary's, 1884; pupil of Kuersteiner, Sophus Wiig, Al- 
bert Alack. Teacher in St. Mary's, 188t> — ; Director of Music, 1908—) 

R. BLINN OWEN Voice, Organ. 

(M. Mus., Detroit School of Music; pupil of Zimmermann, Mazurette, 
Theo. Beach, of Detroit; Kreutschmar, in New York; teacher in 
Detroit and New York; private teacher in Bluefleld, W. Va., and 
Greensboro, N. C., 1906-09. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1909—) 

MARJORY SHERWIN Violin. 

(Pupil of Davidson of Buffalo; pupil for three years of Sevcik in 
Prague; European certificate of scholar-hip of the first rank. Pri- 
vate teacher and concert soloist. Teacher in St- Mary's, 1909—) 

HERMINE R. SCHEPER Piano, Harmony. 

(Graduate New England Conservatory; private student. New York 
City; teacher, Converse College, S. C; Hamilton Institute, W'ash- 
ingtou ; Elizabeth College, N. C. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1907 — ) 

BERTHA MAY LUNEY Piano, Organ. 

(Pupil of Hyatt and Becker at Syracuse University; Foote of Troy; 
and Tipton, of the Albany Cathedral. Teacher in St. Mary's, 
1908—) 

SUSIE SIMMS BATTLE Piano. 

(Certificate in Piano. St. Mary's. 1904; teacher, Winthrop College, 
(S. C.) 1905-09. Teacher in St. xMary's, 1909—) 

F. ZULETTE WILSON Voice. 

(Pupil of F. E. Bristol In New York and of Juliani in Paris, and 
R. T. Percy. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1910—) 

ELLA DORROH Piano. 

( Certificate in Piano, St. Mary's, 1910. Teacher, 1910—) 

9rt department 

CLARA I. FENNER, Director { Drawing Painting, 

I Design, etc. 

(Graduate Maryland Institute, School of Art and Design, special student 
Pratt Institute, 1905 ; special student in Paris, 1907. Director of Art, St. 
Mary's, 1888-96 ; 1902—) 

elocution department 

MURIEL M. VICTOR Elocution and Physical Culture. 

(C ertificate, Hawn School of the Speech Arts, New York ; private pupil of 
Hawn, S. S. Curry, Barry, and others. Director of St. Mary's, 1910 — ) 



®iiktv&, 1910=11 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector. 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal. 

Mrs. LAVINIA C. GRETTER Matron. 

Miss EVA HARDESTY Housekeeper. 

Miss LOLA E. WALTON Matron of the Infirmary. 

Dr. A. W. KNOX School Physician. 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Business Manager. 

Miss LIZZIE H. LEE Bookkeeper. 

Miss JULIET B. SUTTON Stenographer. 

Mrs. MARY IREDELL Agent of the Trustees. 



THE COMMENCEMENT AWARDS OF 1910 

GRADUATES. 
The College Class of 1910. 

Mary Mitchell Chamberlain West Raleigh, N. C. 

Julia Fisher Coke Raleigh, N. C. 

Grace Trueman Deaton Raleigh, N. C. 

Irma Deaton Raleigh, N. G. 

Lena Payne Everett Rockingham, N. C. 

Minnie Tamplet Hazard Georgetown, 8. C. 

Paula Elizabeth Hazard (First Honor) Georgetown, S. G. 

Alice Leigh Hines Kinston, N. C. 

Sarah Vernon Holloway Enfield, N. G. 

Nannie Davis Lee Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Ruth Mardre Windsor, N. G. 

Laura Meares Asheville, N. C. 

Alice Noble Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Virginia Randolph Boiling Pickel (Second Honor), Raleigh, N. C. 

Ida Jean Rogerson Edenton, N. G. 

Ha Adele Rountree Wilmington, N. C. 

Rebecca Hill Shields Scotland Neck, N. G. 

Mary Campbell Shuford Hickory, N. G. 

CERTIFICATES. 

Certificate in the English Course. 
Jane Porcher DuBose Columbia, 8. C. 

Certificates in the Music Department. 

in PIANO. 

Ella Dorroh Greenville, 8. C. 

Rebecca Hill Shields Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Mary Campbell Shuford Hickory, N. C. 

IN ORGAN. 

Ha Adele Rountree Wilmington, N. G. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 9 

Diplomas in the Business Department. 

Fannie Lamb Haughton Washington, N. C. 

Emma Isabel Haynes Raleigh, N. G. 

Kate McMackin McDonald Raleigh, N. C. 

Eliza Pender Tarboro, N. C. 

Certificate in the Business Department. 

in bookkeeping. 
Katherine Sanderson Small Washington, N. C. 

W$t Honor &oll 

The highest general award of merit open to all Upper Pre- 
paratory and College pupils is the Honor Roll. The require- 
ments are: 

( 1 ) The pupil must have been in attendance the entire ses- 
sion and have been absent from no duty at any time during the 
session without the full consent of the Eector, and with lawful 
excuse. 

(2) She must have had during the year a full regular course 
of study or its equivalent, and have carried this work to suc- 
cessful completion, taking all required examinations. 

(3) She must have maintained a record of "Very Good" (90 
per cent) or better in her studies. 

(4) She must have had a record of "Excellent" in Deport- 
ment. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory bear- 
ing in the affairs of her school life during the year. 

The Honor Boll op 1910. 
Helen Caldwell Areson. Virginia Bandolph Boiling Pickel. 

Mary Mitchell Chamberlain. Mary Gladys Redwood. 
Julia Fisher Coke. Ha Adele Rountree. 

Irma Deaton. Rebecca Hill Shields. 

Ella Dorroh. Bertha Helena Smith. 

Paula Elizabeth Hazard. Florence Douglas Stone. 
Alice Leigh Hines. Frances Strong. 

Rebecca Merritt. Josephine TonnorTski. 

Mary Alice Perry. Rebecca Bennehan Wood. 

Alice Noble. 

2 



10 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

iPrimarp department 

The Roll of Honor. 
Elizabeth McMorine Folk. Virginia Royster. 

Katharine Hughes. Lucy Fitzhugh Lay. 

Alice Giersch. 

To be Commended for Progress in the Studies of the 
Department. 

Florence Leftwich Harrison. Lillias Shepherd. 

Special 1$xi}t& 

The Muse Prizes. 
The Muse prizes — copies of the annual Muse — presented by 
the Managers of the Muse to the students who by their written 
or artistic contributions have done most to help the annual 
and monthly Muse during the current year, were awarded in 
1910 to— 

NELL BATTLE LEWIS— for her work in illustrating the Annual Muse; 

and to 
ELIZABETH HUGHES— for her work on the monthly Muse. 

The Bishop Parker Botany Prize. 

The Bishop Parker Botany Prize, given by Rt. Rev. Edward 
M. Parker, Bishop Coadjutor of New Hampshire, is awarded 
to that pupil who in accordance with certain published condi- 
tions does the best work in the preparation of an herbarium. 
The prize in 1910 was awarded to 

Nell Battle Lewis. 
With honorable mention of 

Elizabeth Atkinson Lay. 

Gtfje i£tle$ Jflebal 

The highest award for the work of the session as determined 
by a comparison of general averages is the Niles Medal. 

The Niles Medal for General Excellence was instituted in 
1906 by the Reverend Charles Martin Niles, D.D. It is 
awarded to the pupil who has made the best record in scholar- 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 11 

ship and deportment during the session, subject to the follow- 
ing conditions: 

The requirements for eligibility are: 

( 1 ) The pupil must have taken throughout the year at least 
15 points of regular work; and have satisfactorily completed 
this work, passing all required examinations. 

(2) The pupil must have been Excellent in Deportment. 

(3) The pupil must have taken all regular general courses 
assigned and done satisfactory work in them. 

(4) The pupil must be a regular student of the College De- 
partment. The Medal is awarded to the same pupil only once. 

The highest average of the year 1909-10 was that of Miss 
Paula Elizabeth Hazard, Class of 1910, of Georgetown, S. C, 
whose average was 95.83 per cent. Miss Hazard was awarded 
the medal in 1907, when it was awarded for the second time, 
and was accordingly not eligible to receive it again. 

The medal was accordingly awarded to Miss Virginia Ran- 
dolph Boiling Pickel, Class of 1910, of Raleigh, N. C, whose 
average was 95.44 per cent. 






REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1910-11 

Allen, Martha Raleigh, N. C. 

Archey, Helen Frances Concord, N. G. 

Arthur, Bessie Wilson Union, S. C. 

Ashe, Nannie Branch Raleigh, N. G. 

Ashe, Windham Theodosia Trapier Raleigh, N. C. 

Baber, Yvonne Marie Chihuahua, Mexico. 

Bacot, Daisy Raleigh, N. C. 

Bagwell, Addie Daniels Raleigh, N. C. 

Bailey, Martha Hawkins Raleigh, N. C. 

Baker, Elizabeth Whiteley Raleigh, N. C. 

Baker, Katherine Haywood Raleigh, N. C. 

Baker, Rebecca Marion Raleigh, N. C. 

Ball, Laura Josephine Raleigh, N. C. 

Barbee, Adelyn Andrews Raleigh, N. C. 

Barber, Margaret Taylor North Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Barnwell, Elizabeth Stateburg, S. C. 

Barton, Beatrice Farmington, Conn. 

Bass, Bessie White Raleigh, N. C. 

Bencini, Robah Kerner High Point, N. C. 

Bernard, Louise White '. .Raleigh, N. C. 

Blackmer, Margaret Brent Salisbury, N. C. 

Borden, Julia Goldsboro, N. C. 

Bouknight, Emma Bettis Trenton, S. C. 

Bowen, Eunice Woodward West Raleigh, N. C. 

Bowen, Isabelle Worth West Raleigh, N. C. 

Bradshaw, Edith High Point, N. C. 

Brady, Lucile Chandler Henderson, N. C. 

Bragaw, Katherine Blount Washington, N. G. 

Branham, Ruth Louise .Tampa, Fla. 

Broadfoot, Margaret Strange Fayetteville, N. C. 

Broadwood, Hilda Blanche Mobile, Ala. 

Brown, Dorothy Valentine Rutherford, N. J. 

Brown, Margaret Canton, Ga. 

Bruce, Katharine Marsden Portsmouth, Va. 

Burfoot, Ada Aydlett Elizabeth City, N. G. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 13 

Busbee, Sophie D Raleigh, N. C. 

Butler, Mary Brown Henderson, N. C. 

Cain, Mary M Raleigh, N. C. 

Cameron, Isabella Mayo Raleigh, N. C. 

Cameron, Sallie Taliaferro Raleigh, N. C. 

Chamberlain, Mary Mitchell West Raleigh, N. C. 

Cherry, Elizabeth Raleigh, N. C. 

Clarkson, Amelia Garden Wateree, S. G. 

Coke, Julia Fisher Raleigh, N. G. 

Cooper, Julia Horner Oxford, N. G. 

Cooper, Mary Hazel Earnest, N. G. 

Cooper, Sophronia Moore Oxford, N. C. 

Crews, Grace Kearney Raleigh, N. G. 

Critz, Ruth Reynolds Winston-Salem, N. G. 

Cross, Elizabeth Raleigh, N. C. 

Cuthbert, Anna Baskerville Petersburg, Va. 

Davis, Eleanor Florence Henderson, N. G. 

Davis, Elvira Belle Henderson, N. G. 

Divine, Virginia Stella Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Dortch, Elizabeth Raleigh, N. G. 

Dortch, Lucy Bayard Raleigh, N. G. 

DuBose, Beverly Columbia, S. G. 

Eason, Jessie Delia Clayton, N. C. 

Edens, Anna Margaret Clio, S. C. 

Elias, Miguel Raleigh, N. C. 

Emery, Margaret Charlotte, N. 0. 

Erwin, Bessie Smedes Durham, N. G. 

Erwin, Margaret Locke Durham, N. G. 

Fenner, Sarah Baker Raleigh, N. G. 

Ferebee, Katie Attmore Aurora, N. C. 

Field, Anne Brumby Marietta, Ga. 

Fitchett, Frances Elizabeth Cape Charles, Va. 

Fletcher, Margaret Schouler Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Folk, Elizabeth McMorine Raleigh, N. C. 

Fowle, Mary Grist Washington, N. G. 

Fuller, Viola Beatrice Southern Pines, N. C. 

Gaither, Mary Skinner Hertford, N. C. 

Gary, Annie Ruth Henderson, N. C. 

Gibbs, Nina Farrow Oriental, N. C. 



14 8T. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Giersch, Alice May Raleigh, N. C. 

Gilbert, Frederika Mary Lolo, Mont. 

Green, Millian Cooke Denver, Colo. 

Gregory, Blanche Henderson, N. C. 

Griffith, Laura Washington Charlotte, N. C. 

Grubb, Beulah Linwood, N. G. 

Grubb, Edna Linwood, N. C. 

Gwynn, Alice Brevard Tallahassee, Fla. 

Haigh, Marion Taylor Fayetteville, N. C. 

Harrell, Jane Alexine Cheraw, S. C. 

Harris, Jennie Dick Atlanta, Ga. 

Harris, Martha Timberlake Franklinton, N. C. 

Harris, Olive Reidsville, N. C. 

Harrison, Agnes Tinsley Atlanta, Ga. 

Harrison, Florence Leftwich Raleigh, N. C. 

Harrison, Lucy Garrett Enfield, N. C. 

Hawkins, Catherine Estelle Greensboro, N. C. 

Hawkins, Catherine London Jacksonville, Fla. 

Henderson, Elizabeth Byrd Asheville, N. C. 

Hendricks, Nellie Marshall, N. C. 

Herbert, Leone Kathleen Morehead City, N. C. 

Hey ward, Sara Kirk Beaufort, S. C. 

Hill, Randolph Isabel West Raleigh, N. C. 

Hodgson, Mary Frances Jacksonville, Fla. 

Hoke, Mary McBee Raleigh, N. C. 

Holman, Bertha Belo Raleigh, N. C. 

Hopkins, Dorothy Nottingham Onancock, Va. 

Hoppe, Laura Margaret Marietta, Ga. 

Hughes, Elizabeth Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Hughes, Katharine Dorothy Raleigh, N. C. 

Hughes, Martha Elizabeth Raleigh, N. C. 

Huttenhauer, Virginia Frances Southern Pines, N. C. 

Jackson, Helen Petersburg, Va. 

Jackson, Jennie Brodie Warrenton, N. C. 

Jerman, Julia Borden Raleigh, N. C. 

Johnson, Elizabeth Murray Raleigh, N. C. 

Jones, Caroline Clarke Charlotte, N. C. 

Jones, Hortense Haughton Asheville, N. C. 

Jones, Ina Hoskins Raleigh, N. C. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 15 

Josey, Nannie Louise Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Kitchin, Sue Arrington Raleigh, N. C. 

Knox, Emilie Rose Raleigh, N. C. 

Kyle, Frances Decatur, Ala. 

Lassiter, Kathryn Blount Hertford, N. C. 

Lay, Anna Rogers Raleigh, N. C. 

Lay, Elizabeth Atkinson Raleigh, N. C. 

Lay, Ellen Booth Raleigh, N. G. 

Lay, Lucy Fitzhugh Raleigh, N. 0. 

Leak, Effie Shepherd Wadesboro, N. C. 

Leard, Margaret Agnes Raleigh, N. C. 

Leary, Elizabeth Woodard Edenton, N. C. 

Lee, Lizzie Hinton (2d) Raleigh, N. O. 

Lee, Nannie Davis Raleigh, N. C. 

Lee, Ruth Addison Raleigh, N. G. 

Lewis, Nell Battle Raleigh, N. C. 

Lilly, Frances Hinsdale Fayetteville, N. 0. 

Linehan, Marie Dorothea Raleigh, N. C. 

Linthicum, Muriel Elizabeth Atlanta, Ga. 

Lloyd, Elise Randolph Durham, N. C. 

Lockhart, Caroline Ashe Wadesboro, N. C. 

Mann, Eleanor Vass Raleigh, N . G. 

Manning, Mary Louise Durham, N. G. 

Marriott, Emily Battleboro, N. G. 

Maxwell, Evelyn Croom Pensacola, Fla. 

Meares, Jane Iredell Wilmington, N. G. 

Merritt, Mary Rebecca Raleigh, N. C. 

Mewborn, Meta Kinston, N. C. 

Miller, Fannie Butler Trenton, S. C. 

Miller, Henry Grady Raleigh, N. C. 

Mitchell, Mary Gibbs Greenville, S. G. 

Morris, Elizabeth Belief onte, Pa. 

McArthur, Helen Elizabeth Winston-Salem, N. G. 

McClenaghan, C. Trenholm Raleigh, N. G. 

McComb, Gertrude Elizabeth Jacksonville, Fla. 

McCullers, Melba Clayton, N. C. 

McDonald, Flora Raleigh, N. C. 

McGehee, Anne Ludlow Chapel Hill, N. C. 

McGehee, Mary Polk Chapel Hill, N. C. 



16 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Mclver, Susie Cheraw, S. C. 

McKimmon, Anne Raleigh, N. C. 

McMullan, Fannie Old Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Northen, Margaret Swift Atlanta, Ga. 

Northrop, Florie Wright Wilmington, N. C. 

Northrop, Kate Cumming Wilmington, N . C. 

Owen, Mary Hancock Guatemala, Central America. 

Park, Frances Caroline West Raleigh, N. C. 

Parker, Kathryn DeRosset Princeton, N. J. 

Parker, Lula Everett West Raleigh, N. C. 

Peabody, Carrie Burrus Atlanta, Ga. 

Peace, Bessie Fitzhugh Watha, N. C. 

Pender, Katherine Marriott Tarboro, N. C. 

Perry, Isabelle Hester Henderson, N. C. 

Pickel, Marion C Raleigh, N. C. 

Pittenger, Paul Nathaniel Raleigh, N. C. 

Pratt, Frances Roberta Efland, N. C. 

Prettyman, Virginia Selden Summerville, S. C. 

Pugh, Lois Savannah, Ga. 

Quince, Margaret Wilmington, N . C. 

Rawlings, Susan Porter Wilson, N. C. 

Reese, Agnes Savannah, Ga. 

Reynolds, Virginia Sumter, S. C. 

Robinson, Helen Virgilia Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Rogers, Joanna Elizabeth Jacksonville, Fla. 

Rogers, Margaret Raleigh, N. C. 

Royster, Virginia Page Raleigh, N. C. 

Russ, Bettie Raleigh, N. C. 

Sanders, Louise Raleigh, N. C. 

Schwartz, Henrietta Raleigh, N. C. 

Scobell, Helen Isabell Chihuahua, Mexico. 

Shepherd, Lillias McDaniel Raleigh, N. C. 

Shield, Anne Dupree Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Shull, Zona May Missoula, Mont. 

Silver, Kate Hale Morganton, N. C. 

Sims, Janie Ruffin Maxwelton, Va. 

Small, Katherine Sanderson Washington, N. C. 

Smith, Effie Rebecca Raleigh, N. C. 

Smith, Elizabeth Maund Wilmington, N. C. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 17 

Smith, Josephine Valentine Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Smith, Kate Watson Selma, Ala. 

Smith, Katherine Dilworth Birmingham, Ala. 

Smith, Olive Ernestine Washington, D. G. 

Smith, Patsey Harry Raleigh, N. 0. 

Stone, Florence Douglas Raleigh, N. 0. 

Stovall, Pleasant Savannah, Ga. 

Strong, Anna Cowan Raleigh, N. C. 

Strong, Frances Lambert Raleigh, N. C. 

Sturgeon, Amelia Pinckney Gary, N. G. 

Tarry, Elizabeth Anderson Woodworth, N. G. 

Taylor, Mary Anna Oxford, N C. 

Taylor, Nannie Davis Beaufort, N. G. 

Telfair, Elizabeth Alexander Raleigh, N. G. 

Terrell, Marjory Brewster Raleigh, N. G. 

Thomas, Marie Jacquelin Charlotte, N. C. 

Thompson, Elizabeth Warren Raleigh, N. C. 

Tonnoffski, Josephine Pearle Raleigh, N. G. 

Tucker, Marie Octavia Pine Bluff, N. C. 

Turner, Catherine Blakeslee Monteagle, Tenn. 

Tyson, Mary Glenn Carthage, N. G. 

Vann, Jessica Washington, N. C. 

Vaughan, Eva Baker South Boston, Va. 

Warren, Myrtle Greenville, N. G. 

Webb, Adriana Houston, Va. 

Webb, Ovid Houston, Va. 

Wells, Euth Morrill Columbia, S. C. 

Westervelt, Irving Gaillard Greenville, S. C. 

White, Bessie Elisabeth City, N. C. 

Williams, Elinor Forniss Fort Screven, Ga. 

Williams, Julia Ringwood, N. G. 

Williams, Sadie Augusta, Ga. 

Williams, Willie Simpson Ringwood, N. G. 

Williamson, Ethel Blount Graham, N. C. 

Williford, Josephine Elizabeth Raleigh, N. G. 

Williford, Mildred Prince Raleigh, N. G. 

Wilson, Mary Blackburn Rock Hill, 8. G. 

Winslow, Bessie Blount Hertford, N. C. 



18 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Winston, Amabel Conyers Raleigh, N. G. 

Wood, Edna Louise Charleston, S. C. 

Wood, Mary John Raleigh, N. C. 

Wood, Rebecca Bennehan Edenton, N. C. 

Woodruff, Jennie Summerville, S. C. 

Woodson, Carol Birmingham, Ala. 

Wright, Helen Cherry Boardman, N. C. 

Wright, Martha Bowden Boardman, N. C. 

Yates, Mildred Johns West Raleigh, N. C. 



General ^cfjool &egulattong for $kjarbing $uptte 

1. Attendance. All pupils are required to ar- 
rive in time for the opening of the School session and 
to remain until its close. 

2. Holiday. The only recess, or holiday, when 
pupils are allowed to leave the School, is at the time 
of the Christmas vacation. 

This holiday, as a rule, is of two weeks' duration. 
The whole School is expected to be present on time at 
the close of the Christmas vacation. 

3. Absence. With the exception noted below, 
pupils are not allowed to leave the School except in 
cases of severe illness or for some other reason so 
serious as to seem sufficient to the Rector. The ap- 
plication should be made directly by the parent to 
the Rector, in writing, if possible. 

Exception. If the pupil's record warrants it, the 
Rector will allow a pupil one or two visits a year to 
her home, simply on the request of the parent that she 
be allowed to do so, the pupil leaving the School after 
3 p. m. Saturday and returning the following Monday 
evening. The request should be made at least a week 
beforehand. 

While the Rector ivill cheerfully grant such per- 
missions, in a session of only thirty-two weeks with a 
recess at Christmas, all such absences are highly unde- 
sirable for the sake of the pupil and the whole school. 

No such permission whatever can be allowed with- 



20 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

in one week of Thanksgiving Day, or Washington's 
Birthday, or from Palm Sunday to Easter inclusive. 

4. Visits. The presence of a parent in Raleigh 
does not in any respect absolve a pupil from any regu- 
lations of the School without permission from the 
Rector, and obedience to the conditions governing 
such permissions is a matter between the pupil and 
the Rector alone. The Rector is glad to have parents 
visit their daughters in Raleigh as often and for as 
long a time as may be convenient to them, and he will 
take pleasure in granting all possible privileges, not 
inconsistent with the welfare of the School, to enable 
parent and daughter to see each other. In general, 
pupils are not excused during school hours, and no 
exception is made to this, except where a parent from 
a distance happens to stop over in Raleigh for only an 
hour or two. Except for very serious necessity, pa- 
rents are urgently requested not to ask that their 
daughters come to the Railway Station to meet them. 
ISTo pupil is allowed to spend the night outside of the 
School except with her mother, or one who sustains 
a mother's relation to her. 

5. Chapel. All boarding pupils are required to 
attend all Chapel services. 

6. Rooms. In assigning pupils to rooms, the Rec- 
tor does not waive the right to change a pupil, at any 
time, from a room to a dormitory, if in his judgment 
it is best for the discipline of the School. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 21 

With regard to discipline, it is desired to have as 
few rules, and to grant as many privileges as possible. 
But in so large a community the rules must be obeyed 
and enforced uniformly and the privileges 'must be 
withdrawn, if they are abused or work injury to the 
individual and the School, and it must be remembered 
that no privilege can be allowed to any one which 
could not, under similar circumstances, be allowed to 
all who ask for it. In working together for the good 
of the whole School both parents and the School au- 
thorities will in the end succeed best in securing the 
good of each individual. 

JUqutStteg 

Boarding pupils are expected to bring with them — 
Bed-linen for single bed, 
4 sheets, 54 x 90, 
3 pillow-cases, 19 x 34, 
2 counterpanes, white, 
1 pair blankets, 
6 towels, 

6 napkins and ring, 
Cloak or cape, 
Umbrella, 
Overshoes. 
These, and all articles of clothing, must be dis- 
tinctly marked with the owner's name. 

Teachers are expected to furnish the same requi- 
sites for their apartments. 



TERMS 

All regular fees are due and must be paid quarterly 
in advance. 

Pupils are required to register at the beginning of 
each half-year, and no pupil will be allowed to regis- 
ter until all past fees have been paid. 

Pupils are not received for less than a half-year, 
or the remainder of a half-year. As a matter of sim- 
ple justice to the School, parents are asked to give 
ample notice of intention to withdraw a pupil at the 
end of the half-year. 

JSTo deduction is made for holidays or for absence 
or withdrawal of pupils from school, except in cases 
of protracted sickness. In cases of absence or with- 
drawal for protracted sickness the School and the 
parent will divide losses for the remainder of the 
half-year. 

(Entrance 

An Entrance Fee is required of all boarding pupils 
at the time of filing application for entrance, as a 
guarantee for holding place. This fee is in no case 
returned, but on the entrance of the pupil is credited 
to her regular account. 

The Entrance Fee to reserve an alcove in one of 
the Dormitories is $5. 

The Entrance Fee to reserve a room-place in East 
Eock House, West Eock House, Main Building, or 
North Dormitory is $10. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 23 

The Entrance Fee to reserve a room-place in East 
Wing or West Wing is $25. 

The difference in charge for the various rooms, cor- 
responding to their desirability and location, is made 
largely for the convenience of patrons. The uniform 
charge in the past has led to some misunderstanding. 
It is hoped that the remittance of a definite fee, 
graded according to location, will obviate all difficul- 
ties. 

Regular Charge* 

Boarding Pupils. — The regular charge for the 
school year is $281, including an alcove in one of the 
Dormitories for which there is no extra charge. This 
includes all living expenses (except Room-rent for 
pupils in rooms) and all regular school fees in the 
Academic or Business Departments. Charges in the 
Music, Art and Elocution Departments are extra. 
There is no extra charge for languages. 

Pupils occupying room-places in East Wing or 

West Wing are charged $25 room rent; in the other 

buildings $10. 

The regular charge for the school year includes: 

Board, light, fuel, alcove $200 

Academic Tuition 50 

Laundry 20 

Contingent, Medical and Library Fees 11 

$281 
Room-rent, according to room $10 or 25 



24 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Local Pupils. — The full regular charge is $53.50. 

Academic Tuition $50.00 

Contingent Fee 2.50 

Library Fee 1.00 

$53.50 
Pupils of the Primary Department are charged 



Cxtra Cijargeg 

iHluBiic department 

Piano, Organ, or Violin _ $50 

If from the Director 60 

Vocal 60 

Use of Piano for practice 5 

Use of Organ for practice 10 

This charge is for one hour's practice each school day 
during the session. Additional practice is charged for at 
the same rates. 

Theory of Music, History of Music, or Harmony 10 
Music pupils are required to take one of these three subjects. 

girt Jlepartment 

Drawing, etc. $30 

Painting in oil or water-color 50 

Art History 10 

Work in special classes at special rates. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 25 

JButfineftS department 
Kegular tuition $50 

This includes any or all of the business branches with 
English and Arithmetic. No reduction is made for a partial 
course, except as follows: 

Typewriting alone $15 

Bookkeeping alone 25 

The fee includes the use of typewriter. 

"Expression ^Department 

Private Lessons $50 

Lessons in Class 10 

Occasional Jfees 

Laboratoey Fee. — A fee of from $3 to $5 is 

charged pupils using the Science Laboratory. 

This fee is to cover cost of material and varies with the 
course. 

Graduation Fee. — A fee of $2 is charged each 
pupil receiving a diploma in any department ; and a 
fee of $1 is charged each pupil receiving a Certifi- 
cate. 

Snctbental Cfjarge* 

These are not properly school charges, but are sim- 
ply charges for materials or money which the school 
furnishes to the pupil as a convenience to the parent. 

A statement of the Incidental Account is sent quar- 
terly. 

Parents are requested to make an Incidental De- 
posit to cover the cost of materials bought by the 
school and furnished to the pupils, and also to provide 



26 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

pocket-money. As these charges will vary with need, 
no definite statement can be made, but ordinarily 
$25 for the year will be sufficient in addition to the 
allowance for pocket-money. 

Sheet Music and Art Materials are furnished by 
the school and charged at cost. 

Books and stationery will be furnished by the 
school if a deposit is made for this purpose. 

It is advisable that the pocket-money should be fur- 
nished only through the Rector, and it is urged that 
the amount should not exceed one dollar a week. 

explanatory Statement of Regular Cfjargcs; 

The regular charges given in concise form on page 23 may be 
further explained as follows: 

Academic Tuition. — The charge ($50) is the 
same for a full course or a partial course. 

A pupil, however, taking only one or two classes is 
charged $20 a class. 

Laundry. — The laundry fee for the year is I 
For this each pupil is allowed an average of $1.5( 
worth of laundry each week, or $48 worth for the 
year, at regular laundry prices. Additional pieces 
are charged extra at half rates. Laundry lists with 
prices will be sent on request. Pupils are expected 
to limit the number of fancy pieces. 

Contingent Fee. — An annual contingent fee of 
$5 for house pupils and $2.50 for day pupils is 
charged all pupils. 

Medical Fee. — All boarding pupils will pay a 
Medical Fee of $5 for the year. This fee entitles 



ST. MARTS SCHOOL BULLETIN. 27 

the pupils to the attention of the School Physician in 
all cases of ordinary sickness, and to such ordinary 
medical supplies as may be needed without further 
charge. All special prescriptions are charged extra. 

Pupils whose parents prefer to have some other 
than the School Physician may, with the Rector's con- 
sent, call in some other reputable physician at their 
own expense. 

Library. — An annual fee of $1 is charged all 
pupils for the use of the library. 

iDrbuctions 

A deduction of 10 per cent in the tuition charge is made in 
the case of pupils who take Vocal and Instrumental Music, 
Piano and Elocution, Music and Art, and like combinations. 
This deduction is made only to pupils who pay Academic 
tuition. 

A deduction of $20 for the year is made in the charges when 
two or more boarding pupils enter from the same family. 

A deduction of 10 per cent of the tuition charge is made 
when two or more day pupils enter from the same family. 

These deductions are all conditional on the hill being paid 
in advance. 



Bt Jflarp'js 

Wot Btocesfan ££>cf)ool ( for &ivlg ) of tfjc Carolina* 



The 70th session of St. Mary's School begins Sep- 
tember 21, 1911. 

Easter Term begins January 25, 1912. 



For Bulletins and other information, address 
Rev. GEORGE W. LAY, 

Rectos. 






COWARDS * BROUQHTON PRINTING CO., RALEIGH, It. 0. 



July, 1911 Series I, No. 21 



BULLETIN 



RALEGH, N. C. 



Catalogue Mumbtx 



Published Quarterly by St. Mary's School 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. C, as Second Class Mattes 
Under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



&t. Max?* &cij " 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Founded in 1842 by Aldert Smede i D O 




Rev. GEORGE W. LAY iector 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS I- - (vi ncipal 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK .... Secretary ami B M mager 






3ulp, 1011 



ferfra t, 5Jn. 21 



1 ilanj'0 ^rtfonl 



BULLETIN 




daialogue Jfambrr 



•publish (fuarterli} by 0?L DHarg'a Btfyaal 

J&alzitfb, Jlortf) Carolina 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. C, as Second Glass Mattee 
Undeb Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



CALENDAR 


1911 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


S 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S 


M|T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


TIF 


S 


M 


T 


WT 


F 


S 


S 


M 


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WIT IF 




1 


2 3 


4 


5 


6 


7 










1 












1 


1 


2 


3 


4 5! 6 


7 


8 9110 


11 


12 


13 


14 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6l 7 


8 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 


8 


9 


10 


111213 


14 


1516 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13114 


15 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 


14 


15 


15 


16 


17 


1819J20 


21 


2223 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


16 


17 


18 


19 


2021 


22 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 


21 


22 


22 


23 


24 


252627 


28 


2930 


31 










23 

30 


24 


25 


26 


272829 

1 1 


23 
30 


24 25 
31| 


26 27 
1 


28 


29 


29 


30 


31 






FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


1 | 


1 


2 


3 


4 




1 


21 3 


41 51 6 




[ 1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


I 




1 


2; 3 


4 


5 6| 7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


7 


8 


9 10 


11 12'l3 


6 


7i 8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


If 6 


7 


8 


910 


11 


121314 


15 


16 


17 


18 


14 


15 


16 17 


1819,20 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


1213 


14 


15 


1617 


18 


19 


20|21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


21 


22 


23 24 


25 26,27 


20 


2122 


23 


24 


25 


26 


19 20 


21 


■?:? 


23 : 5>4 


25 


26 


27128 










28 


29 


3031 






|27 


28'29 


30 


31 






26,27 


28 


29 


30 




MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 






1 


2 


3 


4 










1 


2 


3 










1 


2 


i 








1 


2 


5 61 7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


3l 4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


121314 


15 


16 


17 


18 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


10J11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


192021 


22 


23 


24 


25 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


1718 


19 


20 


21 


?,?, 


23 


26 2728 


29 


30 


31 




I 25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




24 


25 


26 


2*7 


28 


» 


30 


2425 
1 3l| 


26 


27 


28! 29 

I 


30 


1912 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


S 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


M|T 


W 


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F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 




1 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


1213 


7 


8 9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


14 


15 


1617 


18 


1920 


14 


1516 


17 


18 


19 


20 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


2122 23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


21 


22 


23:24 


25 


26,27 


21 


22 23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


20 21 


n 


23 


24 


as 


26 


28 


29 30 

1 


31 








28 


29 


30 








28 


29,30 


31 








27 

] 


2S 


29 


30 


31 






FEBRUARY 




MAY 


AUGUST 


VOVEMBER 








11 2 


3 








1 


2 


3 


4 










11 21 3 










1 1 


2 


4| 5| 6 


7 


8 9 


10 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 910 


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Calendar for 191 14912 



1911. 

September 18, Monday Faculty assemble at St. Mary's. 

September 19, Tuesday Registration and Classification of City 

Pupils; New Boarding Pupils report by 
7 p. m. 

September 20, Wednesday Preliminary Examinations; Old Boarding 

Pupils report by 7 p. m.: Registration and 
Classification of Boarding Pupils. 

September 21, Thursday Opening Service of Advent Term (First 

Half-year) at 9 a. m. 

November 1, Wednesday All Saints: Founders' Day. 

November 23, Thursday Second Quarter begins. 

November 30-- - Thanksgiving Day. 

December 15 — January 3 Christmas Recess. 

1912. 

January 3, Wednesday All pupils report by 7 p. m. 

January 25, Thursday Easter Term (Second Half-year) begins. 

February 21, Ash Wednesday Lent begins. 

March 21, Thursday Last Quarter Begins. 

March 31, Palm Sunday Annual Visit of the Bishop for Confirms 

tion. 

April 5, Good Friday Holy Day. 

May 12, Sunday .- Alumnae Day: 70th Anniversary of the 

Founding of St. Mary's. 

May 16, Thursday . Ascension Day. 

May 26 — May 28.. Commencement Season. 

September 19, Thursday. 71st Session Begins. 

No absence from the school is allowed at or near Thanksgiving 
Day, Washington's Birthday, or from Palm Sunday to Easter 
inclusive. The only recess is at Christmas. 



Snbex. 

Page. 

The Calendar for 1911-12 3 

The Board of Trustees 5 

The Faculty and Officers for 1911-12 6 

History and Description of the School 9 

Location 12 

Equipment 13 

The Life 16 

The School Work 19 

The Student Organizations 20 

Work of the Departments 23 

Upper Preparatory 24 

The College 24 

Admission 25 

Certificates 28 

Examination, Special Courses, Classification 29 

Graduation 30 

Awards -- 31 

Requirements for Certificates and Credits 33 

The Regular Academic Course 35 

General Courses 38 

The Courses in Detail 40 

History 40 

English and Literature 42 

Foreign Languages, Ancient and Modern 44 

Mathematics 49 

Natural Science 51 

Philosophy 53 

Bible Study 54 

Department of Music 55 

The Courses 62 

Art Department. 66 

Business Department 68 

Elocution Department 71 

Domestic Science 72 

General Regulations 73 

Terms 78 

Scholarships 83 

The Alumnae 85 



W$t poarb of Gfrugteeg 



£J)e JliSfjopg 

Rt. Ret. Jos. Blount Cheshire, D.D., Chairman Raleigh, N. C. 

Rt. Ret. Robt. Strange, D.D Wilmington, N. C. 

Rt. Ret. Wm. Alexander Guerry Charleston, S. C. 

Rt. Ret. Junius M. Horner Aahevllle, N. C. 

Clerical anil Hap ^Trustees 

NORTH CAROLINA. 
Ret. M. A. Barber, Raleigh. Ret. J. E. Ingle, Henderson. 

Ret. Harris Mallinckrodt, Charlotte. Dr. R. H. Lewis, Raleigh. 
Col. Chas. E. Johnson, Raleigh. Hon. R. H. Battle, Raleigh. 

Mr. W. A. Erwin, Durham. Mr. D. Y. Cooper, Henderson, 

(until 1915.) (until 1912.) 

EAST CAROLINA. 
Ret. R. B. Drane, D.D., Edenton. Ret. T. P. Noe, Wilmington. 

Mr. Frank Wood, Edenton. Mr. Geo. C. Royall, Goldsboro. 

(until 1915.) (until 1912.) 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 
Ret. T. T. Walsh, YorkTille. Ret. L. G. Wood, Charleston. 

Mr. P. T. Hatne, GreenTille. Mr. T. W. Bacot, Charleston, 

(until 1914.) (until 1914.) 

ASHEVILLE. 
Ret. W. H. Hardin, Gastonia. *Ret 

Hon. Wm. A. Hoke, Lincolnton. Mr. F. A. Clinard, Hickory, 

(until 1915.) (until 1912.) 

Cxecutibe Committee 

Rt. Ret. J. B. Cheshire, D.D., Chairman. 
Hon. R. H. Battle. Dr. R. H. Lewis. 

Col. Chas. E. Johnson. Mr. W. A. Erwin. 

Mr. George C. Royall. 

S>etretarp ana tEreasiurer 

Dr. K. P. Battle, Jr. 



♦Vacant. 



Cfje Jfacultp anb Officer* of B>t iHarp'si 
19114912 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Secretary 



GTfje !3cabemic Uepartnunt 
Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Bible, Ethics and Greek 

(A.B., Yale, 1882; B.D., General Theological Seminary, 1885; master 
in St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., 1888-1907. Rector of St. Mary's, 
1907—) 

ELEANOR W. THOMAS English and Literature 

(A.M., College for Women, S. C, 1900; summer student, Columbia 
University, N. Y., 1905; instructor, Greenville College, S. C, 1904. 
Instructor in St. Mary's, 190O-'O4; 1905—) 

WILLIAM E. STONE History and German 

(A.B., Harvard, 1882; principal, Edenton, N. C, Academy, 1901-02; 
master in Porter Academy, Charleston, 1902-'03. Instructor in St. 
Mary's, 1903—) 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Science 

(A.B., Washington College, Md., 1897; A.M., 1898; graduate student 
Johns Hopkins University, 1900. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1903 — ) 

HELEN URQUHART Latin 

(A.B., Mount Holyoke, 1910. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1910—) 

MARGARET RICKS Mathematics 

(A. B., Converse College, 1907; A. M., Georgetown College (Ky.), 1911; 
student at Knoxville Summer School. Instructor, St. Mary's, 1911 — ) 

ELIZABETH P. SKINNER French 

(Graduate, St. Mary's, 1904; student, Columbia University Summer 
School; instructor, Raleigh High School, 1906-10. Instructor, St. 
Mary's, 1911—) 

LOUISE A. WILSON English 

(A.B., Winthrop CoUege (S.C.), 1905; A.B., University of North Caro- 
lina, 1911. Instructor, St. Mary's, 1911—) 

FLORENCE C. DAVIS Elocution and Physical Culture 

(B.O., Emerson College, Boston, 1906; Elmira College; Posse Gym- 
nasium. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1911 — ) 

Domestic Science 

KATE McKIMMON Primary School 

(Student and teacher at St. Mary's since 1861.) 

MARY SULLY HAYWARD Preparatory Work 

(A. B., Hollins, 1909; instructor in Powhatan Institute (Va.), 1909-11. 
Instructor in St. Mary's, 1911. 

LOUISE HILL Assistant 

(Graduate of St. Mary's, 1907; teacher in Lexington, N. C, 1907-10. 
Assistant in St. Mary's, 1910 — ) 



jffiustc Separtment 

r Piano, Theory, 
MARTHA A. DOWD, Director { HigtOTy rf ^ 

(Graduate of St. Mary's, 1884; pupil of Kuersteiner, Sophus Wiig, Al- 
bert Mack. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1886—; Director of Music, 1908—) 

R. BLINN OWEN Id charge of Voice 

CM.Mus., Detroit School of Music; pupil of Zimmermann, Mazurette, 
Theo. Beach of Detroit; Kreutschmar, in New York; teacher in 
Detroit and New York; private teacher in Bluefield, W. Va., and 
Greensboro, N. C., 1906-09. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1909—) 

BERTHA MAY LUNEY Organ, Piano 

(Pupil of Hyatt and Becker at Syracuse University; Foote, of Troy; and 
Tipton, of the Albany Cathedral. Teacher in St. Mary's 1908 — ) 

BLANCHE L, CRAFTS Violin, Voice 

(B.Mus., New England Conservatory, 1905; pupil of Felix Winternitz, 
Josef Adamowski; teacher, New England Conservatory; private 
teacher, Boston; teacher, Wesleyan College (Ga.), Acadia Seminary 
(Canada), etc. Teacher, St. Mary's, 1911—) 

HERMINE R. SCHEPER Piano, Harmony 

(Graduate New England Conservatory; private student, New York 
City; teacher, Converse College, S. C; Hamilton Institute, Wash- 
ington; Elizabeth College, N. C. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1907—) 

CAROLINE N. DeROSSET Piano 

(Certificate in Piano, St. Mary's, 1906; Teachers' Certificate, Peabody 
Conservatory, Baltimore, 1910; teacher in Preparatory Depart- 
ment, Peabody Conservatory, 1910-11. Teacher, St. Mary's, 1911 — ) 

ELLA DORROH Piano 

(Certificate in Piano, St. Mary's, 1910; Diploma, 1911. Teacher, 1910—) 

9rt ^Department 

CLARA I. FENNER, Director { Rawing Painting, 

' ( Design, etc. 

(Graduate Maryland Institute, School of Art and Design; special student 
Pratt Institute, 1905; special student in Paris, 1907. Director of Art, 
St. Mary's, 1888-96; 1902—) 

elocution ^Department 
FLORENCE C. DAVIS Director 

(B.O., Emerson College, Boston, 1906; Elmira College (N. Y.), Posse 
Gymnasium, Boston; private studio, Elmira; substitute teacher, 
Miss Metcalf's School, Tarrytown, 1908; teacher, Reidsville Semi- 
nary (N. C), 1909-11. Director of Elocution, St. Mary's, 1911—) 

business; department 
Miss LIZZIE H. LEE, Director. . . { ^^keep^I' Typewriting, 

(Director of the Department, 1896 — ) 

Miss JULIET B. SUTTON Assistant. 

(Instructor in St. Mary's, 1898—) 



(MtcerS, 191 M2 

Eev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector 



Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal 

Supervising Housekeeper 

Assistant Housekeeper 

Miss LOLA E. WALTON Matron of the Infirmary 

Dr. A. W. KNOX School Physician 



ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Business Manager 

Miss LIZZIE H. LEE Bookkeeper 

Miss JULIET B. SUTTON Stenographer 



Mrs. MARY IREDELL Agent of the Trustees 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 



St. Mary's School 



iMsitorp anb Beacrtptton 

St. Mary's School was founded in May, 1 842, by the Rev. 
Aldert Smedes, D.D. 

It was established as a Church school for girls and was 
for thirty-six years the chosen work of the founder, of whose 
life work Bishop Atkinson said: "It is my deliberate judg- 
ment that Dr. Smedes accomplished more for the advance- 
ment of this Diocese (North Carolina), and for the promotion 
of the best interests of society in its limits, than any man 
who ever lived in it." 

The present location was first set apart as the site for an 
Episcopal school in 1 832, when influential churchmen, carry- 
ing out a plan proposed by Bishop Ives, purchased the pres- 
ent "Grove" as a part of a tract of 160 acres, to be used in 
establishing a Church school for boys. First the East Rock 
House, then West Rock House and the Main Building were 
built for use in this boys' school. But the school, though it 
started out with great promise, proved unsuccessful and was 
closed; and the property passed back into private hands. 

Dr. Aldert Smedes, a New Yorker by birth and education, 
had given up parish work on account of a weak throat, and 
was conducting a successful girls' school in New York City 
when in 1842 Bishop Ives met him and laid before him the 
opportunity in his North Carolina diocese. The milder 
climate attracted Dr. Smedes; he determined on the effort; 
came to Raleigh with a corps of teachers; gave St. Mary's its 
name, and threw open its doors in May, 1842. 

From the first the school was a success, and for the re- 
mainder of his life Dr. Smedes allowed nothing to interrupt 
the work he had undertaken. During the years of the War 
between the States St. Mary's was at the same time school 

2 



10 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

and refuge for those driven from their homes. It is a tra- 
dition of which her daughters are proud, that during those 
years of struggle her doors were ever open, and that at one 
time the family of the beloved President of the Confederacy 
were sheltered within her walls. 

On April 25, 1 877, Dr. Smedes died, leaving St. Mary's to 
the care of his son, Rev. Dr. Bennett Smedes, who had been 
during his father's lifetime a teacher in the school. This 
trust was regarded as sacred, and for twenty-two years, in 
which he spared neither expense nor pains, Dr. Bennett 
Smedes carried on his father's work for education. 

During this eventful half-century, St. Mary's was in the 
truest sense a Church school, but it was a private enterprise. 
The work and the responsibility were dependent upon the 
energy of the Drs. Smedes. Permanence required that the 
school should have a corporate existence and be established 
on a surer foundation as a power for good, and in 1897 Dr. 
Bennett Smedes proposed to the Diocese of North Carolina 
that the Church should take charge of the school. 

The offer was accepted; the Church assumed responsibility, 
appointed Trustees, purchased the school equipment from 
Dr. Smedes and the real property from Mr. Cameron; and 
in the fall of 1897 was granted a charter by the General 
Assembly. 

By this act of the Assembly, and its later amendments, the 
present corporation — The Trustees of St. Mary's School — 
consisting of the Bishops of the Church in the Carolinas, 
and clerical and lay trustees from each diocese or district, 
was created. 

The Board of Trustees, by the terms of the charter, is em- 
powered "to receive and hold lands of any value which may 
be granted, sold, devised or otherwise conveyed to said cor- 
poration, and shall also be capable in law to take, receive and 
possess all moneys, goods and chattels of any value and to 
any amount which may be given, sold or bequeathed to or 
for said corporation." 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 11 

The Church was without funds for the purchase of the 
school property, and the Trustees undertook a heavy debt 
in buying it, but the existence of this debt only slightly re- 
tarded the improvements which were made from year to year 
in the school buildings and equipment, and in May, 1906, 
the Trustees were able to announce that the purchase debt 
was lifted and the school was the unencumbered property of 
the Church in the Carolinas. 

Dr. Bennett Smedes, who had long wished for the dispo- 
sition of St. Mary's that was actually effected, continued as 
Rector after the Church assumed charge, until his death on 
February 22, 1899. To succeed him, the Trustees called 
the Rev. Theodore DuBose Bratton, Rector of the Church of 
the Advent, Spartanburg, S. C, and a teacher of long train- 
ing. In September, 1899, Dr. Bratton took charge, and for 
four years administered the affairs of the school very success- 
fully. In May, 1903, he was chosen Bishop of Mississippi. 
In September, 1903, the Rev. McNeely DuBose became 
Rector and the school continued its useful and successful 
career under his devoted care for four years, until he resigned 
in May, 1907, to resume parish work. In September, 1907, 
the Rev. George W. Lay assumed the management. 

Ctmcattonal position 

During the life of the founder, St. Mary's was a high-class 
school for the general education of girls, the training being 
regulated by the needs and exigencies of the times. Pupils 
finished their training without "graduating." In 1 879, under 
the second Rector, set courses were established, covering col- 
lege preparatory work without sacrificing the special features 
which the school stands for, and in May, 1 879, the first class 
was regularly graduated. 

By the provisions of the charter of 1897, the Faculty of 
St. Mary's, "with the advice and consent of the Board of 
Trustees, shall have the power to confer all such degrees and 
marks of distinction as are usually conferred by colleges and 



12 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

universities," and at the annual meeting in May, 1900, the 
Trustees determined to establish the College, in which the 
study of the Liberal Arts and Sciences might be pursued at 
St. Mary's on an equal standard with other colleges for 
women. In carrying out this idea the College was added 
to the Preparatory School. 

The College course is equal to that for which a A.B. degree 
is awarded at a large proportion of our Southern colleges for 
women; and, if the proper electives are chosen, prepares the 
graduates for entrance into the junior class of the best col- 
leges in the country. 

A graduate of St. Mary's receives a diploma; but it has 
been thought wise to confer no degree, although that power 
is specified in the charter. 

St. Mary's at present offers opportunity for continuous 
education from the primary grades through the college. 

But St. Mary's offers more than the opportunity for a 
thorough academic education. Supplementing the work of 
the Academic Department are the Departments of Music, 
Art, and Elocution, and the Business Department. 

The organization, requirements and courses of each of 
these departments are described at length in this catalogue. 

Eotation 

Raleigh, the Capital of North Carolina, is accessible by 
the Southern, the Seaboard Air Line and the Norfolk South- 
ern railroads from all directions, affording ready and rapid 
communication with all points in Florida and Georgia, in 
addition to easy access to points in the Carolinas and Vir- 
ginia. It is situated on the eastern border of the elevated 
Piedmont Belt, and is free from malarial influences, while a 
few miles to the east the broad level lands of the Atlantic 
coast line stretch out to the ocean. The city thus enjoys 
the double advantage of an elevation sufficient to insure a 
light, dry atmosphere, and perfect drainage, and propinquity 
to the ocean sufficiently close to temper very perceptibly 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 13 

the severity of the winter climate. The surrounding country 
is fertile and prosperous, affording an excellent market. 

GDfje Campus, 2£utttJtngs; anb General equipment 

St. Mary's is situated on the highest elevation in the city, 
about a half-mile due west of the Capitol, surrounded by its 
twenty-acre grove of original forest of oak and pine, with a 
frontage of about twelve hundred feet on one of the most 
beautiful residence streets. The site is all that can be de- 
sired for convenience, health and beauty. The campus con- 
tains almost a mile of walks and driveways, with tennis 
courts and basketball ^grounds for outdoor exercises. 

W*t iBuflfaing*? 

The buildings are fourteen in number, and are conven- 
iently grouped. All those in the regular work of the School 
are so connected by covered ways that the pupil can go to 
and from classrooms, dining hall, and Chapel without exposure 
to the weather. The buildings are heated by steam and are 
lighted with electricity throughout. Modern fire escapes, 
in addition to other precautions, minimize any danger from 
fire. 

The Main Building, the principal academic building, is 
of brick, three and a half stories high. It contains recrea- 
tion rooms and the Domestic Science Department on the 
basement floor; the parlor and the schoolroom on the first 
floor; rooms for teachers and pupils on the second floor; and 
on the third floor, two large dormitories. The halls are 
spacious, with front and rear stairways. Bathrooms and 
closets are conveniently located in this building and in all 
the buildings used for dormitory purposes. 

Adjoining the Main building on the east and west and 
connected with it are the new Wlngs, three stories high, built 
in 1 909, containing on the lower floors large classrooms and 
on the two upper floors, large comfortable rooms for pupils 



14 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

with two wardrobe closets connected with each room, bath- 
rooms and trunk elevators, and attics for the storage of 
trunks. 

The East and West Rock Houses are two-story stone 
buildings connected with the Main Building by covered cor- 
ridors of brick. The East Rock contains the Rector's office 
and the Business Offices, a sitting room for the Faculty, a 
reception room, and a suite of rooms for the Business School 
on the first floor; on the second floor, rooms for teachers and 
college students. The West Rock has a dormitory on the 
first floor, and on the second, rooms for teachers and pupils. 

The North Dormitory, completed in the fall of 1901, is a 
two-story frame building, having rooms for teachers on the 
first floor and on the second floor rooms for students. 

Clement Hall, built out of funds bequeathed by Miss 
Eleanor Clement, a former teacher, who in this way showed 
her devotion to St. Mary's, is a large modern building sit- 
uated back of the main group of buildings and connected 
with them by a covered way. It contains on the first floor a 
gymnasium 50 by 90 feet, and above this a spacious dining 
hall capable of seating comfortably three hundred people. 
Back of the dining room are the serving room, kitchen, store- 
rooms, etc. 

The Art Building is a two-story brick building of Gothic 
design. On the first floor are the Library and recitation 
rooms; and on the second floor are the Science Laboratory, 
the Music Director's room, and the Studio. The Studio, a 
spacious gallery 26 by 64 feet, lighted by four large skylights, 
with an open ceiling finished in oil, forms a most beautiful 
home for the Art School. 

The Pittman Memorial Building, a fine auditorium, 
immediately east of the Art Building, was completed in 1 907. 
This building was in large part provided through a bequest 
in the will of Mrs. Mary Eliza Pittman, of Tarboro, and is in 
memory of her daughter, Eliza Battle Pittman, formerly a 
pupil of St. Mary's. 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 15 

The Piano Rooms, twenty in number, built in 1901, are 
located along one of the covered ways, outside of any of the 
main buildings. They add greatly to the efficiency of the 
Music School, while their location keeps the sound from dis- 
turbing other work. 

The Chapel, designed by Upjohn and built in the early 
days of the School, was entirely rebuilt in 1905 through the 
efforts of the Alumnae. It is cruciform in shape and has over 
three hundred sittings. It is furnished with a fine pipe organ 
of two manuals and sixteen stops, an "in memoriam" gift of 
Mrs. Bennett Smedes. The services of the Church are held 
here on week days as well as on Sundays. 

The Infirmary, built in 1903, is the general hospital for 
ordinary cases of sickness. It is built after the most approved 
models, and is provided with the latest sanitary equipment. 
It contains two large wards, a private ward, rooms for the 
Matron, pantry, and bathroom. The Annex, a separate 
building, provides facilities for isolation in case of any pos- 
sible contagious disease. 

The Laundry Building, containing first-class equipment 
for a complete and up-to-date steam laundry for the school, 
was added to the school property in the summer of 1 906. 

The Laundry and Boiler House, with the two large boilers 
which run the steam plant and laundry; the Stables; and the 
Annex-infirmary, held for emergency use in case of conta- 
gious diseases, are all to the rear of the school buildings 
proper, while located conveniently for the purposes for which 
they are used. 

The Rectory of St. Mary's was built in 1 900 upon a beau- 
tiful site on the west side of the campus, and is occupied by 
the Rector's family. On the east side, entirely independent 
of the School but within the Grove, is located the episcopal 
residence of the Diocese of North Carolina, "Ravenscroft." 



16 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 

tEfje ILiit at M. iHarp'g 

The aim of St. Mary's is to make the daily life of the stu- 
dents that of a well-regulated Christian household. The 
effort is to direct the physical, intellectual and moral develop- 
ment of the individual, with all the care that love for young 
people and wisdom in controlling them render possible. 

The pupils are distributed, chiefly in accordance with age 
and classification, among the eight halls and three dormitories. 
North Hall and the East and West Rock Halls contain double 
rooms. In the Main Hall the rooms accommodate three 
and four pupils. 

The Wings contain twenty double rooms for students, four 
rooms for three and four single rooms. Each hall is pre- 
sided over by a teacher who acts as Hall Mother. The three 
dormitories are spacious and well ventilated. They are 
divided into single alcoves by partitions six feet high, and in 
them the students enjoy the comforts of privacy and at the 
same time are under the wholesome restraint of teachers, of 
whom there is one in each dormitory. These Dormitory 
and Hall Mothers have special opportunities for correcting 
the faults and for training the character of the pupils under 
their charge, and these opportunities have been used with 
marked results. Pupils during their first year at St. Mary's 
are ordinarily assigned to one of the dormitories. 

The school hours, half-past eight to a quarter-past three, 
are spent in recitation, in music practice, or in study in the 
Study Hall or Library, the more advanced pupils being 
allowed to study in their rooms. 

^Recreation -perioDS 

The latter part of the afternoon is free for recreation and 
exercise, and the pupils are encouraged to be as much as pos- 
sible in the open air and are also required to take some 
definite exercise daily. In addition to this exercise each pupil 
(not a Junior or Senior) is required to take definite class in- 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 17 

struction and practice in Physical Culture three times a week 
under the direction of the instructor in Physical Culture. 
A special division is provided for those who are delicate or 
require some special treatment. 

A half-hour of recreation is enjoyed by the pupils before 
the evening study period and another half-hour after the 
evening study period before going to their rooms for the 
night, when they gather in the roomy parlor, with its old 
associations and fine collection of old paintings, and enjoy 
dancing among themselves, and other social diversions. 

Wfyt Hfibrarp 

The Library, located in the Art Building, is the center of 
the literary life of the school. It contains upward of twenty- 
five hundred volumes and the leading current periodicals and 
papers. The library is essentially a work room, and is open 
throughout the day, offering every facility for use by the 
students; and their attention is called frequently to the im- 
portance of making constant and careful use of its resources. 

Cfcapel Sorbite* 

The Chapel is the soul of St. Mary's, and twice daily 
teachers and pupils gather there on a common footing. 
During the session the religious exercises are conducted very 
much as in any well-ordered congregation. As St. Mary's 
is distinctly a Church school, all boarding pupils are required 
to attend the daily services and also those on Sunday. Reg- 
ular day pupils are only required to attend the morning ser- 
vices, and only on the days when recitations are held. 

The systematic study of the Bible is a regular part of the 
school course, and in addition, on Sunday morning the board- 
ing pupils spend a half -hour in religious instruction. 

Care of J^ealtf) 

Whenever a pupil is so indisposed as to be unable to attend 
to her duties or to go to the dining hall, she is required to go 
to the Infirmary, where she is removed from the noise of the 



18 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 

student life and may receive special attention away from con- 
tact with the other pupils. The Matron of the Infirmary has 
general care of the health of the pupils and endeavors to win 
them by personal influence to such habits of life as will pre- 
vent breakdowns and help them overcome any tendencies to 
sickness. Even a slight indisposition is taken in hand at the 
beginning, and thus its development into serious sickness is 
prevented. 

The employment of a School Physician enables the School 
to keep very close supervision over the health of the girls. 
The Medical Fee covers the ordinary attendance of the physi- 
cian and such small doses as pupils need from time to time. 
This arrangement leaves the school free to call in the physician 
at any time and thus in many cases to use preventive meas- 
ures, where under other circumstances unwillingness to send 
for the doctor might cause delay and result in more serious 
illness. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 19 



The School Work 

The School Yeae is divided into two terms of eighteen 
school weeks each. Each term is again divided into two 
"quarters." This division is made to assist in grading the 
progress of the pupil. Reports are mailed at the close of 
each quarter, and when possible also in the middle of each 
quarter. 

It is required that each pupil shall be present at the be- 
ginning of the session, and that her attendance shall be regular 
and punctual to the end. Sickness or other unavoidable 
cause is the only excuse accepted for nonattendance or tar- 
diness. The amount of work to be done, and the fact that it 
must be done within the time planned, makes this rule nec- 
essary to the progress of the pupil in her course. 

It must also be remembered that absence at the beginning 
of the session retards the proper work of the class and is there- 
fore unfair to the school as a whole. 

W$t intellectual framing 

Particular attention is given to the development of those 
intellectual habits that produce the maximum of efficiency. 
The student is expected to work independently, and grad- 
ually to strengthen the habit of ready, concentrated and 
sustained attention in all her thinking processes. Clearness, 
facility and ease in the expression of thought, oral and writ- 
ten, are carefully cultivated. Every effort is made to de- 
velop the best mental habits through every detail of admin- 
istration which bears upon the intellectual life, whether it be 
recitation, the study hour, the individual help, or some other 
feature of the school management. 

Eectureg anb Recitals 

An important element in the intellectual life of St. Mary's 
is the course of lectures given by distinguished professors 



20 St. Maet's School Bulletin. 

and lecturers from North Carolina and elsewhere. These 
lectures have been of much value to the students, and are 
intended to be a feature of the school life. In addition to 
these, there are given at stated times recitals by musicians 
from abroad, by the Musical Faculty, and by the students of 
the Music Department. 

H>tu&ent d£rgam?attons! 

While the regular duties at St. Mary's leave few idle mo- 
ments for the pupils, they find time for membership in various 
organizations, conducted by them under more or less direct 
supervision from the School, from which they derive much 
pleasure and profit. These organizations are intended to 
supplement the regular duties and to lend help in the develop- 
ment of different sides of the student life. All qualified stu- 
dents are advised, as far as possible, to take an active part in 
them. 

tEfje WBoman's auxiliary 

The missionary interests of the school as a whole are sup- 
plemented by the work of the branches of the Auxiliary. 
The Senior branch is made up of members of the Faculty; 
the pupils make up seven Chapters of the Junior Auxiliary, 
each Chapter being directed by a teacher chosen by its mem- 
bers. These Chapters are known respectively as St. Anne's, 
St. Catharine's, St. Elizabeth's, St. Margaret's, St. Monica's, 
St. Agnes' and Lucy Bratton. 

The work of the individual Chapters varies somewhat from 
year to year, but they jointly maintain regularly "The Aldert 
Smedes Scholarship" in the China Mission and "The Bennett 
Smedes Scholarship" in the Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte, 
and other beneficent work. 

3Tfje altar #uilSj 

The Altar Guild has charge of the altar and the decora- 
tion of the Chapel. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 21 

Witt Utterarp Societies! 

The work of the two Literary Societies — the Sigma Lambda 
and the Epsilon Alpha Pi — which meet on Wednesday eve- 
nings, does much to stimulate the intellectual life. The 
societies take their names from the Greek letters forming the 
initials of the two great Southern poets — Sydney Lanier and 
Edgar Allan Poe. The annual debate between them is a 
feature of the school life. Both boarders and day pupils are 
eligible to membership in these societies. 

Cfje jffltrte Club 

The students publish monthly a school magazine, The 
St. Mary's Muse, with the news of the school and its alumna. 
The Senior Class issues annually a year book, The Muse, 
with the photographs, illustrations, etc., that make it a val- 
ued souvenir. 

For encouraging contributions to these publications, and 
supplementing the regular class work and the work of the 
literary societies, the Muse Club is organized and holds 
its meetings weekly. 

©ije §vkttti) Club 

The Sketch Club is under the supervision of the Art De- 
partment. Frequent excursions are made during the pleas- 
ant fall and spring weather for the purpose of sketching from 

nature, etc. 

QTije JDramatic Club 

The Dramatic Club is under the supervision of the Elocu- 
tion Department. Opportunity is afforded for simple general 
training that is frequently valuable in teaching poise, enun- 
ciation, and expression, while care is taken not to allow any 
exaggeration. 

The Club presents annually some simple drama. 

ifflugical ©rganijationsf 

The Glee Club is under the supervision of the Music De- 
partment. It affords much pleasure to its members, and 
gives occasional informal recitals. 



22 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

In addition to this purely voluntary club, the Choir, the 
Orchestra, the String Club, and the Chorus afford pupils both 
in and out of the Music Department opportunity to develop 
their musical talent. 

atfjlettc Clubs 

In addition to the regular instruction given by a competent 
teacher, the pupils, with advisers from the Faculty, have a 
voluntary athletic association, the object of which is to foster 
interest in out of door sports. The association is divided 
into two clubs for purposes of competition. The Association 
has tennis, basketball, and walking clubs, which are generally 
very active in the season proper for these recreations. 



St. Mark's School Bulletin. 23 

Work of the Departments 

gcatiemtc department 

I. The Primary School; II. The Preparatory School; 
III. The College. 

The Academic Department affords opportunity for a con- 
tinuous training carried on without interruption from the time 
the pupil enters school until she leaves the college. 

This department consists of the Primary School, the Prepar- 
atory School, and the College. 

The Primary School and the first two years of the Prepara- 
tory School are maintained entirely on account of the local 
demand. They are not intended for boarding pupils (who 
must be ready to enter the third year of the Preparatory 
School, the first High School year). 

I. THE PRIMARY SCHOOL. 

The Primary School covers the work of four grades. It has 
been the aim of those in charge, since the opening of the de- 
partment in 1879, to give its pupils every advantage. To 
vary the monotony of the three R's, lessons in free-hand 
drawing, physical culture and singing are given. Kindergar- 
ten methods in teaching form and color have been used; in 
short, every effort is made to make the instruction interesting 
as well as thorough. 

II. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

The Preparatory School covers a four year course corre- 
sponding to the last two years of a Grammar School and the 
first two years of a High School (7th to 1 Oth grades inclusive) 
of the highest standard. 



24 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Upper preparatory 

The last two years of the Preparatory School and first two 
years of the College cover the work of the best High Schools 
and the courses are numbered for convenience A, B, C and 
D. See pages 35-36. 

The course in the Upper Preparatory is closely prescribed 
and each pupil is expected to adhere to it. It is intended to 
prepare for the College and is also designed to serve as a 
school for those who, while unable to take a college course, 
intend to enter the Business Department and prepare them- 
selves for employment in the many avenues of commercial 
life now open to women. 

Admission to the Upper Preparatory classes may be al- 
lowed provisionally on certificate without examination; but 
all candidates are advised to bring or send certificates and also 
take such examinations as are necessary. School standards 
differ so materially that much time is lost in the effort to 
classify candidates satisfactorily on certificates alone, since 
this results, in many cases, in failure to succeed in the class 
that is attempted at first. 

At entrance every pupil is required to select some definite 
course and afterwards to keep to it. This requirement is de- 
signed to keep pupils from that vacillating course which puts 
an end to serious work, and can never really accomplish any- 
thing. It is not intended to hinder those who, coming to 
take a special course in Music, Art or Business, desire to 
occupy profitably their spare time in some one or more of the 
courses of the College. 

III. THE COLLEGE 

The first two years of the present college course are intended 
to complete the work of a first-class high school, and the pupil 
is limited in well-defined lines and not allowed to specialize 
or take elective work except within narrow limits ; in the last 
two years the courses are conducted on college lines, and the 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 25 

pupil, under advice, is permitted in large measure to elect the 
lines of work best suited to her taste and ability. 

The present policy is to make the last two years at St. 
Mary's equal in curriculum and in the quality of the work to 
the first two years of the best colleges for women, so that those 
who may choose to prolong their college work may be fitted 
to enter the Junior Class in such institutions. 

Care must be exercised in this selection to choose courses 
that will secure the necessary aggregate of sixty points and 
that cover the requirements specified on page 30. 

Those who may possibly enter some higher institution after 
graduation at St. Mary's should note carefully that the 
courses in the College should be chosen with reference to 
the requirements of the higher classes of the institution to 
which they are expected to go; and that the choice should be 
made as early as possible. A properly arranged course at 
St. Mary's will admit to the Junior Class of the highest 
northern colleges. But the course that might lead to the 
award of a diploma at St. Mary's might not cover the sub- 
jects necessary for entrance to the advanced class of any 
given college of higher grade. 

gfomteslon to tfje Jfresfjman Class; 

It is preferred that all applicants should bring Certificates 
showing the work done at their last school along with a Cer- 
tificate of Honorable Dismissal and that they should also be 
examined. This prevents mistakes and disappointment later 
on and insures better classification. Certificates alone will, 
however, be accepted provisionally for entrance to the Fresh- 
man Class without examination from all institutions known 
to us to be of the proper standard. Such certificates must 
state specifically that all work required for entrance has been 
well done, naming text-books, number of pages, and the grade 
or mark received, together with the length of each recitation 
and the time spent upon each branch. 

4 



26 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Parents and teachers will please remember that, in 
order to be of any service whatever, a certificate must 
cover the foregoing points. A statement that a pupil is well- 
behaved and industrious and has received a grade of 90 
in "English'' is of no use whatever in enabling the School 
to decide what work has been accomplished. 

Parents are also urged, wherever possible, to obtain cer- 
tificates of work done, before the close of the school year. 
Teachers are not to blame for inaccuracy in certificates made 
out from memory when absent on their summer vacations. 
Such certificates are, however, of little value. 

W&i Hegutrements for ^omt&sion to the Jf restyman 
Class of &l jUarp'S ^cfjool 

In order to be admitted to the Freshman Class of the Col- 
lege the pupil must meet the requirements outlined below 
in English, History, Mathematics, Science and one foreign 
language — five subjects in all. If two foreign languages are 
offered Science may be omitted. 

A pupil admitted in four of the five required subjects will 
be admitted as a Conditioned Freshman. 

English and Literature. — A good working knowledge of 
the principles of English Grammar as set forth in such works 
as Buehler's Modern Grammar, with special attention to the 
analysis and construction of the English sentence. 

Knowledge of elementary Rhetoric and Composition as set 
forth in such works as Maxwell's Writing in English, or 
Hitchcock's Exercises in English Composition. 

Candidates are expected to have had at least two years' 
training in general composition (themes, letter writing, and 
dictation). 

Subjects for composition may be drawn from the following 
works, which the pupil is expected to have studied: Long- 
fellow's Evangeline and Courtship of Miles Standish (or 
Tales of a Wayside Inn); selections from Irving's Sketch 
Book (or Irving's Tales of a Traveler); Hawthorne's Twice 
Told Tales; Scott's Ivanhoe and George Eliot's Silas Marner. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 27 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic complete, with special atten- 
tion to the principles of percentage and interest. Elemen- 
tary Algebra complete and Advanced Algebra through Quad- 
ratic Equations. 

History. — The History of the United States complete as 
laid down in a good high school text; the essential facts of 
English History; the essential facts of Greek and Roman 
History. 

Latest. — A sound knowledge of the forms of the Latin noun, 
pronoun and verb, and a knowledge of the elementary rules 
of syntax and composition as laid down in a standard first- 
year book and beginner's composition (such as Bennett's 
First Year Latin and Bennett's Latin Composition). The 
first three books of Caesar's Gallic War. 

French or German.— A first-year course leading to the 
knowledge of the elements of the grammar and the ability to 
read simple prose. 

Science. — The essential facts of Physical Geography and 
Physiology as laid down in such texts as Tarr's Physical 
Geography and Martin's Human Body. 

gtomt&Sion to gbrjanceo Clashes 

In order to be admitted to work higher than that of the 
Freshman Class, students must first be admitted to the 
Freshman Class in the manner detailed above, and must also, 
as a rule, be examined in the work of the College class or 
classes which they wish to anticipate. That is, a candidate 
for the Junior Class, for example, must be examined in the 
studies of the Freshman and Sophomore years. If this is 
done unconditional credit by points, counting toward the 60 
points needed for graduation, is at once given. 

No exception is made to the above requirement of exam- 
ination in Mathematics CI (Advanced Algebra) or in En- 
glish D (Advanced Rhetoric and Composition) and in one or 
two other subjects where the higher courses in these subjects 
do not sufficiently test the pupil's previous knowledge. 



28 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Though it is again urged that pupils always be examined 
for any such advanced classes and thus obtain unconditional 
credit at once, the certificates from schools well known to be 
of entirely equivalent standard will be accepted conditionally 
in other subjects, provided the student continues the same 
studies in the higher classes after entering St. Mary's and thus 
obtains as many points for work in each study done at St. 
Mary's as the number of points for which she desires certifi 
cate credit. This conditional credt on certificate will be- 
given her unconditionally only after she has obtained credit 
by successful work in the advanced classes. For example, a 
pupil entering M English will be entitled to eight points of 
certificate credit in English conditionally (that is, for the C 
English and D English work). When she has completed 
the work of M English she receives four points for this work 
done at St. Mary's and is at the same time given uncondi- 
tionally four points of the eight points already credited con- 
ditionally on certificate. When she completes the work of 
N English she in like manner receives four points for that 
work and the other four points already credited conditionally 
on certificate are then credited unconditionally, thus making 
1 6 points in English for the two years' work — eight points for 
work done at the school and eight points for the previous 
work credited to her and which was accepted conditionally. 

Blanks for these certificates will be sent upon application. 
A candidate for admission may be accepted in some subjects 
or in parts of subjects and not in all. 

Certificates 

Certificates when accepted are credited conditionally at 
their face value. The pupil is placed in the class which her 
certificate gives her the right to enter. If she does satis- 
factory work during the first month, she is given regular 
standing in the class; if at the end of the first month her work 
has proved unsatisfactory, she is either required to enter the 
next lower class or may be given a trial for one month more. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 29 

examinations! 

All candidates for admission who can not show the proper 
certificates for preparatory work, will be examined to deter- 
mine their proper classification. 

Specimen examination questions in any subject will be 
furnished on request; and principals who are preparing 
pupils for St. Mary's will be furnished the regular examina- 
tion papers at the regular times, in January and May, if 
desired. 

Certificates are urgently desired in all cases, whether the 
candidate is to be examined or not. 

Regular Course 

All pupils are advised to take a regular prescribed course 
and to keep to it; a changing about from one subject to an- 
other, with no definite aim in view, is unsatisfactory alike to 
pupil, parent and the School. Parents are urged to advise 
with the Rector as to a course for their daughters and help in 
this matter is given by him or his representatives to the pupil 
throughout her course. 

Special Courses; 

Those who desire to take academic work while specializing 
in the Departments of Music, Art, Expression or Business, 
are permitted to do so and are assigned to such classes in the 
Academic Department as suit their purpose and preparation. 
The number of hours of academic work along with the time 
spent on the specialties should be sufficient to keep the pupil 
well occupied. 

Classification 

In order to graduate and receive the School diploma a 
pupil must receive credit for 60 points in certain specific 
subjects. Even though a student does not expect to grad- 
uate she is classified as Freshman, Sophomore, etc., accord- 
ing to the amount of work done in the College course. The 
classification is arranged as follows: 



30 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 

A student admitted to the Freshman Class with condition 
in not more than one subject is ranked as a Conditioned 
Freshman. 

If admitted without condition she is ranked as a Freshman. 

A student with 15 points of unconditional credit is ranked 
as a Sophomore. 

A student with 30 points of unconditional credit is ranked 
as a Junior. 

A student with 42 points of unconditional credit is ranked 
as a Senior, provided that she takes that year with the ap- 
proval of the School sufficient points counting toward her 
graduation to make the 60 points necessary. 

A pupil entitled to be ranked in any way with a given class 
under the above conditions must also take work sufficient to 
give her the prospect of obtaining enough points during the 
year to entitle her to enter the next higher class the following 
year. 

<Hrabuatton 

The course leading to graduation from the College is out- 
lined later in stating the work of each year. The course is 
closely prescribed during the first two years (through the 
Sophomore year). In the last two years the pupil is allowed 
a broad choice of electives. 

The requirements for graduation may be briefly summed 
up as follows: 

(1) The candidate must have been a pupil in the depart- 
ment during at least one entire school year. 

(2) The candidate must have obtained credit for all the 
required courses of the four years of the College and sufficient 
additional credit to make at least 60 points. 

(3) The candidate must have earned at least the amount 
of credit specified below, in the subjects indicated: 

English: 12 points. 

Mathematics: 5 points. 

History: 6 points. 

Science: 4 points. 

Philosophy : 6 points. 

Foreign Languages (Latin, French, or German in any 

combination) : 15 points. 
Total: 48 points. 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 31 

(4) Not more than 20 points will be counted for class work 
in any one year; not more than 15 'points will be counted alto- 
gether in any one subject (Latin, French and German being 
considered as separate subjects); and not more than 12 points 
will be counted for technical work done in the Departments 
of Music, Art and Elocution. 

(5) The candidate must have made up satisfactorily any 
and all work, in which she may have been "conditioned" at 
least one-half year before the date at which she wishes to graduate. 

(6) The candidate must have made formal written announce- 
ment of her candidacy for graduation during the first quarter 
of the year in which the diploma is to be awarded; and her 
candidacy must have been then passed upon favorably by the 
Rector. 

(7) The candidate must have satisfactorily completed all 
"general courses" which may have been prescribed; must have 
maintained a satisfactory deportment; and must have borne 
herself in such a way as a pupil as would warrant the authorities 
in giving her the mark of the school's approval. 

gtoarbs; 

The St. Mary's Diploma is awarded a pupil who has suc- 
cessfully completed the full academic course required for 
graduation as indicated above. 

An Academic Certificate will be awarded to pupils who 
receive a Certificate or Diploma in Music or Art, on the con- 
ditions laid down for graduation from the College, except 
that 

(1) The minimum number of points of academic credit re- 
quired will be 35 points, instead of 60 points. 

(2) These points will be counted for any strictly academic 
work in the College. 

(3) No technical or theoretical work in Music or Art will 
be credited toward these 35 points. 

atuar&js in ©tfjer Ueparrmente 

For academic requirements for certificates or diplomas in 
Music or Art, see under those departments. 



32 St. Maby's School Bulletin". 

Commencement honors 

Honors at graduation are based on the work of the last 
two years, the true college years. 

The Valedictorian has the first honor; the Saltjta- 
torian has the second honor. The Essayist is chosen on 
the basis of the final essays submitted. 

anfje ^onor 3&oO 

The highest general award of merit, open to all members 
of the School, is the Honor Roll, announced at Commence- 
ment. The requirements are: 

(1) The pupil must have been in attendance the entire ses- 
sion and have been absent from no duty at any time during 
the session without the full consent of the Rector, and without 
lawful excuse. 

(2) She must have had during the year a full regular course 
of study or its equivalent, and must have carried this work to 
successful completion, taking all required examinations. 

(3) She must have maintained an average of "Very Good," 
(90 per cent) or better, in her studies. 

(4) She must have made a record of "Excellent" (less than 
two demerits) in Deportment, in Industry, and in Punctuality. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory bearing 
in the affairs of her school life during the year. 

Wi)t JJtles Miiial 

The Niles Medal for General Excellence was insti- 
tuted by Rev. Charles Martin Niles, D.D., in 1906. It is 
awarded to the pupil who has made the best record in 
scholarship and deportment during the session. 

The medal is awarded to the same pupil only once. 

The requirements for eligibility are: 

(1) The pupil must have taken throughout the year at least 
"15 points" of regular work; and have satisfactorily completed 
this work, passing all required examinations. 

(2) The pupil must have been "Excellent" in Deportment. 

(3) The pupil must have taken all regular general courses 
assigned and have done satisfactory work in them. 

(4) The pupil must be a regular student of the College Depart- 
ment. 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 33 

ZEfje Jyisfjop barker JBotanp $ri?e 

The Bishop Parker Botany Prize, given by the Rt. 
Rev. Edward M. Parker, Bishop Coadjutor of New Hamp- 
shire, is awarded annually to that pupil who in accordance 
with certain published conditions does the best work in the 
preparation of an herbarium. 

Gtfje iflusfe $ri?eg 

The Muse Prizes — copies of the annual Muse — are pres- 
ented by the Managers of the Muse to the students who by 
their written or artistic contributions have done the most to 
help the annual and monthly Muse during the current year. 

General Statements! 

®fje Minimum of Slcaaemic Width j&ecjuireo for Certificates! 

Candidates for Certificates in any subject in the College, 
the Music Department, the Art Department, or the Elocu- 
tion Department, must have completed the following mini- 
mum of academic work. This work must have been done at 
St. Mary's, or be credited by certificate or examination in 
accordance with the regular rules for credits. 

(1) The A and B Courses in English, History, Mathematics, 
Science, and in either Latin or French or German. 

(2) The C and D Courses in English and in History. 

(3) Such other C and D Courses as will amount to "eight 
points" of Academic credit. 

For example: 

Mathematics C and D ; 
or Latin C and D ; 

or French C and D and German C and D ; 
or Mathematics C and Science C and D; 
or Latin C and French C and D, etc. 

Wbt Amount of Certificate Crebit 

Certificates from other schools are accepted provisionally 
at their face value. No permanent credit is given until the 
pupil has proved the quality of past work by present work. 
5 



34 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Credit is allowed for no subject unless the pupil takes a 
higher course in that subject at St. Mary's; and the amount 
of credit allowed by certificate in any subject can not exceed 
the amount of credit earned afterward by the pupil in that 
subject at St. Mary's. 

Credit will not be allowed by certificate (but only by ex- 
amination) for English D or Mathematics C, 1 (Algebra). 

A pupil if she is admitted on certificate to a D course, receives 
no credit toward graduation for the C Course until after she 
has done a half-year's work successfully. The D Courses in 
English, French, German and Mathematics have as a prerequisite 
the completion of the C Course. Pupils admitted unconditioned 
to these D Courses will therefore be given graduation credit for 
the C Courses when they have finished the D Course (except for 
Math. C, 1.) 

Pupils will be admitted to M and N Courses only by exami- 
nation or after having finished the lower courses required. 

Certificates will not be accepted for admission to the work 
of M and N Courses. 

Scatremtc Crebtt for OTorfe in ©tfjer JBepartmenfci 

The theoretical work in Music is credited as follows: 

Harmony I and II: 1 point each. 
Music History I and II: 1 point each. 

To obtain this credit the pupil must attain the passing 
mark (75 per cent) on recitations and examinations. 

The completion at St. Mary's of the technical work in the 
Freshman, Sophomore, Junior or Senior classes in Music 
entitles the pupil to 3 points of academic credit for the work 
of each class, and a like credit is offered in the Departments 
of Art and Elocution. 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 35 



The Regular Academic Course 

The letter given with each course is the name of the course 
(as English A, French C). The number following the letter 
gives in the Preparatory Department the number of periods 
of recitation weekly. 

In the College work a number after the Easter term only indicates 
the number of points for both terms' work, and that no credit is 
given for less than the work of the whole year; while a number 
after each term indicates the number of points for such term 
and that the course for that term is a separate one for which 
credit is given separately. Ordinarily the number of points 
for a year's course is the same as the number of hours of weekly 
recitation; for a term's course one-half the number of hours of 
weekly recitation. 

®pper preparatory fKSorfe 

All the subjects are required in the regular course. 

THIRD TEAR. 

Advent Term. Easter Term. 

English: Grammar, A, 5. English: Grammar, A, 5. 

History: English, A, 5. History: American, A, 5. 

Mathematics: Algebra, A, 5. Mathematics: Arithmetic, A, 5. 

Latin: First Book, A, 5. Latin: First Book, A, 5. 

Science: General, A, 3. Science: Geography, A, 3. 

All pupils are also required to take Bible Study, Drawing, Reading, and 
Physical Culture. 

French A may also be taken. 

FOURTH TEAR. 

Advent Term. Easter Term. 

English: Elem. Rhetoric, B, 5. English: Elem. Rhetoric, B, 5. 

History: Greek, B, 4. History: Roman, B, 4. 

Mathematics: Algebra, B, 5. Mathematics: Algebra, B, 5. 

Latin: Csesar, B, 4. Latin: Caesar, B, 4. 

Science: Physical Geography, Science: Physiology, B, 3. 
B, 3. 

All pupils are also required to take Bible Study, Drawing, Reading and 
Physical Culture. 

French B or German B may also be taken. 



36 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

®i)t College Woxk 

It should be remembered that 60 points of credit are required 
for graduation from the College, and that 48 -points of this 60 
points are in required subjects as follows: (See also page 30.) 

English: 12 points (that is Courses C and D; and either M or N). 
History: 6 points (that is three of the four Courses, C, D, M, N) . 
Mathematics : 5 points (that is Course C) . 
Science: 4 points (that is Courses C and D). 
Philosophy: 6 points (that is Courses M and N). 
Foreign Languages: 15 points (in any combination), for example, 
Latin C, D, M, N, and French or German C; 

or Latin C, D, and French or German C, D, M ; 

or French C, D, M, N, and German C, D, M or vice versa; 

or Latin C, D, and French C, D, and German C, D. 
Total: 48 points required. 

The other 12 points are entirely elective. Music or Art may 
count 3 points each year or 12 points in all, or the 12 points may 
be elected from any C, D, M, or N Course in the College. 

A member of any College class must take the required courses of 
that class and enough elective courses to make altogether fifteen points 
of credit for the year. 

The courses starred, *, are necessary for graduation; and of the courses 
starred and bracketed (*) in English, M or N is required, and in History three 
of the four courses must be taken. 

jfresfcman |9ear 
Advent Term. Easter Term. 

*English: Rhetoric, C. *English: Literature, C, 4. „ 

*Mathematics: Algebra, C, 3. *Mathematics: Geometry, C, 2 . 

(*) History: English, C, 2. — *Science: Botany, C, 2. ^ 
Latin: Cicero, C. Latin: Cicero, C, 4. «. 

French: Grammar, C. French: Readings, C, 2. — 

German: Grammar, C. German: Readings, C, 2. 

At least one foreign language is required. 

An hour of Bible Study and a period each of Spelling and 
Reading weekly is required. 

The regular course in Music or Art may be taken as an addi- 
tional subject for credit (3 points). 

Not less than 16 points nor more than 20 points should be 
taken. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 37 

g>opf)omore |?ear 

Advent Term. Easter Term. 

*English: Studies, D, 2. *English: American Lit., D, 4. 

*Science: Chemistry, D, 2. (*)History: American, D, 2. 

Mathematics: Geom., D, 1%. Mathematics: Trig., D, 1J^. 

Latin: Virgil, D. Latin, Virgil, D, 4. 

French: Modern, D. French: Modern, D, 2. 

German: Modern, D. German: Modern, D, 2. 

The foreign language elected in the Freshman Year should be 
continued and enough foreign language must be elected to count 
at least 4 points. 

An hour each of Bible Study and Current History and a period 
of Spelling weekly is required. 

The regular course in Music or Art may be taken as a subject 
for credit (3 points). 

Sfuttior gear 

Advent Term. Easter Term. 

(*)English: Poetics, M, 2. (*)English: Essayists, M, 2. 

(*)History: Middle Ages, M. (*)History: Middle Ages, M, 2. 

*Philosophy: Civics, M, 1. *Philosophy: Economics, M, 1. 

Mathematics: Analytics, M. Mathematics: Analytics, M, 3. 

Latin: Historians, M. Latin: Poets, M, 3. 

French: Modern, M. French: Modern, M, 3. 

German: Modern, M. German: Modern, M, 3. 

Enough work in foreign language must be elected to count 
at least 4 points. 

An hour each of Bible Study and Current History is required. 

The regular course in Music or Art may be taken as a subject 
for credit (3 points). 

Senior gear 

Advent Term. Easter Term. 

(*)English: Hist. Lang, N, 2. (*)English: Shakespeare, N. 2. 

(*)History: Modern, N. (*)History: Modern, N, 2. 

*Philosophy: Ethics, N, 1. *Philosophy: Evidences, N, 1. 

*Philosophy: Psychology, N. *Philosophy, Psychology, N, 2. 

Latin: Philosophy, N. Latin: Drama, N, 3. 

French: Classics, N. French: Classics, N, 3. 

German: Classics, N. German: Classics, N, 3. 

Mathematics: Calculus, N. Mathematics: Calculus, N, 3. 

Enough foreign language must be taken to complete at least 
the 15 points required for graduation. 



38 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

An hour each of Bible Study and Current History is required. 

English N is required unless 12 points have already been 
earned in English. 

History N is required unless 6 points have already been 
earned in History. 

The regular course in Music or Art may be taken as a subject 
for credit (3 points). 

Note: — The Theoretical courses in Music and Art may be 
counted as elective in any college class, and the technical work 
of the proper grade in either Music, Art, or Elocution may be 
counted in any college class as an elective for three points. 
But only one subject may be so counted. 

Failure in the Bible course for any year will deprive the pupil 
of one of the points gained in other subjects. 

General Courses 

The theory of St. Mary's being that a well-rounded edu- 
cation results in a developing of the best type of Christian 
womanhood, certain general courses as outlined below have 
been prescribed for all pupils. 

a&eabtng 

Believing that at the present day too little attention is 
paid to the art of clear, forceful, intelligent reading, St. 
Mary's requires all her pupils, except Juniors and Seniors, 
to take practical training to this end. 

Spelling anb Composition 

An hour each week is devoted to training the same pupils 
in overcoming defects in spelling, and in letter writing. 

Current ©istorp 

Pupils of the Senior, Junior and Sophomore years meet 
once a week for the discussion of current topics, current lit- 
erature, etc. This exercise is intended to lead to a discrim- 
inating reading of current publications and to improve the 
powers of conversation. 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 39 

formal 3fas(truetion 

Pupils who announce their intention at the beginning of the 
Senior year to devote themselves to teaching after their grad- 
uation, will be given special assistance to this end, both in 
instruction and in practice. 

I5tble g>tubp 

All pupils are required to take the prescribed course in 
Bible Study, which is given one hour a week. It is intended 
to afford a knowledge of the English Bible, of the history and 
literature of the Biblical books, and of their contents, and 
is not dogmatic in its teachings. 

ip&pstcal Culture 

All pupils not excused on the ground of health are required 
to take the required exercises in physical culture, which are 
thoroughly practical and are intended to train the pupils in the 
art of managing their bodies, in standing, walking, using 
their limbs, breathing, and the like. The exercise is most 
wholesome and the training imparts to the pupils sugges- 
tions about their health which will be most useful to them 
throughout life. 



40 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 



The Courses in Detail 

General Statements; 

The courses are here lettered systematically. It is impor- 
tant to note and consider the letter of the course in deter- 
mining credits or planning a pupil's work. 

"O" Courses are preliminary. Where a pupil has not had 
sufficient previous preparation for the regular courses, she will 
be required to take this "O" work before going on into "A." 

"A" Courses are the lowest regular courses, and are taken 
in the Third Year of the Preparatory school. 

"B" Courses are taken in the Fourth Year (last year) of the 
Preparatory School. 

The "A" and "B" Courses in English, History, Mathematics, 
and Science and one foreign language (or their equivalents), must 
have been finished satisfactorily by a pupil before she is eligible for 
admission to the College. 

"C" and "D" Courses are taken ordinarily in the Freshman 
and Sophomore years. In English, Mathematics, Latin, French, 
and German, the "C" Course must be taken before the pupil 
can enter the "D" Course. 

"M" and "N" Courses are ordinarily taken in the Junior or 
Senior years. Pupils are not eligible to take these courses 
until they have finished the "C" and "D" Courses of the same 
subjects. (See special exceptions before each subject.) 

"X" Courses are special courses not counting toward gradu- 
ation. 

Mr. Stone. 

Courses O, A and B are Preparatory, and the knowledge ob- 
tained in them is required before a pupil can enter the College. 
Courses C, D, M, and N are College courses. 

Candidates for graduation must take at least 6 points in 
History. 

Candidates for certificates must take at least Courses C and D. 

Course 0. — 5 half-hours a week. American History. A 
grammar school course in United States History, impressing 
the leading facts and great names. 



St. Makt's School Bulletin. 41 

Course A. — 5 half -hours a week. (1) English History. 
(2) American History. A constant aim of this course will 
be to impress the pupil so thoroughly with the leading facts 
of English and American history that she will have a solid 
framework to be built upon later in her more advanced studies 
in History, English, and Literature. 

Coman & Kendall, Short History of England; Thompson, 
History of the United States. 

Course B. — 4 hours a week. Ancient History. (1) First 
half-year: Greece; (2) Second half-year: Rome. The course 
in Ancient History makes a thorough study of the ancient 
world. The pupil is sufficiently drilled in map work to have 
a working knowledge of the ancient world; the influence of 
some of the great men is emphasized by papers based on out- 
side reading, for instance: Plutarch's Lives. Selections from 
Homer are read in class. 

West, Ancient World; Ivanhoe Historical Note-Book, Part III. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week, first half-year. (2 points.) 
English History. In this course emphasis is laid on the 
development of constitutional government particularly with 
its bearing on United States History. The Ivanhoe Note 
Books are used for map work. From time to time papers are 
required on important events and great men. 

Higginson & Channing, English History for Americans. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week, second half-year. (2 points.) 
American History. In U. S. History the text-book gives a 
clear and fair treatment of the causes leading to our war with 
Great Britain; to the War Between the States; and of present 
day questions, political, social and economic. 

Adams and Trent, History of United States. 

Course M. — 2 hours a week. (2 points.) Medieval His- 
tory. In Medieval and Modern History the pupil is given a 
clear view of the development of feudalism; of monarchic 
6 



42 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

states; of the history of the Christian Church; of the Refor- 
mation; of the growth of democracy, and of the great political, 
social and religious questions of the present day, with some 
special reference work in the library. 

West, Modern History; Ivanhoe Note-Book, Part IV. 

Course N. — 2 hours a week (2 points). Modern History. 
A continuation of Course M. Same methods. 

Robertson and Beard, The Development of Modern Europe, 
Vol. II. 

W$t Cngltstf) language anfc literature 

Miss Thomas. Miss Wilson. 

All pupils at entrance will be required to stand a written 
test to determine general knowledge of written English. 

Courses 0, A, and B are Preparatory and the knowledge 
obtained in them is required before a pupil can enter a higher 
course. 

Candidates for graduation must take Courses C and D and 
at least 4 points from Courses M and N. 

Candidates for certificates must take Courses C and D. 

Course 0. — (Preliminary.) 5 half -hours a week. (1) 
Grammar. Text-book: Emerson & Bender, Modern English, 
(Book Two); Lessons in English Grammar. (2) Reading of 
myths (Guerber's stories), legends, other stories and poems; 
memorizing of short poems. 

Course A. — 5 hours a week. (1) Grammar and Composi- 
tion. Text -book: Buehler, Modern Grammar. (2) Liter- 
ature: Longfellow's Evangeline or Courtship of Miles Standish; 
Irving's Sketch Boo\; Hawthorne's short stories; Bryant's 
poems; Whittier's Snow Bound; Selections from Burroughs 
and Warner; Stevenson's Treasure Island; memorizing of 
poems. 

Course B. — 5 hours a week. (1) Grammar. Review of 
English grammar; analysis and parsing of more difficult 
constructions, with special study of verb-phrases and verbals. 
(2) Composition: Study of principles of composition; narra- 
tive, descriptive, expository themes; reproductions; letter 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 43 

writing; use of models. (3) Literature: Scott's Ivanhoe and 
Lady of the Lake; George Eliot's Silas Marner; short poems 
of Tennyson; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; brief lyrical 
and narrative poems. 

Hitchcock, Exercises in English Composition. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) (1) Rhetoric 
and Composition: Frequent oral and written exercises lead- 
ing to correctness in use of words, structure of sentences, 
and ability to put into practice general principles of compo- 
sition. (2) English Literature: Study of a history of English 
literature; careful study of a few classics; reading of narra- 
tive and descriptive works in prose and poetry with class 
discussion and oral and written reports on reading done. 

(1) Baldwin, Writing and Speaking; (2) Tappan, England's 
Literature; Palgrave's Golden Treasury; Julius Cwsar (possible 
substitution of another play of Shakespeare); selected poems of 
Goldsmith, Gray, Coleridge, Byron; one or two novels; Roger de 
Coverley Papers. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Prerequisite; 
Course C. (1) Rhetoric and Composition: Especial atten- 
tion to paragraph and to elements of style, clearness, force, 
life, smoothness, themes of various types weekly or twice a 
week; brief study of argumentation. (2) Literature: Study 
of various literary types; in second half-year, outline history 
of American Literature with parallel reading. 

(1) Espenshade's Essentials of Composition and Rhetoric; (2) 
Macaulay's Essay on Johnson, or Carlyle's Essay on Burns; 
Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Comus; Burke's Speech on Con- 
ciliation, Dickens' Tale of Two Cities; Newcomer's or Bates' 
American Literature. 

Course Ml. — 4 hours a week, first half-year. (2 points.) 
Prerequisite: Course D. Poetry of nineteenth century; spe- 
cial study of Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson. 

Themes, imaginative and critical. 

Saintsbury's History of Nineteenth Century Literature; selected 
poems; Globe edition of Tennyson's poems. 



44 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Course M2. — 4 hours a week, second half-year. (2 points.) 
Prerequisite: Course D. Prose writers of the nineteenth 
century; special study of Lamb, Carlyle, Ruskin. 

Themes, expository and argumentative. 

Saintsbury's History of Nineteenth Century Literature; one or 
two novels; selected essays of the writers named. 

Course N1. — 4 hours a week, first half-year. (2 points.) 
Prerequisite: Course D. History of the English Language, 
with illustrative reading. Essay writing. 

Lounsbury, History of the English Language; Chaucer, Pro- 
logue and Knight's Tale. 

Course N2. — 4 hours a week, second half-year. (2 points.) 
Prerequisite: Course D. The English Drama, Shakespeare. 
Rise of the drama studied by means of lectures and outside 
reading; careful study of two or three of Shakespeare's plays, 
with reading of others; essay writing. 

The Axden Edition of Shakespeare's works; Dowden's Shake- 
speare Primer. 

Jf oretgn Languages 

Candidates for graduation must take at least 15 points in 
foreign languages. 

Jfrencfj 
Miss Skinner Miss Urquhart. 

Course A. — (Preliminary.) 5 half-hours a week. A 
course for young children. The study of the language begun 
without a text-book. Careful drill in pronunciation. The 
learning of the names of objects and the forming of sentences. 
Reading in Guerber, Contes et Legendes I. 

Course B. — (Preliminary.) 5 half-hours a week. The 
study of the language begun. Careful drill in pronunciation. 
Reading, grammar, dictation, conversation. 

Guerber, Contes et Legendes I; Brooks, Chardenal, Complete 
French Course; Super, French Reader. 



St. Maey's School Bulletin. 45 

Course C. — 5 half -hours a week. (2 points.) Prerequisite: 
French B. Elementary French I. Systematic study of the 
language. Grammar, reading, conversation. Careful drill 
in pronunciation; the rudiments of grammar (inflection, use 
of personal pronouns, common adverbs, prepositions, and 
conjunctions; order of words; elementary rules of syntax); 
the reading of from 1 00 to 1 75 duodecimo pages of graduated 
texts, with constant practice in translating into French easy 
variations of the sentences read (the teacher giving the 
English), and in reproducing from memory sentences pre- 
viously read; writing French from dictation. 

Brooks, Chardenal, Complete French Course; Fontaine, Livre 
de Lecture et de Conversation; Guerber, Contes et Legendes II; 
Halevy, L'Abbe Constantin; etc. 

Course D. — 5 half -hours a week. (2 points.) Elementary 
French II. Continuation of previous work; reading of from 
250 to 400 pages of easy modern prose in the form of stories, 
plays, or historical or biographical sketches; constant practice, 
as in the preceding year, in translating into French easy varia- 
tions upon the text read; frequent abstracts, sometimes oral 
and sometimes written, of portions of the text already read; 
writing French from dictation; continued drill upon the 
rudiments of grammar, with constant application in the 
construction of sentences; mastery of the forms and use of 
pronouns, pronominal adjectives, of all but the rare irregular 
verb forms, and of the simpler uses of the conditional and 
subjunctive. 

Fraser and Squair, Abridged French Grammar; Labiche and 
Martin, Le Voyage de M. Perrichon; Lamartine, Jeanne d'Arc; 
La Brete, Mon Oncle et Mon Cure; Merimee, Colomba; or 
equivalents. 

Course M. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Intermediate 
French. The reading of from 300 to 500 pages of standard 
French of a grade less simple than in Course D, a portion of 
it in the dramatic form; constant practice in giving French 
paraphrases, abstracts or reproductions from memory of 



46 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

selected portions of the matter read; the completion of a 
standard grammar; writing from dictation; study of idioms. 

Fraser and Squair, Abridged French Grammar; Bouvet, French 
Syntax and Composition; Loti, Pecheur d'Islande; Sand, La Mare 
au Diable; Daudet, Lettres de mon Moulin; Bowen, Modern 
French Lyrics; and equivalents. 

Couese N. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Advanced 
French. The rapid reading of from 300 to 500 pages of 
French poetry and drama, classical and modern, only diffi- 
cult passages being explained in class; writing of numer- 
ous short themes in French; study of syntax; history of 
French Literature; idioms. 

Duval, Histoire de la Literature francaise; Hugo, Ruy Bias; 
Corneille's dramas; Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac; Renan's 
Souvenirs d'enfance et de jeunesse; Moliere's plays; or equivalents. 

German 

Mr. Stone. Miss 

The courses in German are exactly parallel to the corre- 
sponding courses in French. The amount of work required 
in each course and the methods are approximately the same. 

Course B. — (Preliminary). 5 half-hours a week. Study 
of the language begun. 

Collar, First Year German; Zschokke's Der Zerbrochene Krug. 

Course C. — 5 half -hours a week. (2 points.) Prerequisite: 
German B. Elementary German I. 

Joynes-Meissner, German Grammar; Storm's Immensee; 
Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche; Heyse's L'Arrabiata; selected 
poetry. 

Course D. — 5 half -hours a week. (2 points.) Elementary 
German II. Continuation of Course C. 

Joynes-Meissner, German Grammar (completed); Benedix' 
Der Prozess; Arnold's Fritz auf Ferien; Riehl's Der Fluch der 
Schonheit; Schiller's Wilhelm Tell; selected poetry. 



St. Mauy's School Bulletin. 47 

Course M. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Intermediate 
German. 

Freytag's Die Journalisten; Baumbach's Der Schwiegersohn; 
Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm; ScheffePs Der Trompeter von 
Sakkingen; Uhland's poems. 

Course N. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Advanced 
German. 

Holzwaith, German Literature, Land and People; Goethe's Her- 
mann und Dorothea; Lessing's Nathan der Weise; Schiller's Wal- 
lenstein; Scheffel's Ekkehard. 

Hattn 

Miss Urquhart. 

Pupils well grounded in English may complete Courses O 
and A in a single session. 

Course 0. — 5 half-hours a week. (Preliminary Course.) 
Study of the simple inflectional forms; marking of quanti- 
ties; reading aloud; translation of sentences from Latin into 
English, and from English into Latin; translation at hearing; 
easy connected Latin and English. 

Bennett, First Year Latin; Kirtland, Ritchie, Fabuloz Faciles 
(Perseus, Hercules). 

Course A. — 5 half -hours a week. Elementary Latin I. 
Review and continuation of work of Course 0; thorough 
review of forms with use of note-book; composition and 
derivation of words; systematic study of syntax of cases and 
verb. 

Bennett, First Year Latin, (rapidly reviewed); Ritchie's 
Fabuloe (completed) ; Rolfe, Viri Romas,; Bennett, Latin Grammar. 

Course B. — 5 half -hours a week. Elementary Latin II. 
Caesar. Continuation of preceding work; study of the 
structure of sentences in general, and particularly of the 
relative and conditional sentence, indirect discourse, and 
the subjunctive; sight translation; military antiquities. 

Bennett, Ccesar (Books I-IV); Bennett, Latin Grammar; 
Bennett, Latin Writer. 



48 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Elementary 
Latin III. — Cicero; continued systematic study of grammar; 
study of Roman political institutions; short passages mem- 
orized: prose and poetry at sight. 

Bennett, Cicero (four orations against Catiline, Archias, 
Manilian Law); D'Ooge, Latin Composition. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Elementary 
Latin IV. Virgil; continuation of preceding courses; prosody 
(accent, general versification, dactylic hexameter). 

Bennett's Virgil's Mneid (Books I-VI); Bennett, Latin Gram- 
mar; D'Ooge, Latin Composition. 

Course M. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Intermediate 
Latin I. The public and private life of the Romans as told 
in the Latin. Literature. Prose composition. Recita- 
tion; occasional explanatory lectures; parallel reading. (1) 
First half-year: The Roman Historians; (2) Second half- 
year: The Roman Poets. 

(1) Melhuish, Cape, Livy (Books XXI, XXII); Allen, Tacitus' 
Germania; (2) Page, Horace's Odes (Books I, II) ; Baker, Horace's 
Satires and Epistles (selected); (1, 2) Gildersleeve-Lodge, Latin 
Composition; Peck and Arrowsmith, Roman Life in Prose and 
Verse; Wilkins, Roman Antiquities. 

Course N. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Intermediate 
Latin II. Continuation of Course M. (1) First half-year: 
Roman Philosophy; (2) Second half-year: Roman Drama. 

(1) Shuckburgh, Cicero's de Senectute and de Amicitia; (2) 
Elmer, Terence's Phormio; (1, 2) Gildersleeve-Lodge, Latin 
Composition; Peck and Arrowsmith, Roman Life in Prose and 
Verse. 

45reefe 

Mr. Lay. 

Greek and Latin are considered as equivalents in all courses. 

Greek may be substituted in place of Latin, in whole or in 
part. Greek courses are offered by the school when there is 
a sufficient number of pupils to justify it. 

Course B. — 5 half -hours a week. Elementary Greek I. 



St. Maky's School Bulletin. 49 

First year Greek. Special attention to the mastery of forms 
and principal constructions. 

Ball, Elementary Greek Book; Macmillan, Greek Reader. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Elementary Greek 
II. Grammar; reading; composition; sight-reading. Meth- 
ods as in Latin. 

Goodwin, Greek Grammar; Goodwin, Xenophon's Anabasis 
(four books) ; Jones, Greek Prose Composition. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Elementary 
Greek III. Continuation of Course C. 

Goodwin, Greek Grammar; Seymour, Homer's Iliad (4,000 
lines) ; Daniell, Greek Prose Lessons. 

Jfflatfjematics; 

Miss Ricks. 

Certificate credit will not be given for Course C, 1 (Algebra). 
The pupil must either stand examination or take the subject 
at St. Mary's. 

Candidates for graduation must at least have credit for C 
Mathematics. 

Candidates for certificates must have at least finished Course B. 

Course A. — 5 periods a week. (1) Arithmetic. A thor- 
ough review of the fundamental principles. Special atten- 
tion to common and decimal fractions, and percentage and 
its applications. (2) Algebra. The study of elementary 
Algebra, as laid down in a first-year text-book. 

(1) Milne, Standard Arithmetic; (2) Wells, First Book in 
Algebra. 

Course X. — 5 periods a week. Complete Arithmetic. 
Commercial problems; review of common and decimal 
fractions; metric system; mental arithmetic; percentage and 
the applications; mensuration. Not counted for graduation. 
Intended especially for Business pupils. 

Course B. — 5 periods a week. Algebra through Quad- 
ratics. The four fundamental operations: factoring; frac- 
tions; complex fractions; linear equations (numerical and 

7 



50 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

literal, containing one or more unknown quantities); problems 
depending on linear equations; radicals (square root and cube 
root of polynomials and numbers); exponents (fractional 
and negative); quadratic equations (numerical and literal). 

Wells, New Higher Algebra. 

Course C— 5 hours a week. Prerequisite: Course B. 
(1) First half-year: Algebra, from Quadratics. (3 points.) 
Quadratic equations with one or more unknown quantities; 
problems depending on quadratic equations in quadratic 
form; the binominal theorem for positive integral exponents; 
ratio and proportion; arithmetical and geometrical progres- 
sions; numerous practical problems throughout. (2) Second 
half-year: Plane Geometry (complete). (2 points.) The 
usual theorems and constructions; the solution of numerous 
original exercises, including loci problems; applications to 
the mensuration of lines and plane surfaces. 

(1) Wells, New Higher Algebra; (2) Wentworth, Plane Geom- 
etry {Revised) (or) Wells, Essentials of Geometry. 

Course D. — 3 hours a week. Prerequisite: Course C. 
(1) First half-year: Solid Geometry. (/ 1—2 points.) The 
usual theorems and constructions; the solution of numerous 
original exercises, including loci problems; applications to 
the mensuration of surfaces and solids. (2) Second half- 
year: Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. (/ 1-2 points.) 
Definitions and relations of the six trigonometric functions as 
ratios; circular measurement of angles, proofs of the principal 
formulas and the transformation of trigonometric expressions 
by the formulas; solution of trigonometric equations of a 
simple character; theory and use of logarithms; solution of 
right and oblique triangles, and practical applications, 
including the solution of right spherical triangles. 

(1) Wells, Essentials of Geometry (or) Wentworth, Solid 
Geometry (Revised) ; (2) Wells, Complete Trigonometry. 

Course M. — 3 hours a week. Prerequisite: Course D. 
(1) First half-year; Advanced Algebra. (/ 1-2 points) Per- 



St. Maby's School Bulletin". 51 

mutations and combinations; complex numbers; determi- 
nants; undetermined coefficients; numerical equations of 
higher degree, logarithmic and exponential equations, and 
the theory of equations necessary to their treatment (Des- 
cartes' rule of signs; Horner's method). (2) Second half- 
year: Analytical Geometry. (/ 1-2 points.) Introduction 
to the analytical geometry of the plane and of space. Proof 
of formulas; original examples. 

(1) Wells, New Higher Algebra; (2) Tanner and Allen, Analytic 
Geometry. 

Course N. — 3 hours a week. Prerequisite: Course M. 
Calculus. (3 points.) Elementary course in the differential 
and integral calculus. 

Osborne, Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Natural Science 

Mr. Crtjikshank. 

Candidates for graduation must take at St. Mary's at least 
one biological and one physical science. 

The certificates of candidates for admission to the Freshman 
Class must show clearly the amount of work done in Physical 
Geography and Physiology. Unless enough has been done the 
pupil will be required to take these courses at St. Mary's. 

Courses Ca and Cb are given in alternate years; likewise 
Courses Da and Db. 

M and N Courses are offered when required. 

Course A. — 3 half-hours a week. General Elements of 
Science. A simple general treatment of the elementary 
facts of the various branches of natural science. 

Bert, First Steps in Scientific Knowledge. 

Course B 1 . — 3 half -hours a week, first half-year. Physical 
Geography. The study of a standard text-book to gain a 
knowledge of the essential principles and of well-selected 
facts illustrating those principles. 

Tarr, Principles of Physical Geography. 



52 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Course B2. — 3 half-hours a week, second half-year. 
Physiology. An elementary study of the human body and 
the laws governing its care. 

Martin, Human Body {Elementary Course). 

Course Ca. — 4 hours a week, second half-year. General 
Zoology. (2 points.) A general study of the principal forms 
of animal life, their structure, development, geographical 
distribution and adaptation, reproduction, etc. Individual 
laboratory work. 

Davenport, Introduction to Zoology. 

Course Cb.— 4 hours (3 hours recitation and demonstra- 
tion and one double hour laboratory practice) a week, second 
half-year. Elementary Botany. (2 points.) The general 
principles of anatomy and morphology, physiology, and 
ecology, and the natural history of the plant groups and 
classification. Individual laboratory work; stress laid upon 
diagrammatically accurate drawing and precise expressive 
description. 

Bailey, Botany. 

Course Da.— 4 hours (2 hours recitation and demonstra- 
tion, 2 double-hours laboratory) a week, first half-year. 
Elementary Chemistry. (2 points.) (a) Individual labora- 
tory work, comprising at least thirty-five exercises taken 
from the list recommended by the "Committee on Chem- 
istry." (b) Instruction by lecture-table demonstration, used 
as a basis for questioning upon the general principles in- 
volved in the pupil's laboratory investigations, (c) The 
study of a standard text-book supplemented by the use of 
many and varied numerical problems, to the end that a 
pupil may gain a comprehensive and connected view of the 
most important facts and laws in elementary chemistry. 

Remsen, Introduction to Chemistry (Briefer Course); Rem- 
sen, Chemical Experiments (or) Newell, Descriptive Chemistry 
(Parts I and II). 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 53 

Cotjese Db. — 4 hours (2 hours recitation and demonstra- 
tion, 2 double-hours laboratory work) a week. Elementary 
Physics. An exact parallel to the course in Chemistry 
(Course Da) in scope and method. 

Carhart and Chute, High School Physics. 

Mr. Lat. Mr. Stone. Mr. Cruikshank. 

The following courses are intended for general all-round 
development and are required of all candidates for graduation 
or certificate. 

Philosophy M 1 . — 2 hours a week, first half-year. (/ point.) 
Civil Government. The leading facts in the development 
and actual working of our form of government. (Mr. Stone.) 

Fiske, Civil Government. 

Philosophy M2. — 2 hours a week, second half-year. 
(/ point.) Political Economy. The principles of the science 
made clear and interesting by their practical application 
to leading financial and industrial questions of the day. 
(Mr. Stone.) 

Ely and Wicker, Elementary Economics. 

Philosophy Nl. — 2 hours a week, first half-year. (/ point.) 
Ethics. A general outline of the foundation principles, 
especially as applied to the rules of right living. (Mr. Lay.) 

Jannet, Elements of Morals. 

Philosophy N2. — 2 hours a week, second half-year. 
(/ point.) Evidences. Christianity portrayed as the per- 
fect system of ethics, and as the most complete evidence of 
itself. (Mr. Lay.) 

Fisher, Manual of Natural Theology; Manual of Christian 
Evidences. 

Psychology N. — 2 hours a week throughout the year. 
(2 points.) A brief introduction to the subject, the text- 



54 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 

book being supplemented by informal lectures and discussions. 
(Mr. Cruikshank.) 

Halleck, Psychology. 

?$Mz g>tubp 

Mr. Lay. Mr. Stone. 

Both Boarding and Day Pupils are required to take a one- 
hour course in Bible Study. On account of the varying 
lengths of time spent at the School by different pupils, the 
variation of the classes which they enter, and the difference in 
knowledge of the subject shown by members of the same col- 
lege class, it is difficult to arrange these courses in as sys- 
tematic a way as might be desired. 

Pupils are therefore assigned to Bible classes partly on the 
ground of age and partly on the ground of the amount of 
work done and the length of time spent at the School. 

There are four divisions pursuing separate courses. These 
courses are designed to cover the Old and New Testament 
and the History of the Bible, in two years; and then to give 
a fuller knowledge of these subjects to those pursuing a longer 
course at the School. 

The instruction is partly by lecture accompanied by the 
use of a uniform edition of the Bible (with references, dic- 
tionary, maps, etc.), as a text-book; and partly by Instruction 
Books. 

All Boarding Pupils are also required to take a half-hour 
course in one of the Sunday classes. These courses are either 
on the Bible, or the Prayer Book, or Church History. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 55 



Department of Music 



Miss Martha A. Dowd Director. 

(Cftc Jfacultp 

Miss Dowd Piano. 

Miss Scheper Piano. 

Miss Lunet Piano. 

Miss DeRosset Piano. 

Miss Dorroh Piano. 

Miss Luney Organ. 

Mr. Owen In charge of Voice. 

Miss Crafts Voice. 

Miss Crafts Violin. 

Miss Dowd History of Music, Theory. 

Miss Scheper Harmony. 

Mr. Owen Conductor of Chorus and Orchestra. 



General JUmarfes 

Music is both an Art and a Science. As such, the study 
of music is strong to train the mind, to touch the heart, and 
to develop the love of the beautiful. The importance of this 
study is being more and more realized by the schools, and its 
power felt as an element of education. No pains are spared 
in preparing the best courses of study, methods of instruction 
and facilities of work, in this department. Our country 
is becoming more and more a musical nation. 

It is the aim of the Music Department of St. Mary's to 
give students such advantages in technical training, in inter- 
pretative study, and in study of musical form and structure, 
as will enable them not only to develop their own talent, 



56 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

but also to hear, to understand, and to appreciate the beau- 
tiful in all music. 

The department is well equipped with a Miller, a Knabe, 
and a Steinway grand pianos, in addition to twenty-six other 
pianos and three claviers. The practice rooms are separate 
from the other buildings, and there is a beautiful Auditorium 
which seats six hundred and fifty people. 

Organ pupils are instructed on an excellent two-manual 
pipe organ, with twenty stops, and a pedal organ. During 
the past year a Kinetic electric blower has been put in, which 
adds greatly to the convenience of instruction and practice. 

Courses of study are offered in Piano, Voice, Organ, and 
Violin. 

Concerts ano Skecttate 

For the purpose of acquiring confidence and becoming ac- 
customed to appearing in public, all music pupils are required 
to meet once a week in the Auditorium for an afternoon 
recital. All music pupils take part in these recitals, which 
are open only to members of the School. 

Public recitals are given by the advanced pupils during 
the second term of the school year. 

Several Faculty recitals are given during the year and 
there are frequent opportunities for hearing music by artists, 
both at St. Mary's and in the city. 

tEfje Cfjotr 

No part of the School music is regarded as of more impor- 
tance than the singing in Chapel. The whole student body 
attends the services of the Chapel and takes part in the sing- 
ing. The best voices are chosen for the choir, which leads in 
all the Chapel music, and often renders special selections, 
and for this purpose meets once a week for special practice. 
The students in this way become familiar with chanting, 
with the full choral service, and with the best church music. 
Membership in the choir is voluntary, but pupils admitted 
to the choir are required to attend the weekly rehearsal. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 57 

The whole school is expected to join in the music of the 
Chapel services, and for this reason a rehearsal of the whole 
school is conducted by the Rector after the service in the 
Chapel on Saturday evenings. At the Sunday evening 
services four-part anthems are frequently rendered, and the 
organ accompaniment is supplemented by an orchestra. 

&fje Cijorus; Class: 

The Chorus Class is not confined to the music pupils, 
but is open to all students of the School, without charge. 
This training is of inestimable value, as it gives practice in 
sight reading and makes the pupil acquainted with the best 
choral works of the masters — an education in itself. 

Care is taken not to strain the voices and attention is paid 
to tone color and interpretation. The beauty and effect of 
chorus singing is in the blending of the voices, and to sing 
in chorus it is not necessary to have a good solo voice. 

This branch of the musical training is always enjoyed by 
the students, as everybody likes to sing, and almost every- 
body can sing. 

From the members of the Chorus Class voices are selected 
by the Chorus Conductor for special work in a Glee Club. 

Membership in the Chorus Class and in the Glee Club is 
voluntary. But parents are urged to require this work from 
their daughters, if they are deemed fit for it by the Con- 
ductor. When, however, a pupil is enrolled in either, attend- 
ance at rehearsals is compulsory, until the pupil is excused 
by the Rector at the request of the parent. 

<Efje 0vt\)tatva 

Students of the violin, if sufficiently advanced, are required 
to take part in the Orchestra, which is included in the regular 
work of the department. The Orchestra meets once a week 
in the St. Mary's Auditorium. It is composed of twenty-five 
members, students of the school and musicians from the city. 



58 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 

The Orchestra gives three public recitals during the year, the 
programs being made up of selections from the best orchestral 
writers. The practice in ensemble playing is of great value 
to the students and the work of the Orchestra is a source of 
interest and inspiration to the life of the whole Music Depart- 
ment. 

delation to tfje gcaoemic ©epartment 

Studies in the Music Department may be pursued in con- 
nection with full academic work, or may be the main pursuit 
of the student. 

Study in the Music Department is counted to a certain 
extent toward the academic classification of regular pupils 
of the Academic Department. The theoretical studies 
count the same as Academic studies. The technical work is 
given Academic credit in accordance with certain definite 
rules. (See page 61.) Not more than three points credit 
in Music in one year, nor more than twelve points in all can 
be counted toward graduation from the College. 

Pupils specializing in music are, as a rule, expected to take 
academic work along with their musical studies. This is in 
accordance with the prevailing modern ideals in professional 
studies and the pursuit of special branches which require 
some general education in addition to the acquirements of a 
specialist. Pupils from the city may take lessons in music 
only. Certificates in Music are awarded only to pupils who 
have completed the required minimum of academic work. 
(See page 61.) This requirement, which applies also to the 
Art and Elocution Departments, is designed to emphasize 
the fact that the school stands for thoroughness and breadth, 
and will not permit the sacrifice of a well-rounded education 
to over-development in any one direction. 

Classification in jfllusrtc 

Pupils entering the department are examined by the 
Director and assigned to a teacher. 
Thereafter, at the end of the first half-year (or earlier if 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 59 

advisable), the pupil's classification in music is decided and 
she is enrolled in the proper class. This determines her degree 
of advancement in her musical studies. 

The examinations for promotion are held semiannually. 
The marks in music indicate the quality of work, not the 
quantity. Promotion is decided by an examination, which 
shows both that the required amount of work has been done, 
and that it has been well done. 

Candidates for promotion or graduation, after satisfying 
the requirements in theoretical attainments, are required to 
perform certain stipulated programs before the Faculty of 
Music. 

To be classified in a given class in Music the pupil must 
have completed the entire work indicated below for the 
previous class or classes, and must take the whole of the work 
laid down for the class she wishes to enter. Instrumental 
or vocal work is not sufficient for enrollment in a given class 
without the theoretical work. 

Classification in music is entirely distinct from academic 
classification; but the satisfactory accomplishment of the 
full work of the Freshman or higher classes in music is counted 
toward academic graduation, provided the pupil is at that 
time a member of the College. 

Clares* in jHusitc 

(It should be carefully noted that the names of the classes 
as here used are of musical standing only, and do not refer 
to the academic class of which the same pupil may be a member.) 

The regular course is designed to cover a period of four 
years from the time of entering the Freshman class, but the 
thoroughness of the work is considered of far more impor- 
tance than the rate of advance. It may require two or more 
years to complete the work of the Preparatory class. 

Preparatory. — Theory 1 and Course 1 in Piano, or in Voice, 
or in Violin. 



60 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Freshman. — Theory 2 and Course 2 in Piano, or in Organ, 

or in Voice, or in Violin. 
Sophomore. — Theory 3 and Course 3 in Piano, or in Organ, or 

in Voice, or in Violin. 
Junior. — Harmony I, Music History 1, Ensemble Wor\ 

and Course 4 in Piano, or in Organ, or in Voice, or in 

Violin. 
Senior. — Harmony 2, Music History 2, Ensemble Work 

and Course 5 in Piano, or in Organ, or in Voice, or in 

Violin. 
For voice pupils the "Psychology of Singing" is substituted 
for 2d year Harmony. 

The Certificate of the Department is awarded under the 
following conditions: 

1. The candidate must have completed the work, theoretical 
and technical, of the Senior Class in the Music Department. 
(See above.) 

2. The candidate must have been for at least two years a 
pupil of the department. 

3. The candidate must have finished the technical work re- 
quired and have passed a satisfactory examination thereon, at 
least one-half year before the certificate recital which she must 
give at the end of the year. 

A Teacher's Certificate will be given in Piano, Organ, 
Violin or Voice, respectively, on the same conditions as the 
regular Certificate, with the following modifications. 

1. The applicant does not have to complete her technical 
work before the end of the year. 

2. She does not have to give a public recital. 

3. She must demonstrate by practice during her last year 
her ability to teach the subject in which she applies for the 
Teacher's Certificate. 

The Diploma, the highest honor in the Music Department, 
is awarded to a pupil who has already received the Certificate 
and who thereafter pursues advanced work in technique and 
nterpretation for at least one year at the school. This work 



St. Maky's School Bulletin. 61 

will be determined by the Music Faculty, and the candidate 
must pass an examination satisfactory to the Faculty and 
give a public recital in order to be entitled to this award. 

&cabemic Crebtt for Jfflustc Courses 

The theoretical work in Music is credited for academic 
classification as follows: 

Harmony I and II (one point each). 

Music History I and II (one point each). 

Total: 4 points. 

The foregoing studies are credited, like any academic sub- 
ject, only when the pupil has attained an average of 75 per 
cent on the recitations and examinations of the year. 

The technical work in Music is also credited for academic 
classification as follows: 

The completion at the School of the technical work in the 
Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, or Senior classes in Music will 
entitle the pupil to 3 points of academic credit for the work of 
each class thus completed under the following conditions: 

(1) Not more than three points may be earned in any one year 
in Piano, Voice, Violin, or Organ — whether one or more of these 
subjects is studied. 

(2) Not more than 12 points (one-fifth of the total amount 
required for graduation from the College) may be earned in 
all. 

(3) In order to be entitled to credit the pupil must be a member 
of the College. (Preparatory pupils may not count Music toward 
subsequent academic graduation.) 

(4) In order to be entitled to credit for the technical work 
of a given class in music, the pupil must also have completed 
satisfactorily the theoretical work of that class. 

(5) Promotion to a given course in technical work is evidence 
of the satisfactory completion of the work of the previous course. 

W$t jWimmum of Ucabemic GSHorfe &equireb for 
Certificates 

Candidates for Certificates in any subject in the College, 
the Music Department, the Art Department, or the Elocu- 
tion Department, must have completed the following mini- 



62 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

mum of academic work. This work must have been done 
at St. Mary's, or be credited by certificate or examination in 
accordance with the regular rules for credits. 

(1) The A and B Courses in English, History, Mathematics, 
Science, and in either Latin or French or German. 

(2) The C and D Courses in English and in History. 

(3) Such other C and D Courses as will amount to "eight 
points" of Academic credit. 

For example: 

Mathematics C and D; 

or Latin C and D; 

or French C and D and German C and D; 

or Math. C and Science C and D ; 

or Latin C and French C and D, etc. 

It will be observed that the above covers the requirements for 
entrance to the Freshman Class of the Academic Department with 
"20 points" in college work. ("60 points" is the requirement for 
an Academic Diploma.) 

W$t Course* 

The courses in Music are divided into Theoretical (includ- 
ing for convenience History of Music) and Technical. 

tEfjeoretical Courses 

Theory 1. (Miss Dorroh.) One hour a week. 

Cummings, Rudiments of Music. 
Theory 2. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. 

Virgil, Exercises for the Study of Time and Practical Instruc- 
tion in Ear Training; Rhythm; Elementary Exercises in 
Sight Reading; Gow, Structure of Music. 
Theory 3. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. 

The Scale. Shepherd, Simplified Harmony. Ear-training 
continued. Sight Reading. Bitter, Musical Dictation. 
Harmony 1. (Miss Scheper.) One hour a week. One point* 

Emery, Lessons in Harmony. 
Harmony 2. (Miss Scheper.) One hour a week. One point* 

Emery, Lessons in Harmony (continued). 
History op Music 1. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. One 
point* 

Barry, History of Music; Elson, Club Programs of All Nations. 



*These points count on the academic standing of the pupil, provided she is 
already enrolled as a full member of a college class. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 63 

History op Music 2. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. One 
paint* 

Pauer, Musical Form. 

QTecfymcal Courses 

In general, each course corresponds to a year's work for a 
pupil with musical taste. But even faithful work for some 
pupils may require more than a year for promotion. 

•piano 

Course I. — All major scales in chromatic order, hands to- 
gether, quarter note M.M. 100. Harmonic and melodic 
minor scales, hands separate, eighth note M.M. 100. Major 
arpeggios, hands separate, quarter note M.M. 80. Studies, 
Duvernoy 176; Kohler op. 157, 242; Heller op. 47; Burg- 
muller op. 100. Easier sonatinas by Lichner, Clementi, 
Kuhlau, etc. Read at sight first-grade piece. 

Course II. — Major scales, hands together, quarter note M.M. 
116. Harmonic and melodic minor scales, hands separate, 
quarter note M.M. 100; together M.M. 80. Arpeggios, 
major and minor, hands separate, quarter note 92. 
Duvernoy op. 120; Czerny 636; Le Couppey op. 20; Heller 
op. 46; Bach Little Preludes and Fugues. One major 
scale on octaves, hands separate, eighth note M.M. 120. 
Turner Octaves op. 28. Vogt Octaves. Sonatinas Kuhlau, 
Diabelli, etc. Read at sight second-grade piece. 

Course III. — Harmonic and melodic minor scales, hands to- 
gether, quarter note M.M. 116. Arpeggios, major and 
minor, hands together, quarter note M.M. 92. Major 
scales in octaves in chromatic order, hands separate, quar- 
ter note M.M. 72. Three scales in thirds, sixths, tenths, 
and contrary motion, quarter note M.M. 100. Czerny 299; 
Berens op. 61; Kraus op. 2; Heller op. 45; Bach Two-Part 
Inventions. Easier Sonatas Clementi, Mozart, Haydn, 
Beethoven. Read at sight third-grade piece. 

Course IV. — Minor scales, hands together, quarter note M.M. 
132. Major and minor arpeggios, hands together, M.M. 
116. Three minor (melodic and harmonic) scales in in- 
tervals M.M. 100. Major scales in octaves, hands together 
M.M. 72. Scale of C in double-third, hands separate, 



*These points count on the academic standing of the pupil, provided she is 
already enrolled as a full member of a college class. 



64 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

eighth note M.M. 100. Bach French Suites, Three-part 
Inventions. Cramer Etudes. Clementi "Gradus ad Par- 
nassum" sonatas. Read at sight a third-grade piece or 
play a simple accompanient. 
Course V. — Six major scales and six minor scales (three har- 
monic and three melodic), in intervals M.M. 116. Arpeg- 
gios, dominant and diminished 7ths, hands together, M.M. 
116. All major scales in double thirds, hands separate, 
M.M. 72. Advanced studies in interpretation in prepara- 
tion for public recital. Public recital. 

"Voitt 

Course 1. — Breathing, tone placement and tone development. 
Sight singing. Studies by Wm. Shakespeare, a pupil of 
the great Francesco Lamperti. Sieber, eight-measure 
studies. Concone Marchesi, Bordogni. Nava, Elements of 
Vocalization. Simple Songs and Ballads. 

Course 2. — Management of breath, sight singing. Studies by 
Lamperti, Solfeggio Concone Vocalises. Bordogni Easy 
Vocalises, Marchesi Vocalises, Righnini Exercises, Vaccai 
Method. Modern songs and easy classics. 

Course 3. — Spiker, Masterpieces of Vocalization, Books 1-2. 
Mazzoni Vocalises. Concone, Vocalises. Lamperti, Studies 
in Bravura. Viardot, An Hour of Study 1. Classic songs 
and arias. 

Course 4. — Otta Vocalizzi, Vannini. Bona, Rhythmical Articu- 
lation; Viardot, An Hour of Study 2. Spiker, Master- 
pieces of Vocalization, Books 3-4. Manuel Jarcia, Studies. 

Course 5. — Classic Songs. Concert, Oratorio-Opera-Colorature- 
Singing; Roulades and embellishment. Public recital. 

©rgan 

Practical instruction is given from the first rudiments to 
the highest difficulties of the instrument, both in its use as an 
accompaniment to the different styles of Church music, 
and in the various methods of the employment of the organ 
as a solo instrument. 

Opportunity is given to acquire confidence and experience 
by practice in accompanying the services of the Chapel, 
beginning with the easier work at the daily services of the 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 65 

School and going on through the accompaniment of anthems 
and more elaborate services on Sunday. 

Course 1. — The organ pupil must have enough work in piano 
to enable her to enter the Freshman Class in piano. This 
constitutes the preparatory work for the organ course. 

Course 2. — Clemens' Organ School. Bach's Eight Short Pre- 
ludes and Fugues. Easy Preludes and Fugues by Merkel 
and Batiste. Horner's Pedal Studies Book. 

Course 3. — Buck's Pedal Studies. Bach's Preludes and Fugues. 
Light Solos for the Organ by Wely, Batiste, DuBois. Studies 
by Buck, Guilmant, Lemare. Service playing. 

Course 4. — Bach's Greater Fugues. Carl's Master Studies. 
Sonatas by Mendelssohn, Widor, Guilmant, Wolstenholme . 
Service playing. 

Course 5. — Standard Overtures of the Old and Modern Mas- 
ters. Service playing. Public recital. 

An advanced piano pupil might do the work of two of the 
above courses in one year. 

V tolitt 

The course in Violin is indicated in the summary given 
below. Pupils of the department, if sufficiently advanced, 
are required to take part in the Orchestra, which is included 
in the regular work of the department. 

Course 1. — Exercises and studies by Heming, David (Part I). 

Dancla, Hofman op. 25, Wohlfahrt op. 45. Easy solos by 

Hauser, Sitt, Dancla, Papini, etc. 
Course 2. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, David (Part 

II), Sevcik op. 6, Kayser op. 37. Solos adapted to the 

needs of pupils. 
Course 3. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, David (Part 

II,) Sevcik op. 6, op. 8, op. 9, Dont, Kayser op. 20, Kreut- 

zer. Solos by DeBeriot, Dancla, etc. Modern composers. 
Course 4. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, Sevcik, Rode, 

Kreutzer. Sonatas, Concertos by Viotti, Spohr, DeBeriot, 

etc. 
Course 5. — Exercises and studies by Sevcik, Mazas, FioriUio. 

Sonatas, Concertos. Public recital. 

A knowledge of piano, sufficient to play second grade pieces 
at least, is required in the case of pupils in the last two courses. 

9 



66 St. Maby's School Bulletin. 

Art Department 

Miss Clara Fenner, Director. 

The aim of the Art Department is to afford an opportunity 
for serious study, and to give a thorough Art education, which 
will form the basis of further study in the advanced schools 
of this country and abroad; also, to enable pupils who com- 
plete the full course to become satisfactory teachers. All 
work is done from nature. 

The Studio is open daily during school hours. Candidates 
for a certificate in the Art Department must pass satis- 
factorily the course in Drawing, Painting, and the History of 
Art, and must also satisfy the academic requirements for a 
certificate as stated on pages 61-62. 

The technical work in the Art Course, leading to a certifi- 
cate, ordinarily requires a period of three years for comple- 
tion. About half of this time is required for Drawing, and 
the second half for Painting. 

I. Drawing. The pupil is first instructed in the free- 
hand drawing of geometric solids, whereby she is taught the 
fundamentals of good drawing, the art of measuring correctly, 
and the drawing of straight and curved lines. This work is 
exceedingly important. 

Next the pupil is taught drawing from still-life, with shad- 
ing; the drawing of plants; of casts; original designs — con- 
ventional and applied — in black and white, and in color; 
and pencil sketches from nature. 

After this comes charcoal drawings; or shading in pen and 
ink; or wash-drawings in monochrome as in magazine illus- 
trating. 

II. Painting. This includes work in oil and in water 
color. 

The student is required to paint two large still-life groups; 
two large landscapes; two flower studies, one a copy and one 
from nature; several sketches from nature, and two original 
designs. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 67 

III. History of Art. — This study includes the history of 
Architecture, Sculpture, and Painting. This course is 
important and is required of all pupils in the regular art 
course. 

Special Courses. — Pupils who do not wish to take the 
regular course may take any of the above courses or of the 
following special courses: 

1. Flower Painting. — Special attention is given to flower 
painting in water color. 

2. Still-life Painting. — This work is preparatory to more 
advanced work in the flower painting and life classes. Either 
oil or water color may be used as a medium. 

3. China Painting. 

4. Life Class. — A living model is provided from which the 
pupils may draw and paint. 

5. Sketch Club. — This club is formed of pupils who take 
turn in posing in costume. The same model poses only once. 
During the spring and fall months outdoor sketching from 
nature is done. 

6. Advanced Antique. — All classes are graded according to 
this work. Drawing from Greek antiques in charcoal is required 
of all pupils taking the full course. 

7. Composition Class. — This class is one of the most im- 
portant in the department, and makes for the development of 
the creative and imaginative faculties. Subjects are given and 
"pictures" must be painted and submitted for criticism on 
certain days in the term. 

8. Design Class. — This work is planned according to the 
principles originated and applied by Arthur W. Dow, and is a 
combination of the Occidental and Oriental principles. A close 
study of nature and an original imaginative use of her forms 
in design is the keynote of this method. 

9. Architectural and Mechanical Drawing. — To supply 
the demand for women draftsmen in architects' offices, a special 
course in Architectural and Mechanical Drawing is offered by 
the School. The course begins with geometrical figures, pro- 
jections of objects, and leads up gradually to the highest forms of 
architectural work. .:' ',.'■ 

10. Ptrography. — Apart from the regular work, some mem- 
bers of the Art Class have shown much interest in recent sessions 
in the work of this class. 

11. Stenciling. — This class offers an opportunity for applying 
a knowledge of designing. 



68 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 



Business Department 

Miss Lizzie H. Lee, Director. 

The Business Department of St. Mary's was established 
in 1897 to meet the growing demand for instruction in the 
commercial branches, which are more and more affording 
women a means of livelihood. The course is planned to 
accomplish this purpose as nearly as possible. 

The curriculum embraces thorough instruction in Stenog- 
raphy, Typewriting, Manifolding, etc.; Bookkeeping, Arith- 
metic, Penmanship, and English. 

Pupils taking, as is advised, the course in connection with 
academic work, would ordinarily complete the Business 
Course in one school year. 

Pupils may take either the full course or any part of it. 

Graduates of the Department have been universally suc- 
cessful in their practical business engagements, and are the 
best recommendation for the work of the department. 

Skequtremente 

In order to be well prepared to take the course to advantage, 
pupils before entering the Business Department should have 
satisfactorily completed the work of the Preparatory School 
or its equivalent. 

Attention is called to the fact that the services of a stenog- 
rapher and her ability to command a high salary depend not 
so much on her technical skill in actual typewriting and 
stenography, to which much may be added by practice after- 
wards, but to the preliminary mental equipment with which 
she undertakes her technical preparation. 

gtamrfeg 

The Business Certificate is awarded those pupils who 
complete the work of the full course, including all the work 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 69 

required for certificates in Stenography, Typewriting and 
Bookkeeping, including the academic course in English 
(English C), Commercial Arithmetic and Commercial 
Geography. 

The Diploma of the department is reserved for those pupils 
who in addition to completing the work required for the 
Business Certificate have the mental equipment to do unusu- 
ally good work in their profession, and who have demon- 
strated their fitness for such work by actual practice. 

Certificates in Stenography, Typewriting or Bookkeeping 
are awarded pupils who have completed the respective 
requirements stated below. 

Course 

In Stenography, the Isaac Pitman System of Shorthand 
is used. This is the standard system, the most practical 
of all systems, is easily acquired, and meets all the demands 
of the amanuensis and the reporter. 

The Smith Premier Typewriter is the machine used in 
this department. 

The work of the courses and the requirements for Certi- 
ficates are as follows: 

Stenography. — The texts used are Isaac Pitman's Short 
Course in Shorthand, Business Correspondence in Shorthand 
Nos. 1 and 2, and Book of Phrases and Constructions. In con- 
nection with the texts, the following books from the Isaac Pitman 
shorthand library are used in class for reading and dictation 
purposes: Vicar of Wakefield, Irving's Tales and Sketches, Ma- 
caulay's Warren Hastings, Dickens' Haunted Man, Leaves from 
the Note Book of Thomas Allen Reed, etc. 

The pupils are taught Manifolding, Composition, Punctuation, 
Spelling, Business Forms, Correspondence, and Reporting. 

To receive the Certificate, the pupil must have completed 
the required work in the foregoing; must have attained a speed 
of at least 80 words a minute from dictation; and must have 
completed the work of C English in the Academic Department. 

A Certificate in Stenography will not be given, unless the pupil 
has also taken the course in Typewriting. 



70 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 

Typewriting. — The touch system is used, and to obtain the 
Certificate the pupil must have attained a speed of 50 words 
a minute from dictation; 1+0 words from printed matter; and 
SO words from stenographic notes; and must have completed 
the work of C English. 

Bookkeeping. — For the first principles of the subject, Allen's 
Forty Lessons in Bookkeeping is used as a guide. As the student 
advances, the instruction becomes thoroughly practical, a regular 
set of books is opened, and the routine of a well-ordered business 
house thoroughly investigated and practically pursued. The 
object is to prepare the pupil to fill a position immediately after 
graduation from the School. 

For the Certificate, in addition to the technical work in Book- 
keeping, the course in Commercial Arithmetic (Math. X) must 
be completed. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 71 



Elocution Department 

Miss Davis, Director. 

The purpose of this course is to supply a recognized demand 
on the part of many parents for special instruction of pupils 
in the elocutionary art; in order to prepare them to give 
intelligent expression to choice selections of prose and poetry. 

As a physiological study, the course is of great value in 
teaching the healthfulness of deep breathing, of the proper 
carriage of the body, and of the proper use of the vocal muscles. 

Pupils are trained singly and in classes. 

Pupils in this department have given in recent years very 
creditable performances of A Midsummer Night's Dream, 
She Sloops to Conquer, As You Li\e It, and other lighter plays. 



72 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 



Domestic Science Course 

Miss 

The general purpose of this course is to give a practical 
knowledge of housekeeping, including a knowledge of the 
processes of digestion, and the nutritive value of foods. It is 
intended to give certain necessary and definite ideas in house- 
keeping and in making the home clean, sanitary, attractive, 
and homelike. 

Pupils are taught how to buy, prepare, and serve food that 

is reasonable in cost, nutritious in food-value, wholesome in 

effect, and appetizing and attractive when served on the table. 

To accomplish these purposes the practical work of the 

course includes the study of: 

(1) Cooking: Laboratory and lecture work; classes in the 
theory and practice of cookery. 

(2) Foods: Their history, care, composition, cost, and nutri- 
tive value. 

(3) Dietetics: The waste and nutrition of the human body; 
the kinds and proportions of food required under varied condi- 
tions of life; the calculations of dietaries; the practical compari- 
son of dietaries. 

The fee for the course, including instruction and labora- 
tory fee, is $15.00 for the session. 

The work in Domestic Science is considered of great im- 
portance, and it is hoped that in the near future it will be 
possible to add lessons in Sewing and other domestic arts. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 



General School Regulations 

The effort of St. Mary's School is to maintain, as far as 
possible, the family life of the students entrusted to its care. 

Day pupils are expected to conform to all the household 
requirements of the school while present. 

The desire of parents will always be carefully considered, 
but the final authority in all cases is vested with the Rector. 
It is understood that in sending a pupil to the School the 
parent agrees to submit to such rules as the Rector thinks 
necessary for the good of the School as a whole. 

Parents wishing pupils to have special permission for any 
purpose, should communicate directly with the Rector, 
and not through the pupil. 

No pupil will be permitted to take less than the minimum 
hours of work. 

Written explanations must be presented by pupils request- 
ing excuse for absence, tardiness, or lack of preparation in 
any duty. 

In accepting the responsibility for the care of the students 
at St. Mary's, it is necessary to state that no boarding pupils 
are desired whose sense of honor is not sufficiently developed 
to make it possible to trust them (1) not to endanger life and 
property by forbidden use of fire, (2) not to go off the ample 
school grounds without permission, and (3) not to be out 
of their proper place when they are expected to be in bed. 

gttenbance 

All pupils are required to arrive in time for the opening 
of the School session and to remain until its close. 

^oltbapsf 

The only recess, or holiday, when pupils are allowed to 
leave the School, is at the time of the Christmas vacation. 

10 



74 St. Maet's School Bulletin. 

This holiday, as a rule, is of two weeks' duration. The 
whole School is required to be present on time at the close 
of the Christmas vacation. 

There is no Thanksgiving or Easter holiday, and pupils 
are not to leave the school at these seasons. Thanksgiving 
Day is a free day to be celebrated in the School, and Good 
Friday is a Holy Day, but except for these the school duties 
are uninterrupted. 

&b&tnte 

With the exception noted below, pupils are not allowed to 
leave the School except in cases of severe illness or for some 
other reason so serious as to seem sufficient to the Rector. 
The application should be made as early as possible directly 
by the parent to the Rector, in writing, if possible. 

Exception. If the pupil's record warrants it, the Rector 
will allow a pupil one or two visits a year to her home, simply 
on the request of the parent that she be allowed to do so, the 
pupil leaving the School after 3 p. m. Saturday and returning 
the following Monday evening. The request should be made 
at least a week beforehand. 

While the Rector will cheerfully grant such permissions, 
in a session of only thirty-two weeks with a recess at Christ- 
mas, all such absences are highly undesirable for the sake of 
the pupil and the whole school. 

No such permission whatever can be allowed within one 
week of Thanksgiving Day, or Washington's Birthday, or 
from Palm Sunday to Easter inclusive. 

The presence of a parent in Raleigh does not in any respect 
absolve a pupil from any regulations of the School without 
permission from the Rector, and obedience to the conditions 
governing such permissions is a matter between the pupil 
and the Rector alone. The Rector is glad to have parents 
visit their daughters in Raleigh as often and for as long a time 
as may be convenient to them, and he will take pleasure in 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 75 

granting all possible privileges, not inconsistent with the 
welfare of the School, to enable parent and daughter to see 
each other. In general, pupils are not excused during school 
hours, and no exception is made to this rule, except where a 
parent from a distance happens to stop over in Raleigh for only 
an hour or two. Except for very serious necessity, parents 
are urgently requested not to ask that their daughters come 
to the Railway Station to meet them. No pupil is allowed 
to spend the night outside of the School except with her 
mother, or one who sustains a mother's relation to her. 

Visitors are not desired on Sunday. Ladies from the city 
are heartily welcome on afternoons other than Saturday 
or Sunday between half -past three and half -past five. The 
members of the Faculty assisted by some of the pupils receive 
on Wednesdays from four to half -past five. 

All visitors are received in the parlor. 

Invitations to pupils should be sent through the Rector. 

Cfjurcfj &ttenfcance 

Town pupils as well as boarding pupils are expected to 
attend the daily Chapel service at 8:30 a. m. As St. Mary's 
is distinctly a Church school, all boarding pupils are required 
to attend all Chapel services. 

©ormttortes anb 3&ooms 

The assignment of pupils to quarters will be determined 
on the basis of date of formal application, age, classification, 
and length of time at the School. To obtain a room assigned 
a pupil must arrive on time. 

In assigning pupils to rooms, the Rector does not waive 
the right to change a pupil, at any time, from a room to a 
dormitory, if in his judgment it is best for the discipline of 
the School. 

Pupils are advised to spend their first year in a dormitory. 



76 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Communications! 

All telegrams for the pupils should be addressed to the 
Rector. All letters with regard to the pupils should be 
addressed to the Rector, but when desired communications 
pertaining to their health and personal welfare may be 
addressed to the Lady Principal. 

Correspondence with the home circle is freely encouraged, 
but beyond this there is no time, even were it otherwise de- 
sirable, for letter writing. 

Parents will confer a favor by consulting simplicity in the 
dress of their daughters. 

All pupils are expected to wear white muslin dresses at 
Commencement and at all public entertainments given by 
the School. 

Simple high-neck dresses should be worn by the pupils 
on all public occasions. 

Dressmaking, should, so far as possible, be attended to 
at home, as there is neither time nor opportunity for it while 
at St. Mary's. 

pocket Jfflonep 

The Rector can not advance funds to pupils for books, 
stationery, pocket money, or for any purpose, without pre- 
vious and special arrangements with parents. Money for 
these purposes should always be deposited with the School at 
the beginning of each session. The cost of books, stationery, 
sheet music, and art material should not ordinarily exceed 
$25.00 for the year. Pocket money should in all cases be 
limited and should be deposited with the Rector, to be paid 
on call under the parent's direction. These figures refer to 
actual necessities, not to foolish indulgences. 

Bills must positively not be contracted at the stores and the 
merchants are notified to this effect. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 77 

General Btectpltne 

With regard to discipline, it is desired to have as few rules, 
and to grant as many privileges as possible. But in so large 
a community the rules must be obeyed and enforced uni- 
formly and the privileges must be withdrawn, if they are 
abused or work injury to the individual and the School, 
and it must be remembered that no privilege can be allowed 
to any on'which could not, under similar circumstances be 
allowed to all who ask for it. In working together for the 
good of the whole School both parents and the School author- 
ities will in the end succeed best in securing the good of each 
individual. 



Parents, please remember that your daugh- 
ter's character depends on learning the duty 
of obedience to law and order. 



78 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 



Terms 

All regular fees are due and must be paid quarterly in 
advance. 

Pupils are required to register at the beginning of each 
half-year, and no pupil will be allowed to register until all 
past fees have been paid. 

Pupils are not received for less than a half-year, or the 
remainder of a half-year. As a matter of simple justice to 
the School, parents are asked to give ample notice of inten- 
tion to withdraw a pupil at the end of the half-year. 

No deduction is made for holidays or for absence or with- 
drawal of pupils from school, except in cases of protracted 
sickness. In cases of absence or withdrawal for protracted 
sickness the School and the parent will divide losses for the 
remainder of the half-year. 

entrance 

An Entrance Fee is required of all boarding pupils at the 
time of filing application for entrance, as a guarantee for 
holding place. This fee is in no case returned, but on the 
entrance of the pupil is credited to her regular account. 

The Entrance Fee to reserve an alcove in one of the Dormi- 
tories is $5. 

The Entrance Fee to reserve a room-place in East Rock 
House, West Rock House, Main Building, or North Dormi- 
tory is $10. 

The Entrance Fee to reserve a room-place in East Wing or 
West Wing is $25. 

The difference in charge for the various rooms, correspond- 
ing to their desirability and location, is made largely for the 
convenience of patrons. The uniform charge in the past 
has led to some misunderstanding. It is hoped that the 
payment of a definite fee, graded according to location, will 
obviate all difficulties. 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 79 

Regular Cfjargesf 

Boarding Pupils. — The regular charge for the school 
year is $281, including an alcove in one of the Dormitories, 
for which there is no extra charge. This includes all living 
expenses (except room rent for pupils in rooms) and all 
regular school fees in the Academic or Business Departments. 
Charges in the Music, Art and Elocution Departments are 
extra. There is no extra charge for Languages. 

Pupils occupying room-places in East Wing or West Wing 
are charged $25 room rent; in the other buildings $10. 

The regular charge for the school year includes : 

Board, light, fuel, alcove $ 200 

Academic Tuition 50 

Laundry 20 

Contingent, Medical and Library Fees 11 

$ 281 
Room rent according to room, $10 or 25. 

Local Pupils. — The full regular charge is $53. 50. 

Academic Tuition $50. 00 

Contingent Fae 2. 50 

Library Fee 1. 00 

$53. 50 
Pupils of the Primary Department are charged $30. 

€xtra Cfjargeg 

iHugic department 

Piano, Organ, or Violin $50 

If from the Director 60 

Vocal 60 

Use of Piano for practice 5 

Use of Organ for practice 10 

This charge is for one hour's practice each school day during 
the session. Additional practice is charged for at the same rates. 

Theory of Music, History of Music, or Harmony $ 1 

Music pupils are required to take one of these three subjects. 



80 St. Maby's School Bulletin. 

g(rt department 

Drawing, etc $30 

Painting in oil or water color 50 

Art History 10 

Work in special classes at special rates. 

i3usinefi£ department 

Regular tuition : $50 

This includes any or all of the business branches, with English 
and Arithmetic. No reduction is made for a partial course, 
except as follows: 

Typewriting alone $15 

Bookkeeping alone 25 

The fee includes the use of typewriter. 

elocution department 

Private Lessons $50 

Lessons in Class 10 

BomeSttc Science Course 

Tuition and Laboratory Fee $15 

Occasional JfeeS 

Laboratory Fee. — A fee of from $3 to $5 is charged 
pupils using the Science Laboratory. 

This fee is to cover cost of material and varies with the course. 

Graduation Fee. — A fee of $2 is charged each pupil 
receiving a Diploma in any department; and a fee of $1 is 
charged each pupil receiving a Certificate. 

Snctfcental Charges 

These are not properly school charges, but are simply 
charges for materials or money which the school furnishes 
to the pupil as a convenience to the parent. 

A statement of the Incidental Account is sent quarterly. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 81 

Parents are requested to make an Incidental Deposit to 
cover the cost of materials bought by the school and furnished 
to the pupils, and also to provide pocket money. As these 
charges will vary with need, no definite statement can be 
made, but ordinarily $25 for the year will be sufficient in 
addition to the allowance for pocket money. 

Sheet Music and Art Materials are furnished by the school 
and charged at cost. 

Books and stationery will be furnished by the school if 
a deposit is made for this purpose. 

It is advisable that the pocket money should be furnished 
only through the Rector, and it is urged that the amount 
should not exceed one dollar a week. 

explanatory Statement of Regular Charges 

The regular charges given in concise form on page 79 may be 
further explained as follows: 

Academic Tuition. — The charge ($50) is the same for a 
full course or a partial course. 

A pupil, however, taking only one or two classes, is charged 
$20 a class. 

Laundry. — The laundry fee for the year is $20. For 
this each pupil is allowed an average of $ 1 . 50 worth of laun- 
dry each week, or $48 worth for the year, at regular laundry 
prices. Additional pieces are charged extra at half rates. 
Laundry lists with prices will be sent on request. Pupils are 
expected to limit the number of fancy pieces. 

Contingent Fee. — An annual contingent fee of $5 for 
house pupils and $2. 50 for day pupils is charged all pupils. 

Medical Fee. — All boarding pupils will pay a medical fee 
of $5 for the year. This fee entitles the pupils to the atten- 
tion of the School Physician in all cases of ordinary sickness, 
and to such ordinary medical supplies as may be needed with- 
out further charge. All special prescriptions are charged 
extra. 



82 St. Maky's School Bulletin. 

Pupils whose parents prefer to have some other than the 
School Physician may, with the Rector's consent, call in 
some other reputable physician at their own expense. 

Library. — An annual fee of $1 is charged all pupils for 
the use of the library. 

23cuucttons 

A deduction of 10 per cent in the tuition charge is made in 
the case of pupils who take Vocal and Instrumental Music, 
Piano and Elocution, Music and Art, and like combinations. 
This deduction is made only to pupils who pay Academic tuition. 

A deduction of $20 for the year is made in the charges when 
two or more boarding pupils enter from the same family. 

A deduction of 10 per cent of the tuition charge is made when 
two or more day pupils enter from the same family. 

These deductions are all conditional on the bill being paid in 
advance. 

Boarding pupils are expected to bring with them — 
Bed-linen for single bed. 
4 sheets, 54 x 90, 
3 pillow-cases, 1 9 x 34, 
2 counterpanes, white, 
1 pair blankets, 
6 towels, 

6 napkins and ring, 
Cloak or cape, 
Umbrella, 
Overshoes. 
These, and all articles of clothing, must be distinctly 
marked with the owner's name. 

Teachers are expected to furnish the same requisites for 
their apartments. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 83 



Full information concerning all the Scholarships at St. Mary's is published 
in Bulletin Scholarships, which may be had by writing to the School. 



Scholarships in St. Mary's 



Compettttbe i^cfjolarsfnpg 

1. The David R. Murchison Scholarship, endowed 1903 

($300). 

2. The Smedes Memorial (Alumnae) Scholarship, endowed 

1904 ($270). 
These scholarships, when vacant, are filled by competitive 
examination of qualified applicants. Neither of them will, 
in ordinary course, be again vacant until May, 1913. 

J|on=Comjpetittrje ikfjolarsifjtpg 

tuition fecfjolarsfjipg ($50) 

1. Clergy Scholarships. For daughters of the clergy- 

Not limited in number. Allotted by the Rector of 
St. Mary's. 

2. Raleigh City Schools Scholarship. One filled each 

year. The holder is nominated by the Principal of the 
Raleigh High School. 

3. Sass Scholarship. For pupils of Misses Sass' School, 

Charleston, S. C. The holder nominated by Miss 
Sass. 

4. Mary Ruffln Smith Scholarship of the Diocese of 

North Carolina. The holder nominated by the Bishop 
of the Diocese. 

Jgoarb anil tuition g>d)olargf)ipa ($250) 

1 . Mary Ruffln Smith Scholarships of the Diocese of 
North Carolina. (Two.) The holders nominated by 
the Bishop of the Diocese. 



84 St. Maby's School Bulletin. 

2. Mary E. Chapeau Scholarship of the Diocese of North 

Carolina. The holder nominated by the Bishop of 
the Diocese. Primarily for daughters of the clergy. 

3. Mary E. Chapeau Scholarship of the Diocese of East 

Carolina. The holder nominated by the Bishop of 
East Carolina. Primarily for daughters of the clergy. 

4. The Madame Clement Memorial Scholarship, 

founded 1905. The holder nominated by the Presi- 
dent of the Board of Trustees after conference with 
his fellow Bishops of the Board. 

5. The Eliza Battle Pittman Scholarships. (Two.) 

The holders residents of Edgecombe County, North 
Carolina. Nominated by the Rector and Vestry of 
Calvary Church, Tarboro, N. C. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 85 



The Alumnae of St. Mary's 



Officers; of tfjc £§>t. jWarp'g Alumnae gtesfoctatton 
for 1911-12 

Mrs. Mary Iredell, Honorary President Raleigh, N. C. 

Mrs. Kate deR. Meares, Honorary Vice-Pres... Wilmington. N. C. 

Mrs. A. W. Knox, President Raleigh. N. C. 

Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson, Vice-President Richmond, Va. 

Miss Kate McKimmon, Secretary . . . .St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 
Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Treasurer Raleigh, N. C. 

SUumnae Council 

Mrs. Wm. E. Shipp, Raleigh, N. C until 1914 

Miss Sarah Cheshire, Raleigh, N. C until 1914 

Miss Annie G. Root, Raleigh, N. C until 1913 

Mrs. R. C. Strong, Raleigh, N. C until 1913 

Miss Mary F. Henderson, Salisbury, N. C. . until 1912 
Mrs. Albert L. Cox, Raleigh, N.C until 1912 



Miss Anna N. Buxton, Winston-Salem, N- C, Traveling Secretary. 



The Alumnae Association of St. Mary's, which was first 
established in 1880 and meets annually at Commencement, 
has done effective work in aiding the progress of the School, 
and grows yearly stronger and more vigorous. 

In addition to constant assistance rendered St. Mary's by 
the individual members, the Association has completed two 
special works of importance and is now actively engaged 
on the third. 

(1) The Foundation of the Smedes Memorial Scholarship 
in St. Mary's, in memory of the founder and first Rector 
of St. Mary's, his wife, and his son, the second Rector, was 
undertaken early in the life of the Association and completed 
in 1 903, when an endowment of $4,000 was turned over to the 
Trustees. 



86 St. Maky's School Bulletin. 

(2) The Enlarging and Improving of the Chapel, around 
which the fondest recollections and deepest interest of the 
Alumnae center, was undertaken in 1904, and the enlarge- 
ment and adornment was completed in 1 905 at a cost of more 
than $3,500. 

(3) The Endowment of the Mary Iredell Scholarship and 
the Kate McKimmon Scholarship in St. Mary's, the present 
work of the Association, was undertaken at the 1907 Com- 
mencement, on the initiative of Miss Emilie W. McVea, a 
graduate of St. Mary's, and later Principal under the second 
Dr. Smedes, now Assistant Professor of English in the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati. The Alumnae propose to raise $6,000 
for this purpose in four years. Miss McVea is the Chairman 
of the Committee in Charge, and may be addressed by those 
interested at the University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, 0. 

The Alumnae are organized as far as possible into local 
Chapters in their several cities and towns, and these Chap- 
ters hold semi-annual meetings on November 1 st, Founders' 
Day, and May 1 2th, Alumnae Day, each year. 

There are upwards of 1 50 active members of the Raleigh 
Alumnae Chapter, and there are active Chapters in New York 
and Baltimore, as well as in many places nearer home. 



Gtfje ©toct&m g>rfjool ( for <§trls! ) of tfje Carolina* 



The 70th session of St. Mary's School begins September 
21, 1911. New pupils arrive September 19. 
Easter Term begins January 25, 1912. 



For Bulletins and other information, address, 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY, 
Rector. 



Jtlap, 1912 



g>eriejf I, &o. 23 



1 ilanj'H ^rlpol 



BULLETIN 




trustee* anfc jfacultp, 1911=12 

gfajarbs anb BiStinctionS, X9XX anb X 9X2 

enrollment, 19X142 
College Clarification, X9XX42 
Jfflusic Classification, X9XXX2 



Publialfpo (fuarterlg bg &L iHarn'a ^rljnol 

JXaleigfc, i5ort'o Carolina 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. C, as Second Class Matter 
Under Act op Congress of July 16, 1894 



RALEIGH, N. C. 
Founded in 1842 by Aldert Smedes, D.D. 



Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK. .Secretary and Business Manager 



Contents 

PAGE 

Calendar for 1912 4 

The Board of Trustees 5 

Faculty 6-7 

Officers 8 

Register of Students, 1911-12 9-15 

Commencement Awards, 1911 16-19 

Commencement Awards, 1912 20-23 

Academic Classification, 1911-12 23-25 

Class Promotions, May, 1912 26-27 

Classification in the Music Department, 1912 28-29 

Form of Bequest 31 



Calenbar for 1912=13 



1912 

September 16, Monday Faculty assemble at St. Mary's. 

September 17, Tuesday Registration and Classification of City | 

Pupils; New Boarding Pupils report by 
7 p. m. 

September 18, Wednesday Preliminary Examinations; Old Boarding 

Pupils report by 7 p. m. : Registration and 
Classification of Boarding Pupils. 

September 19, Thursday. Opening Service of Advent Term (First 

Half-year) at 9 a. m. 

November 1, Friday All Saints: Founders' Day. 

November 21, Thursday ._ Second Quarter begins. 

November 28 Thanksgiving Day. 

December 20 — Friday Christmas Recess begins at 3 p. m. 

1913 

January 7, Tuesday All pupils report by 7:30 p. m. 

January 23, Thursday Easter Term (Second Half-year) begins. 

February.., Ash Wednesday Lent begins. Holy Day. 

March 16, Palm Sunday ..Annual Visit of Bishop for Confirmation. 

March 20, Thursday Last Quarter begins. 

March 21, Good Friday Holy Day. 

May 12, Monday Alumnse Day: 71th Anniversary of the 

Founding of St. Mary's. 

May 25-27 Commencement Season. 

No absence from the school is allowed at or near Thanks- 
giving Day, Washington's Birthday, or from Palm Sunday 
to Easter inclusive. The only recess is at Christmas. 



GTfje Jloaro of Hvu*ttt$ 



Rt. Rev. Jos. Blount Cheshire, D.D., Chairman Raleigh, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Robt. Strange, D.D.. .Wilmington, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Wm. Alexander Gtterry Charleston, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner Asheville, N. C. 

Clerical anb Hap trustees! 

NORTH CAROLINA. 
Rev. M. A. Barber, Raleigh. Rev. J. E. Ingle, Henderson. 

Rev. Harris Mallinckrodt, Charlotte. Dr. R. H. Lewis, Raleigh. 
Col. Chas. E. Johnson, Raleigh. *Hon. R. H. Battle, Raleigh. 

Mr. W. A. Erwin, Durham. Mr. D. Y. Cooper, Henderson, 

(until 1915.) (until 1912.) 

EAST CAROLINA. 
Rev. R. B. Drane, D.D., Edenton. Rev. T. P. Noe, Wilmington. 

Mr. Frank Wood, Edenton. Mr. Geo. C. Rotall, Goldsboro. 

(until 1915.) (until 1912.) 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 
Rev. T. T. Walsh, Yorkville. Rev. L. G. Wood, Charleston. 

Mr. P. T. Hatne, Greenville. Mr. T. W. Bacot, Charleston, 

(until 1914.) (until 1914.) 

ASHEVILLE. 

Rev. W. H. Hardin, Gastonia. Rev. R. R. Swope, D.D., Biltmore. 

Hon. Wm. A. Hoke, Lincolnton. Mr. F. A. Clinard, Hickory, 

(until 1915.) (until 1912.) 

Cxecutibe Committee 

Rt. Rev. J. B. Cheshire, D.D., Chairman. 
Col. Chas. E. Johnson. Dr. R. H. Lewis. 

Hon. Wm. A. Hoke. Mr. W. A. Erwin. 

Mr. George C. Rotall. 

£i>ecretarp anb treasurer 

Dr. K. P. Battle, Jr. 
* Deceased. 



Stye faculty ano ®itiuv& of &t. Jttarp'g 

19X1=1912 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Secretary 

tEfje gJcabemie department 
Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Bible, Ethics, and Greek 

(A.B., Yale, 1882; B.D., General Theological Seminary, 1885; master 
in St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., 1888-1907. Rector of St. Mary's, 
1907—) 

ELEANOR W. THOMAS English and Literature 

(A.M., College for Women, S. C, 1900; summer student, Columbia 
University, N. Y., 1905; instructor, Greenville College, S. C, 1904. 
Instructor in St. Mary's, 1900-'04; 1905—) 

WILLIAM E. STONE History and German 

(A.B., Harvard, 1882; principal, Edenton, N. C, Academy, 1901-'02; 
master in Porter Academy, Charleston, 1902-'03. Instructor in St. 
Mary's, 1903—) 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Science 

(A.B., Washington College, Md., 1897; A.M., 1898; graduate student, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1900. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1903 — ) 

HELEN URQUHART Latin 

(A.B., Mount Holyoke, 1910. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1910—) 

MARGARET RICKS Mathematics 

(A.B., Converse College, 1907; A.M., Georgetown College (Ky.), 1911; 
student at Knoxville Summer School. Instructor, St. Mary's, 1911 — ) 

ELIZABETH P. SKINNER French 

(Graduate, St. Mary's, 1904; student, Columbia University Summer 
School; instructor, Raleigh High School, 1906-'10. Instructor, St. 
Mary's, 1911—) 

LOUISE A. WILSON English 

(A.B., Winthrop College (S. C), 1905; A.B., University of North Caro- 
lina, 1911. Instructor, St. Mary's, 1911—) 

FLORENCE C. DAVIS Elocution and Physical Culture 

(B.O., Emerson College, Boston, 1906; Elmira College; Posse Gym- 
nasium. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1911 — ) 

S. MARGUERITE LANE Domestic Science 

(Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Instructor in St. Mary's, 1911—.) 

KATE McKIMMON Primary School 

(Student and teacher at St. Mary's since 1861.) 

MARY SULLY HAYWARD Preparatory Work 

(A.B., Hollins, 1909; instructor in Powhatan Institute (Va.), 1909-'ll. 
Instructor in St. Mary's 1911 — .) 



iHusic department 
MARTHA A. DOWD, Director j ^^Music 

(Graduate of St. Mary's, 1S84; pupil of Kuersteiner, Sophus Wiig, Al- 
bert Mack. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1886—; Director of Music, 190S— ) 

R. BLINN OWEN In charge of Voice 

(M. Mus., Detroit School of Music; pupil of Zimmermann, Mazurette, 
Theo. Beach of Detroit; Kreutschmar, in New York; teacher in 
Detroit and New York; private teacher in Bluefield, W. Va., and 
Greensboro, N. C., 1906-'09. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1909—) 

BERTHA MAY LUNEY Organ, Piano 

(Pupil of Hyatt and Becker at Syracuse University; Foote, of Troy; and 
Tipton, of the Albany Cathedral. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1908—) 

BLANCHE L. CRAFTS Violin, Voice 

(B.Mus. , New England Conservatory, 1905; pupil of Felix Winternitz, 
Josef Adamowski; teacher, New England Conservatory j private 
teacher, Boston; teacher, Weslevan College (Ga.), Acadia Seminary 
(Canada), etc. Teacher, St. Mary's, 1911—) 

HERMINE R. SCHEPER Piano, Harmony 

(Graduate New England Conservatory; private student. New York 
City; teacher, Converse College, S. C. ; Hamilton Institute, Wash- 
ington; Elizabeth College, N. C. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1907—) 

CAROLINE N. DeROSSET Piano 

(Certificate in Piano, St. Mary's, 1906; Teachers' Certificate, Peabody 
Conservatory, Baltimore, 1910; teacher in Preparatory Depart- 
ment, Peabody Conservatory, 1910-'ll. Teacher, St. Mary's, 1911 — ) 

ELLA DORROH Piano 

(Certificate in Piano, St. Mary's, 1910; Diploma, 1911. Teacher, 1910—) 

girt department 

_„ T . Drawing, Painting, 

CLARA I. FENNER, Director De^ien etc 

(Graduate Maryland Institute, School of Art and Design; special student 
Pratt Institute, 1905; special student in Paris, 1907. Director of Art, 
St. Mary's, 1888-'96; 1902—) 

Clotutton Department 
FLORENCE C. DAVIS Director 

(B.O., Emerson College, Boston, 1906; Elmira College (N. Y.), Posse 
Gymnasium, Boston; private studio, Elmira; substitute teacher, 
Miss Metcalf s School, Tarrytown, 1908; teacher, Reidsville Semi- 
nary (N. C), 1909-'ll. Director of Elocution, St. Mary's, 1911—) 

SSiis'tncs'S Department 

Miss LIZZIE H. LEE, Director i Stenography, Typewriting, 

j Bookkeeping. 

(Director of the Department, 1896 — ) 

Miss JULIET B. SUTTON Assistant 

(Instructor in St. Mary's, 1898—) 



Officers;, 191142 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal 

Miss MARGUERITE LANE Housekeeper 

Miss LILLIAN PENNER Assistant Housekeeper 

Miss LOLA E. WALTON Matron of the Infirmary 

Dr. A. W. KNOX School Physician 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK, Secretary and Business Manager 

Miss LIZZIE H. LEE Bookkeeper 

Miss JULIET B. SUTTON Stenographer 

Mrs. MARY IREDELL Agent of the Trustees 



ftegtsiter of ^tubente, 1911=12 



Adams, Gussie Lavine Gary, N. G. 

Allen, Julia Washington Goldsboro, N. G. 

Alston, Marion Frances Texarkana, Texas. 

Alston, Ria Live Oak, Fla. 

Ashe, Wyndham Theodosia Trapier Raleigh, N. G. 

Bacot, Daisy .Raleigh, N. G. 

Badham, Louise Manning Edenton, N. G. 

Baker, Esther Amelia Raleigh, N. G. 

Baker, Elizabeth Whitely Raleigh, N. G. 

Baker, Katharine Boylan Raleigh, N. G. 

Ball, Gertrude Laura Raleigh, N. G. 

Ball, Laura Josephine Raleigh, N. G. 

Barbee, Adelyn Andrews Raleigh, N. G. 

Barber, Lena Connie Goldston, N. C. 

Bass, Bessie White Raleigh, N. G. 

Bee, Elizabeth Laidler James Island, 8. G. 

Bernard, Louise White Raleigh, N. G. 

Bernhardt, Lily Heilig Salisbury, N. G. 

Blakely, Marguerite Griffin, Ga. 

Bond, Annie Lloyd Tallahassee, Fla. 

Bottum, Frances Ranney Asheville, N. C. 

Bottum, Margaret Huntingdon Asheville, N. G. 

Bouknight, Emma Bettis Johnston, 8. C. 

Bowen, Annie Goulder West Raleigh, N. G. 

Bowen, Eunice Woodward West Raleigh, N. G. 

Bowen, Isabelle Worth West Raleigh, N. G. 

Bowen, Mary Elizabeth West Raleigh, N. G. 

Boylston, Adelaide Boylan Snow Raleigh, N. G. 

Briggs, Mildred Winston Raleigh, N. G. 

Brigham, Gertrude Louise Savannah, Ga. 

Broadfoot, Margaret Strange Fayetteville, N. C. 

Brown, Elsie Marguerite Boston, Mass. 

Brown, Mary Elizabeth Raleigh, N. G. 

Browne, Cicely Raleigh, N. G. 

Bruce, Jeanette Harvie Portsmouth, Ya* 

Bruffey, Mildred Lewis Rocky Mount, N. G. 

2 



10 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Budge, Dorothy Miami, Fla. 

Burfoot, Ada Aydlett Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Busbee, Susannah Steele Raleigh, N. C. 

Butler, Mary Brown Henderson, N. C. 

Cain, Mary M Raleigh, N. C. 

Cameron, Isabella Mayo Raleigh, N .C. 

Cameron, Sallie Taliaferro Raleigh, N. C. 

Cherry, Elizabeth Melton Raleigh, N. C. 

Clark, Laura Placidia Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Cleaton, Carrie Portsmouth, Va. 

Conger, Mary Louise Edenton, N. C. 

Cooper, Fannie Spottswood Henderson, N. C. 

Cooper, Julia Horner Oxford, N. C. 

Cooper, Sophronia Moore Oxford, N. C. 

Crews, Grace Kearney Raleigh, N. C. 

Cross, Elizabeth Raleigh, N. C. 

Curtice, Marie Justin Raleigh, N. C. 

Curtice, Kolb Raleigh, N. C. 

Dehon, Julia Middleton Spartanburg, S. C. 

deRosset, Tallulah Ellen Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DeVisconti, Sue May Farmville, N. C. 

Dortch, Elizabeth Raleigh, N. C. 

Dortch, Lucy Bayard Raleigh, N. C. 

Douglas, Ruth Preston, Md. 

DuBose, Beverly Means Columbia, S. C. 

Edwards, Thomasine Fergusson's Wharf, Va. 

Elias, Miguel Raleigh, N. C. 

Erwin, Margaret Locke West Durham, N. C. 

Pagan, Annie Eliza Edenton, N. C. 

Fenner, Sarah Baker Raleigh, N. C. 

Ferebee, Katie Attmore Aurora, N. C. 

Fitchett, Frances Elizabeth Cape Charles, Va. 

Folk, Elizabeth McMorine Raleigh, N. C. 

Fuller, Georgie Bond Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Gallup, Penelope Morrisette New York City, N. Y. 

Gaylord, Gretchen Elizabeth Bath, N. C. 

Giersch, Alice May Raleigh, N. C. 

Gilbert, Fredrika Mary LoZo, Montana. 

Graves, Mary Franklin Mt. Airy, N. C. 



ST. MARTS SCHOOL BULLETIN. 11 

Green, Bessie Cain Adrian, Ga. 

Gregg, Virginia Louise Florence, S. C. 

Griswold, Mary Bryan Durham, N. C. 

Harris, Alice Gibson Franklinton, N. C. 

Harris, Olive Rebecca Reidsville, N. C. 

Harrison, Florence Leftwicb Raleigh, N. C. 

Hartridge, Helen Sandwich Jacksonville, Fla. 

Hassell, James L. . . Edenton, N. C. 

Hendricks, Nellie Marshall, N. C. 

Herbert, Leone Kathleen Morehead City, N. C. 

Hey ward, Sarah Kirk Beaufort, S. C. 

Hill, Randolph I West Raleigh, N. C. 

Hoke, Mary McBee Raleigh, N. C. 

Holding, Mildred Moore Raleigh, N. C. 

Holton, Mary Eugenia Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Hopkins, Dorothy Nottingham Onancock, Va. 

Hoppe, Laura Margaret Marietta, Ga. 

Hughes, Elizabeth Raleigh, N. C. 

Hughes. Martha Elizabeth Raleigh, N. C. 

Hughes, Katharine Dorothy Raleigh, N. C. 

Hunt, Janie Outlaw Oxford, N. C. 

Jerman, Julia Borden Raleigh, N. C. 

Johnson, Ellen Armistead Knoxville, Tenn. 

Jones, Caroline Clarke Charlotte, N. C. 

Jones, Plorie Louise Raleigh, N. C. 

Jones, Flossie May Raleigh, N. C. 

Jordan, Margaret Calvert Portsmouth, Va. 

Josey, Mattie Herring Scotland Neck, N. C. 

King, Ella Tucker Jacksonville, Fla. 

King, Margie Menchen Raleigh, N. C. 

King, Myrtle Raleigh, N. C. 

Kitchin, Sue Arrington Raleigh, N. C. 

Knox, Emilie Rose Raleigh, N. C. 

Kyle, Rebecca Devereux Norfolk, Va. 

Lacy, Alice Loretta Raleigh, N. C. 

Lamb, Mary Hilliard Henderson, N. C. 

Larner, Harriette Tampa, Fla. 

Lasater, Hattie May Raleigh, N. C. 

Lassiter, Kathryn Blount Hertford, N. C. 



12 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Lassiter, Katherine Leigh Oxford 

Lay, Anna Rogers Raleigh 

Lay, Elizabeth Atkinson Raleigh 

Lay, Ellen Booth Raleigh 

Lay, Lucy Fitzhugh Raleigh 

Leach, Eliza Thompson Raleigh 

Leak, Erne Shepherd Wadesboro 

Leak, Katharine Mary Wadesboro 

Leard, Margaret Agnes Raleigh 

Lebby, Lucile Bee Charleston 

Lee, Lizzie Hinton Raleigh 

Lee, Ruth Addison Raleigh 

Lilly, Frances Hinsdale Fayetteville 

Linehan, Marie Dorothea Raleigh 

Linehan, Susan Eugene Raleigh 

Lockhart, Caroline Ashe Wadesboro 

Magee, Mattille Irwin Wake Forest 

Mann, Eleanor Vass Raleigh 

Marriott, Emily Battleboro 

Martin, Lucinda Gallaway Leaksville 

Maxwell, Evelyn Cameron Pensacola 

Miller, Fannie Butler Trenton 

Miller, Henry Grady Raleigh, 

Morgan, Mary Strange Raleigh 



Morris, Mary Elizabeth Belief onte, Pa. 

Moses, Kathleen Fort Caswell, N. C. 

McCullers, Melba Clayton, N. C. 

McDonald, Flora Raleigh, N. C. 

McGary, Margaret Elmer Durham, N. C. 

McGehee, Mary Polk Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Mclver, Susie Cheraw, S. C. 

McKenzie, Alice Lorraine Salisbury, N. C. 

McKenzie, Elizabeth Keeling Salisbury, N. C. 

McMullan, Fannie Old Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Newsom, Margaret Raleigh, N. C. 

Nicolson, Elizabeth Quarles Salisbury, N. C. 

Nix, Claudia Catherine Orangeburg, S. C. 

Northrop, Florie Wright Wilmington, N. C. 

Nottingham, Mildred Inez Chesapeake, Ya. 



N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
S.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 
Fla. 
S.C. 
N.C. 
N.C. 



ST. MARTS SCHOOL BULLETIN. 13 

Owen, Mary Hancock Guatemala, C. A. 

Palmer, Eliza Whitfield Gulf, N. C. 

Park, Prances Caroline West Raleigh, N. C. 

Patterson, Helen Elaine Wilson, N. C. 

Peace, Bessie Fitzhugh Watha, N. C. 

Pender, Katharine Marriott Tarooro, N. C. 

Peoples, Helen Read Kedts, Va. 

Pickel, Marion C Raleigh, N. C. 

Pinnix, Frances Graves Reidsville, N. C. 

Pugh, Lois Savannah, Ga. 

Purvis, Mildred Ward Rooersonville, N. C. 

Quinerly, Sallie Bett Ay den, N. C. 

Rawlings, Susan Porter Wilson, N. C. 

Rees, Julia Mayrant Charleston, S. C. 

Reese, Agnes Savannah, Ga. 

Reynolds, Maude Edwin Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Robbins, Roella Raleigh, N. C. 

Rogers, Winifred Richards Jacksonville, Fla. 

Rosser, Ruth Atlanta, Ga. 

Rowe, Julia Staton Tarhoro, N. C. 

Royster, Virginia Page Raleigh, N. C. 

Sasser, Bessie Lorenzo Bowden, N. C. 

Savage, Sallie Custis Cape Charles, Va. 

Schwartz, Henrietta Raleigh, N. C. 

Sears, Evelyn Davis Raleigh, N. C. 

Sears, Frances McKee Raleigh, N. C. 

Sharp, Josephine Carroll Belhaven,N. C. 

Shepherd, Lilias McDaniel Raleigh, N. C. 

Shields, Anne Dupree Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Shields, P. E Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Shull, Zona May Missoula, Montana. 

Silver, Kate Hale Raleigh, N. C. 

Sizer, Hattie Elizabeth Bath, N. C. 

Smith, Elizabeth Maund Wilmington, N. C. 

Smith, Josephine Valentine Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Smith, Kate Watson Selma, Ala. 

Smith, Leah Marion Raleigh, N. C. 

Smith, Mary Clark Charlotte, N. C. 

Smith, Olive Ernestine Washington, D. C. 



14 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Smith, Annie Olivia Raleigh, N. C. 

Smith, Patsey Harry Raleigh, N. C. 

Smith, Ruth Walker Macon, Ga. 

Stephenson, Mary Belle Raleigh, N. C. 

Stevens, Lillie Mae Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Stiles, Elise Gordon Malbone, Ga. 

Stone, Florence Douglas Raleigh, N. C. 

Stovall, Pleasant Alexander Savannah, Ga. 

Sturgeon, Amelia Pinkney - Apex, N. C. 

Strong, Anna Cowan Raleigh, N. C. 

Strong, Prances Lambert Raleigh, N. C. 

Swann, Ethel B Jasper, Texas. 

Tarry, Elizabeth Anderson Wooclworth, N. C. 

Taylor, Mary Anna Oxford, N. C. 

Telfair, Elizabeth Alexander Raleigh, N. C. 

Thompson, Elizabeth Warren Raleigh, N. C. 

Timberlake, Agnes Cotten Raleigh, N. C. 

Tonnoffski, Josephine Pearl Raleigh, N. C, 

Trenholm, Katherine Waties Jacksonville, Fla. 

Tucker, Earle Elizabeth Grifton, N. C. 

Turpin, Anne Page Macon, Ga. 

Tyson, Mary Glenn Carthage, N. C. 

Walker, Elizabeth LeGrand Raleigh, N. C. 

Walker, Frances Warner Edenton, N. C. 

Warren, Myrtle Greenville, N. C. 

Webb, Adriana Relay Houston, Va. 

Webb, Ovid Kinsolving Houston, Va. 

White, Bessie Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Wilkinson, Rosalie Charlotte, N. C. 

Williams, Elinor Forniss Fort Hamilton, N. Y. 

Williams, Maria Julia Ringivood, N. C. 

Williams, Sadie Augusta, Ga. 

Williams, Willie Simpson Ring wood, N. C. 

Williamson, Mary Bonner Graham, N. C. 

Williford, Josephine Elizabeth Raleigh, N. C. 

Williford, Mildred Raleigh, N. C. 

Willis, Willie Williamson Waynesville, N. C. 

Willson, Annie Herndon Raleigh, N. C. 

Windham, Virginia Martin Mulberry, Fla. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 15 

Winstead, Martha Gold Mullins, S. C. 

Winston, Amabel Conyers Raleigh, N. C. 

Wood, Clara Brunsioiclc, Ga. 

Wood, Nellie Robbins Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Woodruff, Jennie Elizabeth Summerville, S. C. 

Woollcott, Elizabeth Brydon Raleigh, N. C. 

Wright, Bessie Union Springs, Ala. 

Wright, Helen Cherry Boardman, N. C. 

Wright, Martha Boardman Boardman, N. C. 

Wynne, Annie Lee Raleigh, N. C. 

Total enrollment 242 

House students 152 

Local students 90 



16 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 



tEfje Commencement &ftmrb£ of 19U 



Cfje <§ratmates 

The College Class of 1911. 

Ina Hoskins Jones Raleigh, N. C. 

Nell Battle Lewis Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Rebecca Merritt (First Honor) Raleigh, N. C. 

Lula Everett Parker West Raleigh, N. C. 

Isabel Hester Perry Henderson, N. C. 

Josepbine Pearl Tonnoffski (Second Honor) . .Raleigh, N. C. 

©tploma in ipano 

Ella Dorrob Greenville, S. C. 

Certificates 

Academic Certificates. 

Rutb Reynolds Critz Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Bessie Smedes Erwin Durham, N. C. 

Agnes Tinsley Harrison Atlanta, Ga. 

Helen Elizabeth McArtbur Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Rebecca Benneban Wood Edenton, N. C. 

Certificates in the Music Department. 

In Piano. 

Julia Borden Goldsboro, N. C. 

Mary Mitcbell Chamberlain West Raleigh, N. C. 

Amelia Pinkney Sturgeon Gary, N. C. 

In Voice. 
Zona May Sbull Missoula, Montana. 

Certificates in the Art Department. 

Nell Battle Lewis Raleigh, N. C. 

Rebecca Benneban Wood Edenton, N. C. 



ST. MARTS SCHOOL BULLETIN. 17 

Certificate in the Elocution Department. 
Agnes Tinsley Harrison Atlanta, Ga. 

Certificates in the Business Department. 

Full Certificate. 

Bessie Blount Winslow Hertford, N. C. 

In Stenography and Typewriting. 

Nina Farrow Gibbs Oriental, N. C. 

Laura Washington Griffith Charlotte, N. C. 

Louise Sanders Raleigh, N. C. 

Marjorie Terrell Raleigh, N. C. 

In Bookkeeping. 
Margaret Quince Wilmington, N. C. 

ftfje Honor &otI 

The highest general award of merit, open to all members 
of the School, is the Honor Roll, announced at Commence- 
ment. The requirements are: 

(1) The pupil must have been in attendance the entire 
session and have been absent from no duty at any time 
during the session without the full consent of the Rector, 
and without lawful excuse. 

(2) She must have had during the year a full regular 
course of study or its equivalent, and must have carried 
this work to successful completion, taking all required ex- 
aminations. 

(3) She must have maintained an average of "Very 
Good" (90 per cent), or better, in her studies. 

(4) She must have made a record of "Excellent" (less 
than two demerits) in Deportment, in Industry, and in 
Punctuality. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory 
bearing in the affairs of her school life during the year. 



18 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

The Honor Roll for 1910-11: 

In the Lowek Preparatory Department. 

Elizabeth McMorin Folk 
In the Upper Preparatory Department. 
Yvonne Marie Baber 

In the College. 
Mary Brown Butler 
Hortense Haughton Jones 
Mary Rebecca Merritt 
Josephine Valentine Smith 
Patsey Harry Smith 
Josephine Pearl Tonnoffski 
Myrtle Warren 
Rebecca Bennehan Wood 



Cfje ^Primary department gtoarbs 

Roll of Honor. 
Virginia Page Royster 

The following passed all examinations, but owing to con- 
tinued absence were not eligible to the Roll of Honor: 
Mary Hoke 
Elizabeth W. Baker 

To Be Commended. 
For good work in the studies of the Department: 
Florence Leftwich Harrison 
Elizabeth Murray Cross 

For regular attendance: 

Virginia Royster (absent one day in 1910 

and 1911) 
Anna Rogers Lay 
Lucy Fitzhugh Lay 

For deportment (average 100) : 
Elizabeth M. Cross 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 19 

Special $rt?es( 

Cte JStSfjop barker JSotanp $ri?e 
The Bishop Parker Botany Prize, given by Rt. Rev. Ed- 
ward M. Parker, Bishop Coadjutor of New Hampshire, is 
awarded to that pupil who in accordance with certain pub- 
lished conditions does the best work in the preparation of 
an herbarium. 

The prize for 1911 was awarded to 
Myktle Warrex, of the Class of 1913, of Greenville, N. C. 

W$t Mlt* Jflebal 

The highest award for the work of the session as deter- 
mined by a comparison of general averages is the Niles 
Medal. 

The Niles Medal for General Excellence was instituted in 
1906 by the Reverend Charles Martin Niles, D.D. It is 
awarded to the pupil who has made the best record in 
scholarship and deportment during the session, subject to 
the following conditions: 

The requirements" for eligibility are: 

(1) The pupil must have taken throughout the year at 
least 15 points of regular work; and have satisfactorily 
completed this work, passing all required examinations. 

(2) The pupil must have been Excellent in Deportment. 

(3) The pupil must have taken all regular general courses 
assigned and done satisfactory work in them. 

(4) The pupil must be a regular student of the College 
Department. The medal is awarded to the same pupil only 
once. 

The medal was awarded in 1911 to 
Patsey Harry Smith, of Raleigh, N. C, of the Class of 
1912, whose average for the year was 95.39 per cent. 



20 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 



Cfje Commencement gtamr&g of 1912 
Wt)t (^ratiuatES 

The College Class of 1912. 

Frances Ranney Bottum Asheville, N. C. 

Margaret Strange Broadfoot. Fayetteville, N. C. 

Elizabeth Hughes Raleigh, N. C. 

Nellie Hendricks Marshall, N. C. 

Caroline Ashe Lockhart (Second Honor) . .Wadesboro, N. C. 

Fannie Old McMullan Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Patsey Harry Smith (First Honor) Raleigh, N. C. 

Anna Cowan Strong Raleigh, N. C. 

©tploma ttt "^Totce 

Zona May Shull Missoula, Mont. 

Certificates 

Certificates in the Music Department. 

Regular Certificates — In Piano. 
Sarah Baker Fenner Raleigh, N. C. 

In Violin. 
Emilie Rose Knox Raleigh, N. C. 

In Organ. 
Susan Porter Rawlings Wilson, N. C. 

Teachers' Certificates — In Piano. 

Zona May Shull Missoula, Mont. 

Amelia Pinkney Sturgeon Gary, N. C. 

Certificate in the Art Department. 
Patsey Harry Smith Raleigh, N. C. 



ST. MARTS SCHOOL BULLETIN. 21 

Certificates in the Business Department. 
Full Certificates. 

Elsie Marguerite Brown Boston, Mass. 

Georgie Bond Puller Fort Leavenworth, Kan. 

In Stenography and Typeivriting. 

Margie Menchen King Raleigh, N. C. 

Myrtle King Raleigh, N. C. 

Bessie Fitzhugh Peace Watha, N. C. 

Josephine Pearl Tonnoffski Raleigh, N. C. 

Annie Herndon Willson Raleigh, N. C. 

In Bookkeeping. 

Marie Justis Curtice Raleigh, N. C. 

Martha Gold Winstead Mullins, S. C. 

Cfje Honor Boll of 19X14912 

(See page 17.) 

Mary Brown Butler, '13 

Ruth Smith, '15 

Patsey Harry Smith, '12 

Myrtle Warren, '14 

Julia Washington Allen, '15 

Josephine Valentine Smith, '14 

Susannah Steele Busbee, '13 

Elinor Furniss Williams (Prep.) 

Alice Loretta Lacy, '13 

Helen Read Peoples, '15 

Laura Placidia Clark, '15 

Lucinda Gallaway Martin, '15 

Ellen Armistead Johnson, '15 

Alice Gibson Harris, '15 

Elise Gordon Stiles 

Frances Lambert Strong, '15 



Bessie McMorine Folk (Sub-prep.) 



22 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 



QLfyz iprimarp department gtoarbg 

The following pupils, having passed satisfactory examina- 
tions in the Third Year of the Primary Department, were 
promoted to the Sub-Preparatory Department: 

Elizabeth Murray Cross 

Florence Leftwich Harrison 

Anna Rogers Lay 

Lucy Fitzhugh Lay 

Susan Linehan 

Lillias McDaniel Shepherd 

Virginia Royster 

The following pupils are to be commended: 
For good work in the First Year: 
Adelaide Snow Boylston 
Mary Strange Morgan 

For excellent work in the Third Year: 
Mary McBee Hoke 
Florence Leftwich Harrison 

For attendance (no absence during 1911-12): 
Lillias McDaniel Shepherd 

For industry and unfailing courtesy in deportment: 
Elizabeth Murray Cross 

Roll of Honor. 

Elizabeth Whitely Baker (96.4) 
Elizabeth Woollcott (94) 
Randolph Isabel Hill (92.7) 
Virginia Page Royster (91.6) 
Sallie Taliaferro Cameron (91.4) 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 23 

Special -prices 

SCtie J3iafcop barker JBotanp $ri?t 
(See page 19.) 

The prize for 1912 was awarded to 

Elizabeth Atkinson Lay, of the Class of 1915, of Ra- 
leigh, N. C. 

(Efte i^tles jWebal 
(See page 19.) 

The medal for 1912 was awarded to 

Mary Brown Butler, of Henderson, N. C, of the Class 
of 1913, whose average was 96.40 per cent. 

gcabemic Classification— W$t College 

€aster &erm 19X1 = 12 

In order to be entitled to classification in a College class, 
the student must (1) have been admitted in the five re- 
quired subjects into the College; (2) have earned the mini- 
mum points required for admission to the class; and (3) be 
taking a sufficient amount of work to earn the number of 
points required for admission to the next higher class at the 
end of the session. 

The number following each name indicates the number 
of points credited to the student; the number in parenthesis 
indicates the number of points she had at the end of the 
session if she completed successfully the work assigned. 

Seniors (42 points). 

Frances Ranney Bottum 48 (60) 

Margaret Strange Broadfoot 50 (62) 

Nellie Hendricks 49 (61) 

Elizabeth Hughes 50 (60) 

Caroline Ashe Lockhart 47 (60) 

Fannie Old McMullan 46 (60) 

Patsey Harry Smith 51 (60) 

Anna Cowan Strong 46 (60) 



24 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Junioks (30 points). 

Susannah Steele Busbee 32 

Mary Brown Butler 31 

Caroline Clarke Jones 36 

Alice Loretta Lacy 32 

Margaret Agnes Leard 32 

Evelyn Croom Maxwell 32 

Mary Hancock Owen 37 

Sophomores (15 points). 

Elizabeth Melton Cherry 19 

Sophronia Moore Cooper 16 

Lucy Bayard Dortch 24 

Margaret Locke Erwin 22 

Sarah Baker Fenner 17 

Sara Kirk Hey ward 14 

Laura Margaret Hoppe 20 

Kathryn Baird Lassiter 20 

Lizzie Hinton Lee, 2d 16 

Ruth Addison Lee 19 

Melba McCullers 19 

Susan Porter Rawlings 28 

Kate Hale Silver 17 

Josephine Valentine Smith 18 

Mary Glenn Tyson 20 

Myrtle Warren 18 

Bessie Peele White 23 

Amabel Conyers Winston 21 

Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff 27 

Freshmen. 

Julia Washington Allen 2 

Louise Manning Badham 

Margaret Huntingdon Bottum 8 

Emma Bettis Bouknight 11 

Laura Placidia Clark 3 

Fannie Spottswood Cooper 2 

Julia Horner Cooper 15 

Grace Kearney Crews 12 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 25 

Sue May DeVisconti 2 (22) 

Ruth Douglas (19) 

Beverly Means DuBose 16 (27) 

Frances Fitchett 8 (20) 

Mary Franklin Graves 2 (15) 

Mary Bryan Griswold 1 ( 15 ) 

Alice Gibson Harris ( 19 ) 

Mildred Moore Holding 2 (17) 

Ellen Armistead Johnson 7 (32) 

Rebecca Devereux Kyle 7 (27) 

Harriette Lamer 1 ( 17 ) 

Sue Arrington Kitchin 8 (16) 

Elizabeth Atkinson Lay 2 (16) 

Katharine Mary Leak 2 (16) 

Frances Hinsdale Lilly (16) 

Matille Irwin Magee ( 15 ) 

Emily Marriott 18 (25) 

Lucinda Galloway Martin 2 (18) 

Susie Mclver 15 (29) 

Elizabeth Keeling McKenzie (15) 

Elizabeth Quarles Nicolson 3 (30) 

Helen Read Peoples 4 ( 17 ) 

Agnes Reese 11 ( 22 ) 

Maude Edwin Reynolds (17) 

Julia Staton Rowe 2 (15) 

Sallie Custis Savage 1 (15) 

Henrietta Schwartz 6 ( 15 ) 

Nannie Dupree Shields 7 (17) 

Kate Watson Smith 14 (19) 

Mary Clark Smith (16) 

Ruth Walker Smith (18) 

Mary Belle Stephenson (15) 

Florence Douglas Stone 2 (17) 

Frances Lambert Strong 4 (17) 

Elizabeth Anderson Tarry 6 (17) 

Katherine Waties Trenholm 4 (15) 

Anne Page Turpin 1 (18) 

Frances Warner Walker 1 ( 25 ) 

Virginia Martin Windham 5 ( 19 ) 

Nellie Robbins Wood 2 (20) 



26 -ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Clafig ^Promotions; tn tfje College 

Jfor ti)e Session of 1912=13 
To be Seniors. 

Susannah Steele Busbee (45) 

Mary Brown Butler (46) 

Caroline Clarke Jones (43) 

Alice Loretta Lacy ( 42 ) 

Margaret Agnes Leard ( 47 ) 

Evelyn Croom Maxwell ( 45 ) 

Mary Hancock Owen (46) 

Bessie Peele White (43) 

Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff (42) 

To be Juniors. 

Margaret Huntingdon Bottum (30) 

Elizabeth Melton Cherry (31) 

Laura Placidia Clark ( 32 ) 

Sophronia Moore Cooper (30) 

Sarah Baker Penner (30) 

Sallie Kirk Heyward (34) 

Laura Margaret Hoppe (31) 

Ellen Armistead Johnson (31) 

Rebecca Devereux Kyle (30) 

Kathryn Blount Lassiter (34) 

Melba McCullers (35) 

Elizabeth Quarles Nicolson (30) 

Susan Porter Rawlings (37) 

Kate Hale Silver ' (32) 

Josephine Valentine Smith ; . . . . (32) 

Myrtle Warren (30) 

Amabel Conyers Winston ( 39 ) 

To be Sophomores. 

Julia Washington Allen (28) 

Emma Bettis Bouknight (27) 

Fannie Spottswood Cooper (19) 

Julia Horner Cooper (29) 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 27 

Grace Kearney Crews (25) 

Ruth Douglas (19) 

Mary Franklin Graves (15) 

Alice Gibson Harris ( 19 ) 

Sue Arrington Kitchin (15) 

Elizabeth Atkinson Lay (16) 

Mattille Irwin Magee ( 15 ) 

Lucinda Gallaway Martin (15) 

Helen Read Peoples ( 17 ) 

Agnes Reese (18) 

Julia Staton Rowe (15) 

Kate Watson Smith ( 19 ) 

Mary Clark Smith (27) 

Ruth Walker Smith (18) 

Florence Douglas Stone (17) 

Frances Lambert Strong ( 17 ) 

Elizabeth Anderson Tarry (25) 

Anne Page Turpin (15)_ 

Frances Warner Walker (19) 

Virginia Windham (19) 

Nellie Robbins Wood (23) 

To be Freshmen. 

Marion Alston ( 6 ) 

Dorothy Nottingham Hopkins (9) 

Margaret Calvert Jordan (0) 

Eliza Whitfield Palmer (8) 

Lois Pugh (6) 

Sallie Bett Quinerly (9) 

Ruth Rosser ( ) 

Rosalie Wilkinson (10) 

Elinor Furniss Williams (0) 

Helen Cherry Wright (6) 



28 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Clarification in tfje jWuaic department 

akebteeU to Map, 1912 

To be a Freshman the pupil must have completed Theory 
I and Course I in Technique. 

To be a Sophomore she must have completed Theory II 
and Course II in Technique. 

To be a Junior she must have completed Theory III and 
Course III in Technique. 

To be a Senior she must have completed Harmony I and 
Course IV in Technique. 

To get the Certificate she must have completed Harmony 
II, Music History, Course V in Technique, have given a 
public recital, and have completed the required amount of 
academic work. 

To get the Diploma she must have done at least a year 
of advanced study after getting the Certificate and have 
given a Diploma recital. 

Diploma. 
Zona May Shull Voice 

Certificates. 

Sarah Baker Penner Piano 

Emilie Rose Knox Violin 

Susan Porter Rawlings Organ 

Teacher's Certificate. 

Zona May Shull Piano 

Amelia Pinkney Sturgeon Piano 

Seniors. 

Ada Aydlett Burf oot Piano 

Lina Ashe Lockhart Piano 

Henrietta Schwartz Piano 

Juniors. 

Emma Bettis Bouknight Piano 

Leone Kathleen Herbert Piano 

Sallie Kirk Hey ward Piano 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 29 

Anne Dupree Shields Organ 

Josephine Valentine Smith Piano 

Elizabeth Anderson Tarry Piano 

Lucy Bayard Dortch Voice 

Mary Clark Smith Piano 

Sophomores. 

Adelyn Andrews Barbee Piano 

Margaret Strange Broadfoot Piano 

Predrike Mary Gilbert Voice 

Alice Gibson Harris Piano 

Ruth Addison Lee Piano 

Lucinda Gallaway Martin Piano 

Eleanor Vass Mann Piano 

Fannie Butler Miller Piano 

Flora McDonald Piano 

Kate Watson Smith Voice 

Amabel Conyers Winston Voice 

Helen Cherry Wright Piano 

Martha Boardman Wright Piano 

Ruth Douglas Piano 

Freshmen. 

Marguerite Blakely Voice 

Dorothy Budge Violin 

Sarah Baker Fenner Violin 

Mary Franklin Graves Piano 

Lucile Bee Lebby Piano 

Mary Polk McGehee Piano 

Susie Mclver Piano 

Alice McKenzie Piano 

Agnes Reese Violin 

Olive Ernestine Smith Piano 

Lillie Mae Stevens Organ 

Mary Bonner Williamson Piano 

Elinor Furnis Williams Piano 



Jform of Request 

"I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of St. 
Mary's School, Raleigh, JSTorth Carolina, their suc- 
cessors and assigns, absolutely and forever (the prop- 
erty given), , in trust that it 

shall be used for the benefit of said School, in the dis- 
cretion of said Trustees, for building, improvement, 
equipment, or otherwise" 

"in trust to be invested and the income derived there- 
from to be used for the benefit of said School in such 
manner and for such purposes as to the Trustees may 
seem best." 



Gftje Btocesian ikfjool (for <§trte) of tfje Carolina^ 



The 71st session of St. Mary's School begins Sep- 
tember 19, 1912. 

Easter Term begins January 23, 1913.. 



For Bulletins and other information, address 
Rev. GEORGE W. LAY, 

Rector. 



June, 1912 Series I, J2o. 24 

&t. ilanj'0 j^djool 

BULLETIN 




Report of 
Cfje £>t. Jfflarp's Conference 

of tije 

Clergp anb Hapmen of tfie CfmrcJ) 



JPublialjfb (fuarierlg bg &t. Mary's ^rfaol 

iRaleifff).. Jlortfj Carolina 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. C, as Second Class Matter- 
Under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



&t Jflarp'g g>ri)ool 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Founded in 1842 by Aldert Smedes, D.D. 



Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK. .Secretary and Business Manager 



Contents! 

Page. 

General Statement about the Conferences 5 

The Third Conference 6 

The Program 7-8 

Those in Attendance 9-10 

Mr. Caley's Addresses in detail 11-18 

Bishop Kinsman's Lectures in detail 18-21 

The Informal Conferences 21 

The Closing Service 22-23 

Resolutions 24 

The Previous Conferences 25-26 

Memorial on the Rev. McNeely DuBose 27 



Cfje Jloaro of Erustees 



tEfte bishops 

Rt. Ret. Jos. Blount Cheshire, D.D., Chairman Raleigh, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Robt. Strange, D.D Wilmington, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Wm. Alexander Guerry Charleston, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner Asheville, N. C. 

Clerical anb Hap lErvuitttsi 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Rev. M. A. Barber, Raleigh. Rev. J. E. Ingle, Henderson. 

Rev. Harris Mallinckrodt, Charlotte. Dr. R. H. Lewis, Raleigh. 
Col. Chas. E. Johnson, Raleigh. *Hon. R. H. Battle, Raleigh. 

Mr. W. A. Erwin, Durham. Mr. D. Y. Cooper, Henderson, 

(until 1915.) (until 1918.) 

EAST CAROLINA. 
Rev. R. B. Drane, D.D., Edenton. Rev. T. P. Noe, Wilmington. 

Mr. Frank Wood, Edenton. Mr. Geo. C. Rotall, Goldsboro. 

(until 1915.) (until 1918.) 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 
Rev. T. T. Walsh, Yorkville. Rev. L. G. Wood, Charleston. 

Mr. P. T. Hatne, Greenville. Mr. T. W. Bacot, Charleston, 

(until 1914.) (until 1914.) 

ASHEVILLE. 

Rev. W. R. Dye, Lincolnton. Rev. Jno. W. Areson, Tryon. 

Hon. Wm. A. Hoke, Lincolnton. Mr. F. A. Clinard, Hickory. 

(until 1915.) (until 1914.) 

Cxecutibe Committee 

Rt. Rev. J. B. Cheshire, D.D., Chairman. 
Col. Chas. E. Johnson. Dr. R. H. Lewis. 

Hon. Wm. A. Hoke. Mr. W. A. Erwin. 

Mr. George C. Royall. Mr. D. Y. Cooper. 

£S>eeretarp anb ^Treasurer 

Dr. K. P. Battle, Jr. 
* Deceased. 



THE ST. MARY'S CONFERENCE 

OF THE 

CLERGY AND LAYMEN OF THE CAROLINAS 

In recent years there has become more and more 
evident the necessity for people engaged in any kind 
of ethical or altruistic work to meet together from 
time to time to take common counsel about the con- 
ditions of their work, to plan for its development 
and to encourage one another with work accomplished 
and with ideals to be realized. The average Church 
Convention, with its routine business and many 
social demands gives little time for serious thought 
over the larger problems of the day. 

Realizing this fact and with a view of bringing 
the Churchmen of the Carolinas together to think 
over matters of great and common interest in a 
serious and thoughtful manner the Rector of St. 
Mary's School, by authority of the Board of Trus- 
tees, sent out invitations in May, 1910, to many rep- 
resentative Churchmen of North and South Carolina 
to come to St. Mary's as guests of the School for sev- 
eral days in June of that year. This first St. Mary's 
Conference was, in the opinion of those present, so 
thoroughly helpful and stimulating that at their 
earnest request a second Conference was held in 
June, 1911, and a third Conference this June, from 
the third to the eighth inclusive, with an attendance 
this year, all told, of thirty-one clergymen and four- 
teen laymen. 

One of the speakers who has had large experience 



6 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

said that, while there were other similar meetings 
with a large attendance of men and women, he knew 
of few Church Conferences in the whole country at- 
tended by as large a number of men. 

Many of those invited expressed great regret at 
their inability to attend and their deep appreciation 
of the privileges they would miss, while the uni- 
versal testimony of those present, expressed in pri- 
vate conversation and in personal letters received 
after the Conference, leads us to believe that these 
meetings gave pleasure and profit to all and that 
there is a general wish that they be a permanent an- 
nual feature in our Church life. 

tEtye ^fjtro Conference J^elo HTune tfjirb to eigfjtf), 1912 

Qtfje speakers! 

The special speakers for the Third Conference 
were the Rt. Rev. Frederick J. Kinsman, D.D., 
Bishop of Delaware, and the Rev. Llewellyn K". 
Caley, Rector of the Church of St. Jude and the 
Nativity, Philadelphia, and Secretary of the Sunday 
School Union. 

Bishop Kinsman was one of the special speakers 
at the First Conference, and his presence and lec- 
tures had a great part in its success, so that his re- 
turn was looked forward to with much pleasure. At 
the First Conference he delivered the lectures which 
have since been published on The Principles of 
Anglicanism, and his lectures this year on Phases 
of Modern Anglicanism were no less able. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 7 

Rev. Mr. Caley, who is an authority on Sunday 
Schools and Sunday School work, was a special 
speaker at the Second Conference when he lectured 
on The Sunday School and made such an impres- 
sion that he finally promised to return. His subject 
this year was The Bible. 

The subjects of Mr. Caley 's addresses on the Bible 
were: 

1. The Bible: The Word of God. 

2. The Old Testament: Its Purpose and Divi- 
sions. 

3. The Old Testament: The Kingdom to Christ. 

4. The New Testament. 

5. The Institution of the Bible. 

W$t -program 

The members of the Conference gathered at St. 
Mary's Monday evening, June 3d, and the opening 
service was held in the Chapel at 9 o'clock, when 
Rev. Mr. Caley delivered an address preparatory 
to the Holy Communion, which was celebrated each 
morning of the Conference at 7 :30. 

The sessions opened each day with morning- 
prayer in the Chapel at 9. Three sessions were held 
each morning at 9:30, 10:30 and 12 noon. Most 
of these sessions were given up to the addresses by 
Bishop Kinsman and Mr. Caley, but the 10:30 ses- 
sion on Tuesday and Thursday, and a daily after- 
noon session were utilized by the Conference for dis- 
cussions upon various matters of interest under the 



8 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

general direction of a committee chosen for that pur- 
pose by the members. (For details see page 21.) 

The night sessions held in the School Auditorium 
at 8 :30 on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, were 
attended by the public and consisted of illustrated 
lectures by the Rev. Mr. Caley on The Earthly Life 
of Jesus Christ. 

The Rector of the School being obliged by other 
duties to be away at the time of this third Confer- 
ence, appointed Rev. Milton A. Barber, of Raleigh, 
a member of the Board of Trustees of St, Mary's, to 
act in his stead, a duty which he filled very accept- 
ably. 

Che Daily program of tfjc Chtrb Conference 
Monday, June 3, 9:00 p. m. Opening Service. 
7:30 a.m. (daily). Holy Communion. 
8:00 a.m. Breakfast. 
9:00 a.m. (daily). Morning Prayer. 
9:30 a.m. (daily). Addresses by Mr. Caley. 
10:30 a.m. (Wednesday and Friday). Addresses by Bishop 
Kinsman. 
( Tuesday and Thursday ) . Informal Sessions of 
the Conference. 
12:00 noon (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday) . Addresses 
by Bishop Kinsman. 
1 :30 p.m. Dinner. 

Informal Sessions in the afternoon as arranged 
by the Conference Committee. 
7:00 p.m. Supper. 

8:30 p.m. (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday) . Illustrated 
lectures by Rev. Mr. Caley on The Earthly 
Life of Jesus Christ. 
Friday, June 7, 11:30 a.m. Closing Service. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 9 

&fio$e tn gfttenbance at tfje &f)tro Conference 

Diocese of North Carolina: 

Rev. Theo. Andrews Wilkesboro 

Rev. Milton A. Barber Raleigh 

Rev. S. S. Bost Durham 

Rev. S. J. M. Brown Gooleemee 

Rt. Rev. Jos. B. Cheshire, D.D Raleigh 

Rev. H. T. Cocke Winston-Salem 

Rev. W. J. Gordon Spray 

Rev. E. H. Goold Raleigh 

Rev. H. T. Gregory Southern Pines 

Rev. W. H. Hardin Salisbury 

Rev. F. H. T. Horsfield Oxford 

Rev. N. C. Hughes Raleigh 

Rev. J. E. Ingle Raleigh 

Rev. Francis Joyner Littleton 

Rev. C. H. Ketchum Hillsboro 

Rev. E. A. Osborne Charlotte 

Rev. R. B. Owens Rocky Mount 

Rev. I. McK. Pittenger, D.D Raleigh 

Rev. W. J. Smith Charlotte 

Rev. J. H. Swann Raleigh 

Rev. T. L. Trott Durham 

Mr. Herbert Cunningham Halifax 

Mr. R. T. Gregory Stovall 

Prof. L. L. Hargraves Battleboro 

Mr. M. DeL. Haywood Raleigh 

Prof. J. C. Horner Oxford 

Mr. H. M. London Pittsboro 

Mr. Herbert Petar Ridgeway 

Mr. C. W. Pardo Sanford 

Mr. W. E. Stone Raleigh 

Mr. A. W. Taylor Roanoke Rapids 

2 



10 -ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Diocese of East Carolina: 

Rev. M. E. Bethea Williamston 

Rev. R. B. Diane, D.D Edenton 

Rev. J. H. Griffith Kinston 

Rev. B. S. Lassiter Hertford 

Rev. T. P. Noe Wilmington 

Mr. G. F. Hill Wilmington 

Mr. H. W. Hewlett Wilmington 

Mr. C. H. Huband Wilmington 

Mr. M. W. Uzzell , . Seven Springs 

Judge F. D. Winston Windsor 

District of Asheville: 

Rev. A. S. Lawrence Legerwood 

Rev. F. D. Lobdell Rutherfordton 

Rev. R. N. Willcox • Hendersonville 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 11 

Cfie gtobre&seg anb Utttuwst m Betatl 

iflr. Calep's Xetturesi 

In Mr. Caley's first lecture on the "Bible: The 
Word of God," his theme was the Book, the Person, 
and the Institution, the Bible, Jesus Christ, and the 
Church. 

"The climax of God's creation is man. Nations 
rise and fall, but their writings remain and affect us 
today. The one book that stands absolutely supreme 
and unique is The Booh, the Bible. In 1800 it had 
been translated into thirty languages and dialects; 
today the number is 432. The English Bible is in- 
comparably the most valuable book in the world and 
undoubtedly the most popular. 

"Use the Bible and it will prove its divine origin. 
Four reasons for believing it to be the Word of God 
are: 

"First, the testimony of history. 

"Second, its archaeology. 

"Third, its wonderful unity. 

"Fourth, the supreme testimony of human experi- 
ence." 

Keplying to the question of the skeptic who asked 
"How do I know that the sun exists ?" one answered, 
"Because it warms me." The speaker said: "How 
do I know that the Bible is the word of God % Be- 
cause it speaks to me." 

In the second and third lectures on "The Old Tes- 



12 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

taonent, Its Purpose and Divisions," and "The 
Kingdom to Christ/' Mr. Caley said in part: 

"One of the most encouraging signs of the times, 
from a religious standpoint is the present day inter- 
est in Bible study. The clergy can do much to stim- 
ulate this interest by preaching more about the Bible, 
taking it up book by book, and going through it with 
their people in their sermons. 

"The purpose of the Old Testament is to give a 
history of God's chosen people, and this history be- 
gins with the call of Abraham, in Gen. 12. The 
first chapters of Genesis sketch briefly, the creation 
of the world and of man and God's dealings with him 
before that time, but the fact that the first nine chap- 
ters of Genesis cover a greater period of time than 
all the rest of the Old Testament together, shows us 
that though the Biblical account of the creation is in 
accordance with the conclusions of science, the pur- 
pose of the Old Testament is not to teach science, 
but religion." 

He then pointed out that the history of the Jews 
as given in the Old Testament falls naturally into 
three great divisions. 

1. The Tribal, from the call of Abraham, to the 
death of Samuel. 

2. The Regal, from the accession of Saul, to the 
time of the exile. 

3. The Servile, from the exile to the time of 
Malachi. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 13 

He then subdivided each of these periods, taking 
up first the Patriarchal, then the journey through 
the wilderness, and lastly the sojourn in Canaan, and 
commenting on each, showing among other things 
how the nation was taught to govern itself through 
the moral law of the ten commandments given at 
Sinai, and the civil law based thereon ; that they 
were brought to a realization of their relationship 
to God, and that a complete system of religious wor- 
ship was given to them. It was God's purpose, not 
merely to bless them, but to make them a blessing to 
others and so they became the preservers and pro- 
tectors of the knowledge and worship of the one true 
God. 

The Regal period was also treated under three 
heads, (a) the United Kingdom under Saul who 
established it, and introduced the regal life ; David, 
who united and extended it, and Solomon, who built 
its temple ; (b) The Divided Kingdom, under which 
came the captivity of Israel and the exile of Judah, 
and (c) The Kingdom of Judah, which lasted about 
134 years after the Captivity and of whose nineteen 
kings, two, Hezekiah and Josiah, stand preeminent. 

Then came the Servile period, (a) The Exile, 
which exerted a remarkable influence in several 
ways, making them a commercial people, enlarging 
their social horizon, and developing and deepening 
their spiritual nature through a greater reverence 
for the Scriptures and a stricter observance of the 
Sabbath ; (b) After 70 years of captivity, a decree of 



14 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Cyrus permitted those who wished to return to their 
own country, and under Zerubbabel, Ezra and ISTe- 
hemiah, thousands did so; (c) Mr. Caley then briefly 
sketched the history of the Jews from the time of 
their last prophet, Malachi, to the coming of the 
Christ, showing how God in his dealings with them 
and the world was preparing the way for the advent 
of Him who came to save His people from their sins. 

The subject of the fourth address was "The New 
Testament." Briefly reviewing the previous lectures 
in which he had showed that the Old Testament rep- 
resented a national covenant, and stood for law with 
the keynote righteousness, and the ISTew Testament, a 
personal covenant, standing for grace with the key- 
note redemption, he passed on to speak of the New 
Testament and its customary division into three 
parts, historical, didactic, and prophetical, but pre- 
ferred a four-fold division into the Gospels as the 
account of the personal life of Christ, the Acts as 
the power of His work, the Epistles as containing 
the precepts, and the Revelation by St. John as the 
program of the work — "When the Kingdom shall be 
the world." 

He then proceeded to speak of the individual 
writers of the Gospels, who they were, why they 
wrote and the keynote of the message of each one. 
St. Matthew, a Jew with intimate knowledge of the 
Jewish customs and traditions ; and also a Roman 
official, a tax gatherer, portrays Jesus as King. We 
find the keynote in St. Matthew 28:19: "Go ye 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 15 

therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the 
name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy 
Ghost ; teaching them to observe all things whatso- 
ever I have commanded you ; and lo, I am with you 
alway, even unto the end of the world." St. Mark, 
the companion and friend of St. Peter, we find writ- 
ing from the point of view of that active and im- 
pulsive apostle ; so much so that the second gospel 
might be called the gospel according to St. Peter. 
Every incident recorded of our Lord's life by this 
evangelist has St. Peter connected with it. Here we 
see Jesus portrayed as the busy servant of God. 
"He went about doing good; came not to be minis- 
tered unto but to minister," is the keynote of this 
gospel. 

St. Luke, the cultivated Greek, a physician, a 
trained man who had traveled largely and knew 
men, wrote of Jesus as he appealed to him most, i. e. 
as the ideal man; while St. John, the beloved dis- 
ciple, essentially a mystic but Jew by birth, gives us 
the portrayal of Jesus as Saviour of all the world, 
the Son of God. St. John 3:16, "For God so loved 
the world that he gave his only begotten Son, that 
whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but 
have everlasting life." 

The Book of Acts, said Mr. Caley, might well be 
called the Gospel of the Holy Ghost. The keynote 
is found in Acts 1 :8, "But ye shall receive power, 
after that the Holy Ghost is come upon you : and ye 
shall be witnesses unto me both in Jerusalem, and in 



16 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

all Judea, and in Samaria, and unto the uttermost 
part of the earth." Here we have given the power, 
the purpose and the program of the church. St. 
Paul's message in this book was that the kingdoms 
of this world were to become the kingdoms of our 
Lord and His church and he preached it with abso- 
lute assurance. 

Turning to the Pauline and then the catholic or 
general epistles, they were found to be divided into 
four natural groups separated by about five years 
each, beginning with 1st and 2d Thess., in 51 or 52 
A. D., and ending with 1st and 2d Timothy, in 
which St. Paul preached hope for a dark and despair- 
ing world through the gospel, which is "the power of 
God unto salvation," showing further in his last epis- 
tles the necessity of the corporate as well as the indi- 
vidual Christian life that the church might go forth 
to win the world for Christ. The catholic epistles 
contain, the lecturer showed, teaching on the four 
cardinal virtues of the Christian life. St. James sets 
forth the necessity of Works ; St. Peter emphasized 
characteristically the virtue of Hope ; while St. 
John's epistles were the exponents of Love, and St. 
Jude's the epistle of Faith. Finally that so fre- 
quently misunderstood Book of Revelation was 
briefly but most clearly set forth as the program of 
our Lord and his church. 

Mr. Caley closed with a touchingly beautiful and 
masterly summary of the message of the whole 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 17 

Bible — a summary which could leave no shadow of 
doubt as to the divine inspiration of the Book of 
Books. This address was magnificent and reached 
the highwater mark so far in the services. 

At 10:30 on Friday Mr. Caley gave the last of 
his lectures on the Bible, the special subject being 
"The Institution of the Bible." He made the point 
that we can not understand the history of the Bible 
until we go back to the institution of the Bible. 
After the Bible opens we have the altar and sacrifice. 
This is the underlying principle of the Jewish re- 
ligion. He then spoke of the offerings ; ( 1 ) the sin 
offering where the sinner provides the animal for 
sacrifice outside of the camp; (2) the peace offering, 
the animal to be partly eaten and partly offered to 
God; (3) the burnt offering. 

Under the head of Jewish worship comes the Tab- 
ernacle worship, given in detail in the Old Testa- 
ment ; the court ; the holy place ; the most holy place 
with three orders of ministers to serve in each; the 
Levites ; the priests and the high priest, (b) The 
Sabbath the day set apart, not simply for rest, but for 
worship, one of the greatest blessings of God to man ; 
(c) The Synagogue worship instituted to make the 
worship of the Jews permanent ; since the institution 
of this worship the Jews have never apostatized from 
God. The Christian church. In the New Testament 
we have the last and greatest institution, that of the 
Christian church. Our Lord said to St. Peter after 
his confession: "Upon this rock I will build my 



18 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

church." God's purpose is to use the church to ex- 
tend the kingdom. The institutions in the Old Tes- 
tament are fulfilled and explained in the Christian 
church. Take, for example, the two great sacrifices. 
The Christian church is also to be the great teacher 
of the world and is especially for service, service to 
God and to mankind. The motto of every Christian 
should be "Saved to Serve." 

Jltgfjop Etngman'st Utttmta on ' pastes of iWooern 
iHngltcantem" 

In listening to these lectures, scholarly and pro- 
found, and demanding the undivided and constant 
attention of the hearer, the need of an expert stenog- 
rapher to do justice to them was clearly evident, so 
that only a bare outline of their contents is at- 
tempted. 

In his first lecture he began by saying that the 
outstanding event of the reign of George the Second 
was the beginning of the "Evangelical Movement." 
He then went very fully into the life, character, and 
work of John Wesley, and of Whitefield and showed 
the bearing of their views and teachings on current 
thought. He also showed, especially by reading a 
little known letter of Charles Wesley — his loyalty to 
the Church of England. At the close he quoted Mr. 
Wesley as having said: "I am your servant so long 
as you remain members of the Church of England, 
but no longer." 

In his second lecture the Bishop treated in a most 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 19 

elucidating and interesting manner the Tractarian 
movement in England, taking as the three exponents 
of the different phases of this movement, John Keble 
as representing the Evangelical side, Dr. Pusey, the 
theological side, and Cardinal Newman those who 
were carried by the movement into the Church of 
Rome. 

In his third lecture he spoke of the results in the 
Church of England of the Liberal movement at the 
end of the eighteenth century and the succeeding 
evangelical movement resulting in the development 
of Anglican liberalism which has shown itself a 
power throughout the whole Christian church among 
English sjDeaking people. 

The Liberals of the eighteenth century were 
rather easy going scoffers, easy going in their life, 
finding fault with conventions and old fashioned 
ways, but offered nothing in the way of improve- 
ment or solution of the difficulties which they discov- 
ered. The evangelical movement which succeeded 
with "its justification by faith," restored the waning 
life in the church. 

In the third decade of the nineteenth century sev- 
eral men stood out foremost in bringing about a 
change in English thought. Thomas Arnold, of 
Rugby, an example of the ethical type, the muscular 
Christian, the "man," standing for the comprehen- 
siveness of the English church, withal somewhat nar- 
row towards the high churchman. Arthur Penrhyn 
Stanley, a man of personal charm, wide comprehen- 
siveness and all-embracing charity, but somewhat 



20 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

vague in his teaching, with too little of definite pur- 
pose. He brought the influence of the church to bear 
on all sorts of things as Dean of Westminster, in the 
great metropolitan city of London, "the spirit of 
righteousness in all sorts of ways." Third, Arch- 
bishop Tait, the man of practical, common sense and 
great influence for positive righteousness, especially 
in the House of Lords, and Frederick Denison 
Maurice, the man who took a positive stand in doc- 
trine, emphasizing faith in God; the philosophical 
type of Liberalism whose strength lay in motives and 
fearless devotion to truth, which is shown in all kinds 
of ways, the father of the social service movement. 
Another man influenced by Maurice was Charles 
Kingsley with his insistence on God's truth shown in 
all the world. 

The Bishop then compared these leaders with the 
early teachers of the Alexandrian church and showed 
many parallels between them. He spoke of the great 
influence of these men on present thought among the 
religious leaders throughout the English speaking 
world. 

On Friday at 9 :30 occurred the last lecture of the 
course. It is impossible to give a synopsis of this lec- 
ture, so unified was it, and each part so necessary to 
an intelligent understanding of the whole. In gen- 
eral it was a critique of the teaching and doctrine of 
the Anglican church, especially in regard to the 
Eucharist and Confirmation and comparison with 
pre-reformation teachings. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 21 

Jllr. Calep'3 Httlusitrateo Hectares; on tfje ILilt of Cfjrisft 

Doubtless the thought expressed by one member 
was common to many, that he had never before had 
an opportunity to see and hear such an intimate and 
realistic presentation of the facts in the life of Our 
Lord. On the different evenings we saw the private 
life of the Messiah, from the Annunciation to His 
Baptism, a period of preparation; then the years of 
the ministry itself; and lastly the events of Passion 
Week, the Crucifixion, the Great Commission, and 
the Ascension. The slides, taken from many famous 
paintings both ancient and modern and from recent 
photographs of scenes in the Holy Land were beau- 
tiful, many of them quite unknown to most of us, 
and Mr. Caley with a singularly clear and sympa- 
thetic voice made the whole story wonderfully 
graphic and real. The work in our Sunday Schools 
would be much more interesting and thorough could 
the teachers have the inspiration of such lectures as 
these. 

Cfje Snformal Conferences! 

At various times set apart for this purpose the 
members of the Conference, under the general direc- 
tion of a committee chosen for this purpose consist- 
ing of Eev. Theo. A. Andrews, chairman ; Arch- 
deacons Hardin and Hughes, Rev. M. E. Bethea, and 
Mr. Herbert Cunningham, discussed a number of 
topics of interest, among others : Social Service, 



22 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

Sunday School Workers, Lay Evangelization, and 
Church Advertising. 

The Eev. Mr. Cocke, of Winston-Salem, gave a 
very graphic picture of certain phases of the social 
evil, not only in cities like Chicago, but in our cities 
in iSTorth and South Carolina, and of work being car- 
ried on against it in his town. The Conference ap- 
pointed a committee to take charge of this matter. 

On the question of Lay Evangelization or the 
greater use of laymen as parish helpers in evange- 
listic work, the Eev. Mr. ~Noe, of Wilmington, spoke 
of the impressiveness of certain services in East 
Carolina where Bishop Strange called laymen to the 
chancel rail and in the presence of the congregation 
formally licensed them to do lay work. 

Mr. Barber spoke of the work that men can do for 
boys on week days, by looking after them, directing 
them, helping them with advice and organizing them 
for work. 

In connection with church advertising, stress was 
laid on the use of local papers in advertising the serv- 
ices, in giving information about special seasons and 
special meetings, such as Convocations, and in teach- 
ing the members of the congregation to be the 
mediums of information about services and other 
church matters. 

Gftje Clositng g>erbtee 

The formal sessions of the Conference ended with 
the simple closing service on Friday at 11 :30, con- 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 23 

ducted by Bishop Cheshire. Rev. Mr. Barber ex- 
pressed the general feeling of thankfulness to Bishop 
Kinsman and Mr. Caley for their singularly stimu- 
lating and helpful addresses and asked the members 
present to act as missionaries next year to increase 
the attendance and thus give larger opportunity for 
the manifest usefulness of the Conference. Bishop 
Cheshire added his hearty approval to what Mr. 
Barber had said. 

The general opinion expressed was that in point of 
interest, helpfulness and enthusiasm the Conference 
this year "reached the high water mark," as one 
member expressed it. 



24 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

devolutions; of tfje {Efrirb Conference 

At a meeting held June 6th the St. Mary's Con- 
ference adopted the following resolution: 

Whereas, through, the generosity and kindness of the Trus- 
tees of St. Mary's School, many of the clergy and laity of the 
Carolinas have spent a most profitable and delightful week 
at the St. Mary's Conference, and realize the value of such 
conferences in stimulating church work and life, and in pro- 
moting sympathy and friendship among church workers; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we extend to the Trustees of St. Mary's 
School our sincere thanks for the kind hospitality of the 
School, and assure them of our deep appreciation of their 
kindness in making it possible for us to meet under such 
pleasant and happy conditions. 

The following resolutions were also adopted: 

Resolved, That the Conference of St. Mary's School express 
to the Rev. Mr. Lay their sincere appreciation of his efforts 
in planning this Conference, which has proven so beneficial, 
and assure him that the week has been a very happy and a 
helpful one. 

Resolved, That a hearty vote of thanks be extended to 
Bishop Kinsman and the Rev. L. N. Caley for their instruct- 
ive addresses given at this Conference. 

Resolved, That a vote of thanks be extended likewise to the 
Rev. M. A. Barber and to the members of St. Mary's who have 
aided unsparingly in the entertainment and management of 
this most successful Conference. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 25 

fltfje $rebiou£ Conference* 

In June, 1910, at the First Conference the special 
speakers were Bishop Kinsman, of Delaware, and 
Rev. R. W. Patton, Department Secretary of the 
Board of Missions. There were also addresses on the 
Church's Duty to the Negro, by the Rev. Edward 1ST. 
Joyner, formerly Archdeacon for Colored Work in 
the Diocese of South Carolina, and Rev. Henry B. 
Delany, Archdeacon of the Colored Convocation in 
North Carolina. 

The laymen's meeting at night was presided over 
by Hon. J. C. Buxton, of Winston-Salem, N. C. 

At the Second Conference in June, 1911, the 
speakers were Rev. L. N. Caley, of Philadelphia, on 
the general subject of Sunday School Work, four 
lectures; Rev. F. J. Mallett, Ph.D., of Salisbury, 
N. C, on Present Day Problems Confronting the 
Church, four lectures ; and Mr. Eugene M. Camp, 
of New York, President of the Seabury Society, five 
addresses on The Church's Position in Present Day 
Affairs. 

In addition to these morning addresses there were 
night sessions in the School Auditorium with an 
address by Rev. W. S. Claiborne, of the University 
of the South ; two illustrated lectures on The Church 
of England in the Colonies and The Episcopal 
Church in the United States by Rev. Mr. Caley ; and 



26 ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 

an address on Work Among the Mill People, by 
Rev. C. P. Willcox, of Mayodan, N. C. 

At the close of the Second Conference a Coope- 
rating Committee was appointed to secure attendance 
at the next Conference, to suggest subjects for the 
opening meetings, and in other ways to aid the Rec- 
tor in furthering the purposes of the Conferences. 
This Committee consisted of Rev. Milton A. Bar- 
ber of Raleigh, and Mr. Henry M. London of Pitta- 
boro, of the Diocese of ISTorth Carolina ; Rev. Thos. 
P. ISToe of Wilmington, and Mr. John G. Bragaw, 
Jr., of Washington, of the Diocese of East Carolina ; 
Rev. F. D. Lobdell of Rutherfordton, and Mr. Thos. 
T. Valentine of Hendersonville, of the District of 
Asheville, and Rev. T. T. Walsh of Yorkville, and 
Mr. P. T. Hayne of Greenville, of the Diocese of 
South Carolina. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN. 27 

iHemortal on tfje Eeu. ffltMtzlp Buboes 

At the Second Conference the following memorial 
on the Eev. McjSTeely DuBose was adopted by the 
Conference, but as no Bulletin of that Conference 
was issued the memorial is here printed for the first 
time: 

It is with profound regret that this Conference makes note 
of the death of the Eev. McNeely DuBose. Those of us who 
were last year in attendance recall his great interest and 
helpfulness. We recognized in him a wholesome sense of 
duty, strong and noble impulses, with a fraternal spirit to 
which, as among us here, so wherever he was known there 
was a ready and steady response. And now that his min- 
istry is transferred to realms beyond the veil and we shall 
see him no more until we also go hence, we would thus make 
record of our estimate of him, and pay loving tribute to his 
character. We share with Mrs. DuBose and his children the 
common loss of so true a man, and express to them our warm- 
est sympathy. We request that a copy of this minute be 
sent to Mrs. DuBose and filed with the proceedings of this 
Conference. 

Edmund N. Joynee, 
Isaac Wayne Hughes, 
M. DeLancey Haywood, 

Committee. 



August, 1912 Series I, No. 25 



BULLETIN 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

Catalogue JHumfoer 



Published Quarterly by St. Mary's School 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. C, as Second Class Mattes 
Under Act of Congress of Jolt 16, 1894 



RALEIGH, N. C. 
Founded in 1842 by Aldert Smedes, D.D. 




l'ANUHAMK HEW «'l SI MU1VS I1A1.I.U.I 



august, 1912 feeder I, J2o. 25 

BULLETIN 




Baletgf), H. C. 

Catalogue JUtmtfjer 



Publish QPuarferlij by §>i. ilflanj'0 i^rtfool 

3&altiqb, iJortf) Carolina 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. C, as Second Class Matter 
Under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



CALENDAR 



1912 



SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


s 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 












1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


1!) 


20 


21 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


25 


27 


2S 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 












27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




1 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


29 


30 


31 











1913 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 








1 


2 


3 


4 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


7 


H 


9 


10 


11 


12 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


IS 


19 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


19 


21) 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




27 


28 


29 


30 








27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 














1 










1 


2 


3 












1 


2 














1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


23 
30 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 














1 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




1 


2 


3 


4 5 


6 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 12 


13 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


15 


16 


17 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


14 


15 


16 


17 


1819 


20 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 22 


23 


24 


25 


26, 


27 


28 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 26 


27 


23 


24 


25, 


26 


27| 


28 


29 ,29 


10 












28 


29 


iO 










2S 


29 


30 


31 








30 


31 










II 












1 































1914 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


TJF 


s 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


8 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 










1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 








1 


2 


3 


4 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 10 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 


14 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


5 


6 


7 


s 


9 


10 


11 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 17 


1516 


17 


18 


19 20 


21 


15 


16 


17 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 24 


i22.23 


24 


25 


26 27 


28 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 31 


1 | 






1 




29 


30 


31 










26 


27 


28 


29 


30 







Calendar for 1912=13 



1912. 
September 16, Monday Faculty assemble at St. Mary's. 

September 17, Tuesday Registration and Classification of City 

Pupils; New Boarding Pupils report by 
7 p. m. 

September 18, Wednesday Preliminary Examinations; Old Boarding 

Pupils report by 7 p.m.: Registration and 
Classification of Boarding Pupils. 

September 19, Thursday Opening service of Advent Term (First 

Half-year) at 9 a. m. 

November 1, Friday All Saints: Founders' Day. 

November 21, Thursday Second Quarter begins. 

November 28 Thanksgiving Day. 

December 20 — January 7 Christmas Recess. 

1913. 

January 7, Tuesday All pupils report by 7 p. m. 

January 23, Thursday Easter Term (Second Half-year) begins. 

February 5, Ash Wednesday Lent begins. 

March 16, Palm Sunday Annual Visit of the Bishop for Confirma- 
tion. 

March 20, Thursday Last Quarter Begins. 

March 21, Good Friday Holy Day. 

May 12, Monday ..Alumnae Day: 71st Anniversary of the 

Founding of St. Mary's. 

May 25 — May 27 Commencement Season. 

September 18, Thursday 72d Session Begins. 

No absence from the school is allowed at or near Thanksgiving 
Day, Washington's Birthday, or from Palm Sunday to Easter 
inclusive. The only recess is at Christmas. 



Hfnbex 

PAGE 

The Calendar for 1912-13 3 

The Board of Trustees 5 

The Faculty and Officers for 1912-13 6 

History and Description of the School 9 

Location 12 

Equipment 13 

The Life 16 

The School Work 19 

The Student Organizations 20 

Work of the Departments 23 

Upper Preparatory 24 

The College 24 

Admission 25 

Certificates 28 

Examination, Special Courses, Classification 29 

Graduation 30 

Awards 31 

Requirements for Certificates and Credits 33 

The Regular Academic Course 35 

General Courses 38 

The Courses in Detail 40 

History 40 

English and Literature 42 

Foreign Languages, Ancient and Modern.. 44 

Mathematics 49 

Natural Science 51 

Philosophy 52 

Pedagogy 53 

Bible Study 54 

Department of Music 56 

Art Department 68 

Business Department 70 

Elocution Department 73 

Domestic Science 76 

General Regulations 79 

Terms 84 

Requisites 89 

Scholarships 90 

The Alumnae 92 

Form of Bequest 94 



W)t Jloaro of Gfrugteeg 



Cijc ?@i£ff)0p£ 

Rt. Rev. Jos. Blount Cheshire, D.D., Chairman Raleigh, N. G. 

Rt. Rev. Robt. Strange, D.D Wilmington, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Wm. Alexander Guerry Charleston, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner .Asheville, N. C. 

Clerical anb Hap KxMtttfi 

NORTH CAROLINA. 
Rev. M. A. Barber, Raleigh. Rev. J. E. Ingle, Henderson. 

Rev. Harris Mallinckrodt, Charlotte. Dr. R. H. Lewis, Raleigh. 
Col. Chas. E. Johnson, Raleigh. 'Hon. R. H. Battle, Raleigh. 

Mr. W. A. Erwin, Durham. Mr. D. Y. Cooper, Henderson, 

(until 1915.) (until 1918.) 

EAST CAROLINA. 
Rev. R. B. Drane, D.D., Edenton. Rev. T. P. Noe, Wilmington. 

Mr. Frank Wood, Edenton. Mr. Geo. C. Royall, Goldsboro. 

(until 1915.) (until 1918.) 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 
Rev. T. T. Walsh, Yorkville. Rev. L. G. Wood, Charleston. 

Mr. P. T. Hayne, Greenville. Mb. T. W. Bacot, Charleston, 

(until 1914.) (until 1914.) 

ASHEVILLE. 
Rev. W. R. Dte, Lincolnton. Rev. J. W. Areson, Tryon. 

Hon. Wm. A. Hoke, Lincolnton. Mr. F. A. Clinard, Yadkin Vallej. 

(until 1915.) (until 1914.) 

Cxecutibe Committee 

Rt. Rev. J. B. Cheshire, D.D., Chairman. 
Col. Chas. E. Johnson. Dr. R. H. Lewis. 

Hon. W. A. Hoke. Mr. W. A. Erwin. 

Mb. D. Y. Cooper. Mr. George C. Royall. 

^etretatrp anb treasurer 

Dr. K. P. Battle, Jb. 
♦Deceased. 



tZDfje Jfacultp anb (Btiktvsi of g>t. JHarp's; 

19X2=1913 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector 

Miss REBECCA SCHENCK Lady Principal 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Secretary 

3Tfje Scabemu department 
Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Bible, Ethics, and Greek 

(A.B. , Yale, 1882; B.D., General Theological Seminary, 1885; master 
in St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., 1888-1907. Rector of St. Mary's, 
1907—) 

"WILLIAM E. STONE English, History, and German 

(A.B., Harvard, 1882; principal Edenton, N. C, Academy, 1901-02; 
master in Porter Academy, Charleston, 1902-'03. St. Mary's,il903 — ) 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Science 

(A.B., Washington College, Md., 1897; A.M., 1898; graduate student 
Johns Hopkins University, 1900. St. Mary's, 1903—) 

HELEN URQUHART Latin 

(A.B., Mount Holyoke, 1910. St. Mary's, 1910—) 

MARGARET RICKS Mathematics 

(A.B., Converse College, 1907; A.M., Georgetown College (Ky.) 1911; 
student at Knoxville Summer school. St. Mary's, 1911 — ) 

BLANCHE E. SHATTUCK English 

(Graduate Boston (Mass.) High School; graduate and post-graduate 
Boston School of Expression; student Harvard Summer School; 
instructor in Greensboro Female College, Wilson College, High Point 
Schools, etc. St. Mary's, 1912—) 

MARIE RUDNICKA French 

(Cours de l'Hotel de Ville, Paris; instructor in St. Mary's College, 
Dallas, 1907-'12. St. Mary's, 1912—) 

REBECCA SCHENCK History 

(Graduate Greensboro Female College; instructor in State Normal 
College, Greensboro. St. Mary's, 1912 — ) 

FLORENCE C. DAVIS Elocution and Physical Culture 

(B.O., Emerson College, Boston, 1906; Elmira College; Posse Gym- 
nasium. St. Mary's, 1911 — ) 

S. MARGUERITE LANE Domestic Science 

(Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. St. Mary's, 1911—) 

KATE McKIMMON Primary School 

(Student and teacher at St. Mary's since 1861.) 

MARY SULLY HAYWARD Preparatory Work 

(A.B., Hollins, 1909; instructor in Powhatan Institute (Va.), 1909-'ll. 
St. Mary's, 1911—) 

FRANCES R. BOTTUM Assistant 

(Graduate St. Mary's, 1912. Assistant, 1912—) 



ittugic department 

MARTHA A. DOWD, Director \ JJ a ? ' Th ?°7/' • 

' \ History of Music 

(Graduate of St, Mary's, 1884; pupil of Kuersteiner, Sophus Wiig, Albert 
Mack. St. Mary's, 1886—; Director of Music, 1908—) 

R. BLINN OWEN Organ, In charge of Voice 

(M.Mus., Detroit School of Music; pupil of Zimmermann, Mazurette, 
Theo. Beach of Detroit; Kreutsehmar, in New York; teacher in 
Detroit and New York; private teacher in Bluefield, W. Va., and 
Greensboro, N. C., 1906-'09. St. Mary's, 1909—) 

ELLA DORROH Piano 

(Certificate in Piano, St. Mary's, 1910; Diploma, 1911. St. Mary's, 1910—) 

LUCY BACON Piano 

(Graduate Elmira College (N. Y.) School of Music, 1907; pupil of Gott- 
fried Galston in Berlin, 1908; teacher at Western Maryland College, 
Wilson College, Mansfield State Normal School, etc. St. Mary's 
1912—) 

EDNA GRAVES Piano 

(Graduate St. Mary's, San Antonio, Texas, 1907; pupil of Rafael 
Joseffy in New York, 1909-'12; private teacher. St. Mary's, 1912—) 

GLADYS PITCHER Piano 

(Graduate New England Conservatory, 1911; pupil of Baerman, 
Adamowski, Ebon, Shepherd; private teacher. St. Mary's, 1912—) 

ADA OWEN PARKE Violin and Voice 

(College of Music, Cincinnati; pupil in Paris of Campanari, Froelich, 
etc., in Violin; of Grau-Meier andEdouard deReszke in Voice; teacher 
in Southern College, Washington Seminary, etc. St. Mary's, 1912 — ) 

2lrt department 
CLARA I. EENNER, Bireo.or j S^™^ 

(Graduate Maryland Institute School of Art and Design; special 
student Pratt Institute, 1905; special student in Paris, 1907. Director 
of Art, St. Mary's, 1888-'96; 1902—) 

(Elocution department 
FLORENCE C. DAVIS Director 

(B.O., Emerson College, Boston, 1906; Elmira College (N.Y.); Posse 
Gymnasium, Boston; private studio, Elmira; substitute teacher, 
Miss Metcalf's School, Tarrytown, 1908; teacher, Reidsville Seminary 
(N. C), 1909-'ll. Director of Elocution, St. Mary's, 1911—) 

^Business department 

LIZZIE H. LEE, Director / Stenography, Typewriting 

\ Bookkeeping 

(Director of the Department, 1896 — ) 

JULIET B. SUTTON Assistant 

(St. Mary's, 1898—) 



®iiiuv* 1912=13 



Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector 



Miss REBECCA SCHENCK Lady Principal 

Miss MARGUERITE LANE Housekeeper 

Miss LILLIAN FENNER Assistant Housekeeper 

Miss LOLA E. WALTON Matron of the Infirmary 

Db. A. W. KNOX School Physician 



ERNEST CRUIKSHANK, Secretary and Business Manager 

Miss LIZZIE H. LEE .Bookkeeper 

Miss JULIET B. SUTTON Stenographer 



Mes. MARY IREDELL Agent of the Trustees 



St. Maet's School Bulletin. 



St. Mary's School 



Jfyixtovp anb jUesfcriptton 

St. Mary's School was founded in May, 1 842, by the Rev. 
Aldert Smedes, D.D. 

It was established as a Church school for girls and was 
for thirty-six years the chosen work of the founder, of whose 
life work Bishop Atkinson said: "It is my deliberate judg- 
ment that Dr. Smedes accomplished more for the advance- 
ment of this Diocese (North Carolina), and for the promotion 
of the best interests of society in its limits, than any man 
who ever lived in it." 

The present location was first set apart as the site for an 
Episcopal school in 1 832, when influential churchmen, carry- 
ing out a plan proposed by Bishop Ives, purchased the pres- 
ent "Grove" as a part of a tract of 160 acres, to be used in 
establishing a Church school for boys. First the East Rock 
House, then West Rock House and the Main Building were 
built for use in this boys' school. But the school, though it 
started out with great promise, proved unsuccessful and was 
closed; and the property passed back into private hands. 

Dr. Aldert Smedes, a New Yorker by birth and education, 
had given up parish work on account of a weak throat, and 
was conducting a successful girls' school in New York City 
when in 1842 Bishop Ives met him and laid before him the 
opportunity in his North Carolina diocese. The milder 
climate attracted Dr. Smedes; he determined on the effort; 
came to Raleigh with a corps of teachers; gave St. Mary's its 
name, and threw open its doors in May, 1 842. 

From the first the school was a success, and for the re- 
mainder of his life Dr. Smedes allowed nothing to interrupt 
the work he had undertaken. During the years of the War 
between the States St. Mary's was at the same time school 



10 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

and refuge for those driven from their homes. It is a tra- 
dition of which her daughters are proud, that during those 
years of struggle her doors were ever open, and that at one 
time the family of the beloved President of the Confederacy 
were sheltered within her walls. 

On April 25, 1 877, Dr. Smedes died, leaving St. Mary's to 
the care of his son, Rev. Dr. Bennett Smedes, who had been 
during his father's lifetime a teacher in the school. This 
trust was regarded as sacred, and for twenty-two years, in 
which he spared neither pains nor expense, Dr. Bennett 
Smedes carried on his father's work for education. 

During this eventful half-century, St. Mary's was in the 
truest sense a Church school, but it was a private enterprise. 
The work and the responsibility were dependent upon the 
energy of the Drs. Smedes. Permanence required that the 
school should have a corporate existence and be established 
on a surer foundation as a power for good, and in 1897 Dr. 
Bennett Smedes proposed to the Diocese of North Carolina 
that the Church should take charge of the school. 

The offer was accepted; the Church assumed responsibility, 
appointed Trustees, purchased the school equipment from 
Dr. Smedes and the real property from Mr. Cameron; and 
in the fall of 1897 was granted a charter by the General 
Assembly. 

By this act of the Assembly, and its later amendments, the 
present corporation — The Trustees of St. Mary's School — 
consisting of the Bishops of the Church in the Carolinas, 
and clerical and lay trustees from each diocese or district, 
was created. 

The Board of Trustees, by the terms of the charter, is em- 
powered "to receive and hold lands of any value which may 
be granted, sold, devised or otherwise conveyed to said cor- 
poration, and shall also be capable in law to take, receive and 
possess all moneys, goods and chattels of any value and to 
any amount which may be given, sold or bequeathed to or 
for said corporation." 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 11 

The Church was without funds for the purchase of the 
school property, and the Trustees undertook a heavy debt 
in buying it, but the existence of this debt only slightly re- 
tarded the improvements which were made from year to year 
in the school buildings and equipment, and in May, 1906, 
the Trustees were able to announce that the purchase debt 
was lifted and the School was the unencumbered property of 
the Church in the Carolinas. 

Dr. Bennett Smedes, who had long wished for the dispo- 
sition of St. Mary's that was actually effected, continued as 
Rector after the Church assumed charge, until his death on 
February 22, 1899. To succeed him, the Trustees called 
the Rev. Theodore DuBose Bratton, Rector of the Church of 
the Advent, Spartanburg, S. C, and a teacher of long train- 
ing. In September, 1899, Dr. Bratton took charge, and for 
four years administered the affairs of the School very success- 
fully. In May, 1903, he was chosen Bishop of Mississippi. 
In September, 1903, the Rev. McNeely DuBose became 
Rector and the School continued its useful and successful 
career under his devoted care for four years, until he resigned 
in May, 1907, to resume parish work. In September, 1907, 
the Rev. George W. Lay assumed the management. 

Ctmcattonal position 

During the life of the founder, St. Mary's was a high-class 
school for the general education of girls, the training being 
regulated by the needs and exigencies of the times. Pupils 
finished their training without "graduating." In 1879, under 
the second Rector, set courses were established, covering col- 
lege preparatory work without sacrificing the special features 
which the School stands for, and in May, 1 879, the first class 
was regularly graduated. 

By the provisions of the charter of 1897, the Faculty of 
St. Mary's, "with the advice and consent of the Board of 
Trustees, shall have the power to confer all such degrees and 
marks of distinction as are usually conferred by colleges and 



12 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

universities," and at the annual meeting in May, 1900, the 
Trustees determined to establish the College, in which the 
Study of the Liberal Arts and Sciences might be pursued at 
St. Mary's on an equal standard with other colleges for 
women. In carrying out this idea the College was added 
to the Preparatory School. 

The College course is equal to that for which an A.B. degree 
is awarded at a large proportion of our Southern colleges for 
women; and, if the proper electives are chosen, prepares the 
graduates for entrance into the junior class of the best col- 
leges in the country. 

A graduate of St. Mary's receives a diploma; but it has 
been thought wise to confer no degree, although that power 
is specified in the charter. 

St. Mary's at present offers opportunity for continuous 
education from the primary grades through the college; 
but St. Mary's offers more than the opportunity for a 
thorough academic education. Supplementing the work of 
the Academic Department are the Departments of Music, 
Art, and Elocution, the Business Department, and a course 
in Domestic Science. 

The organization, requirements and courses of each of 
these departments are described at length in this catalogue. 

^location 

Raleigh, the Capital of North Carolina, is accessible by 
the Southern, the Seaboard Air Line, and the Norfolk South- 
ern railroads from all directions, affording ready and rapid 
communication with all points in Florida and Georgia, in 
addition to easy access to points in the Carolinas and Vir- 
ginia. It is situated on the eastern border of the elevated 
Piedmont belt, and is free from malarial influences, while a 
few miles to the east the broad level lands of the Atlantic 
coast plain stretch out to the ocean. The city thus enjoys 
the double advantage of an elevation sufficient to insure a 
light, dry atmosphere, and perfect drainage, and propinquity 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 13 

to the ocean sufficiently close to temper very perceptibly 
the severity of the winter climate. The surrounding country 
is fertile and prosperous, affording an excellent market. 

Qftje Campus;, i&utlbmgs; anb General equipment 

St. Mary's is situated on the highest elevation in the city, 
about a half-mile due west of the Capitol, surrounded by its 
twenty-acre grove of original forest of oak and pine, with a 
frontage of about twelve hundred feet on one of the most 
beautiful residence streets. The site is all that can be de- 
sired for convenience, health and beauty. The campus con- 
tains almost a mile of walks and driveways, with tennis 
courts and basketball grounds for outdoor exercise. 

Cfce Jgutlbtngs; 

The buildings are fourteen in number, and are conve- 
niently grouped. All those in the regular work of the School 
are so connected by covered ways that the pupil can go to 
and from classrooms, dining hall, and Chapel without exposure 
to the weather. The buildings are heated by steam and are 
lighted with electricity throughout. Modern fire escapes, 
in addition to other precautions, minimize any danger from 
fire. 

The Main Building, the principal academic building, is 
of brick, three and a half stories high. It contains recrea- 
tion rooms and the Domestic Science Department on the 
basement floor; the parlor and the schoolroom on the first 
floor; rooms for teachers and pupils on the second floor; and 
on the third floor, rooms for pupils and a large dormitory. 
The halls are spacious, with front and rear stairways. Bath- 
rooms and closets are conveniently located in this building 
and in all the buildings used for dormitory purposes. 

Adjoining the Main building on the east and west and 
connected with it are the new Wings, three stories high, built 
in 1909, containing on the lower floors large classrooms and 
on the two upper floors, large comfortable rooms for pupils 



14 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

with two wardrobe closets connected with each room, bath- 
rooms and trunk elevators, and attics for the storage of 
trunks. 

The East and West Rock Houses are two-story stone 
buildings connected with the Main Building by covered cor- 
ridors of brick. The East Rock contains the Rector's office, 
the Post-office and the Business Offices, a sitting room for 
the Faculty, a reception room, and a suite of rooms for the 
Business School on the first floor; on the second floor, rooms 
for teachers and college students. The West Rock has a 
dormitory on the first floor, and on the second, rooms for 
teachers and pupils. 

The North Dormitory, completed in the fall of 1901, is a 
two-story frame building, having rooms for teachers on the 
first floor and on the second floor rooms for students. 

Clement Hall, built in 1910 out of funds bequeathed by 
Miss Eleanor Clement, a former teacher, who in this way 
showed her devotion to St. Mary's, is a large modern building 
situated back of the main group of buildings and connected 
with them by a covered way. It contains on the first floor a 
gymnasium 50 by 90 feet, and above this a spacious dining 
hall capable of seating comfortably three hundred people. 
Back of the dining room are the serving room, kitchen, store- 
rooms, etc. 

The Art Building is a two-story brick building of Gothic 
design. On the first floor are the Library and recitation 
rooms; and on the second floor are the Science Laboratory, 
the Music Director's room, and the Studio. The Studio, a 
spacious gallery 26 by 64 feet, lighted by four large skylights, 
with an open ceiling finished in oil, forms a most beautiful 
home for the Art School. 

The Pittman Memorial Building, a fine auditorium, 
immediately east of the Art Building, was completed in 1 907. 
This building was in large part provided through a bequest 
in the will of Mrs. Mary Eliza Pittman, of Tarboro, and is in 



St. Maky's School Bulletin. 15 

memory of her daughter, Eliza Battle Pittman, formerly a 
pupil of St. Mary's. 

The Piano Rooms, twenty in number, built in 1901, are 
located along one of the covered ways, outside of any of the 
main buildings. They add greatly to the efficiency of the 
Music School, while their location keeps the sound from dis- 
turbing other work. 

The Chapel, designed by Upjohn and built in the early 
days of the School, was entirely rebuilt in 1 905 through the 
efforts of the Alumnae. It is cruciform in shape and has over 
three hundred sittings. It is furnished with a fine pipe organ 
of two manuals and sixteen stops, an "in memoriam" gift of 
Mrs. Bennett Smedes. The services of the Church are held 
here on week days as well as on Sundays. 

The Infirmary, built in 1 903, is the general hospital for 
ordinary cases of sickness. It is built after the most approved 
models, and is provided with the latest sanitary equipment. 
It contains two large wards, a private ward, rooms for the 
Matron, pantry, and bathroom. The Annex, a separate 
building, provides facilities for isolation in case of any pos- 
sible contagious disease. 

The Laundry Building, containing first-class equipment 
for a complete and up-to-date steam laundry for the school, 
was added to the school property in the summer of 1 906. 

The Laundry and Boiler House, with the two large boilers 
which run the steam plant and laundry; the Stables; and the 
Annex-infirmary, held for emergency use in case of conta- 
gious diseases, are all to the rear of the school buildings 
proper, while located conveniently for the purposes for which 
they are used. 

The Rectory of St. Mary's was built in 1 900 upon a beau- 
tiful site on the west side of the campus, and is occupied by 
the Rector's family. On the east side, entirely independent 
of the School but within the Grove, is located the episcopal 
residence of the Diocese of North Carolina, "Ravenscroft." 



16 St. Maky's School Bulletin. 

Cfje %iit at B>t iWarp'g 

The aim of St. Mary's is to make the daily life of the stu- 
dents that of a well-regulated Christian household. The 
effort is to direct the physical, intellectual and moral develop- 
ment of the individual, with all the care that love for young 
people and wisdom in controlling them render possible. 

The pupils are distributed, chiefly in accordance with age 
and classification, among the nine halls and two dormitories. 
North Hall and the East and West Rock Halls contain double 
rooms. In the Main Building the rooms accommodate three 
and four pupils, with a few double rooms. 

The Wings contain twenty double rooms for students, four 
rooms for three and four single rooms. Each hall is pre- 
sided over by a teacher who acts as Hall Mother. The three 
dormitories are spacious and well ventilated. They are 
divided into single alcoves by partitions six feet high, and in 
them the students enjoy the comforts of privacy and at the 
same time are under the wholesome restraint of teachers, of 
whom there is one in each dormitory. These Dormitory 
and Hall Mothers have special opportunities for correcting 
the faults and for training the character of the pupils under 
their charge, and these opportunities have been used with 
marked results. Pupils during their first year at St. Mary's 
are ordinarily assigned to one of the dormitories. 

The school hours, half-past eight to a quarter-past three, 
are spent in recitation, in music practice, or in study in the 
Study Hall or Library, the more advanced pupils being 
allowed to study in their rooms. 

Recreation ^ertobs 

The latter part of the afternoon is free for recreation and 
exercise, and the pupils are encouraged to be as much as pos- 
sible in the open air and are also required to take some 
definite exercise daily. In addition to this exercise each pupil 
(not a Junior or Senior) is required to take definite class in- 



St. Maby's School Bulletin. 17 

struction and practice in Physical Culture three times a week 
under the direction of the instructor in Physical Culture. 
A special division is provided for those who are delicate or 
require some special treatment. 

A half-hour of recreation is enjoyed by the pupils before 
the evening study period and another half-hour after the 
evening study period before going to their rooms for the 
night, when they gather in the roomy parlor, with its old 
associations and fine collection of old paintings, and enjoy 
dancing among themselves, and other social diversions. 

tlfie Htbrarp 

The Library, located in the Art Building, is the center of 
the literary life of the school. It contains upward of twenty- 
five hundred volumes and the leading current periodicals and 
papers. The Library is essentially a work room, and is open 
throughout the day, and to advanced students at night, 
offering every facility for use by the students; and their 
attention is called frequently to the importance of making 
constant and careful use of its resources. 

Cfjapel iperbices 

The Chapel is the soul of St. Mary's, and twice daily 
teachers and pupils gather there on a common footing. 
During the session the religious exercises are conducted very 
much as in any well-ordered congregation. A.s St. Mary's 
is distinctly a Church school, all boarding pupils are required 
to attend the daily services and also those on Sunday. Reg- 
ular day pupils are only required to attend the morning serv- 
ices, and only on the days when recitations are held. 

The systematic study of the Bible is a regular part of the 
school course, and in addition, on Sunday morning the board- 
ing pupils spend a half-hour in religious instruction. 

Care of ^ealtfc 

Whenever a pupil is so indisposed as to be unable to attend 
to her duties or to go to the dining hall, she is required to go 



18 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 

to the Infirmary, where she is removed from the noise of the 
student life and may receive special attention away from con- 
tact with the other pupils. The Matron of the Infirmary has 
general care of the health of the pupils and endeavors to win 
them by personal influence to such habits of life as will pre- 
vent breakdowns and help them overcome any tendencies to 
sickness. Even a slight indisposition is taken in hand at the 
beginning, and thus its development into serious sickness is 
prevented. 

The employment of a School Physician enables the School 
to keep very close supervision over the health of the girls. 
The Medical Fee covers the ordinary attendance of the physi- 
cian and such small doses as pupils need from time to time. 
This arrangement leaves the school free to call in the physician 
at any time, and thus in many cases to use preventive meas- 
ures, where under other circumstances unwillingness to send 
for the doctor might cause delay and result in more serious 
illness. The general health of the School for many years 
past has been remarkable. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 19 



The School Work 

The School Year is divided into two terms of eighteen 
school weeks each. Each term is again divided into two 
"quarters." This division is made to assist in grading the 
progress of the pupil. Reports are mailed at the close of 
each quarter, and when possible also in the middle of each 
quarter. 

It is required that each pupil shall be present at the be- 
ginning of the session, and that her attendance shall be regular 
and punctual to the end. Sickness or other unavoidable 
cause is the only excuse accepted for nonattendance or tar- 
diness. The amount of work to be done, and the fact that it 
must be done within the time planned, makes this rule nec- 
essary to the progress of the pupil in her course. 

It must also be remembered that absence at the beginning 
of the session retards the proper work of the class and is there- 
fore unfair to the school as a whole. 

Wfyt SnteUectual draining 

Particular attention is given to the development of those 
intellectual habits that produce the maximum of efficiency. 
The student is expected to work independently, and grad- 
ually to strengthen the habit of ready, concentrated and 
sustained attention in all her thinking processes. Clearness, 
facility and ease in the expression of thought, oral and writ- 
ten, are carefully cultivated. Every effort is made to de- 
velop the best mental habits through every detail of admin- 
istration which bears upon the intellectual life, whether it be 
recitation, the study hour, the individual help, or some other 
feature of the school management. 

Hectares anb &ecttals 

An important element in the intellectual life of St. Mary's 
is the course of lectures given by distinguished professors 



20 St. Maey's School Bulletin. 

and lecturers from North Carolina and elsewhere. These 
lectures have been of much value to the students, and are 
intended to be a feature of the school life. In addition to 
these, there are given at stated times recitals by musicians 
from abroad, by the Musical Faculty, and by the students of 
the Music Department. 

|§>tubent <^rgani?attong 

While the regular duties at St. Mary's leave few idle mo- 
ments for the pupils, they find time for membership in various 
organizations, conducted by them under more or less direct 
supervision from the School, from which they derive much 
pleasure and profit. These organizations are intended to 
supplement the regular duties and to lend help in the develop- 
ment of different sides of the student life. All qualified stu- 
dents are advised, as far as possible, to take an active part in 
them. 

tJCfje ©Moman'S auxiliary 

The missionary interests of the school, as a whole, are sup- 
plemented by the work of the branches of the Auxiliary. 
The Senior branch is made up of members of the Faculty; 
the pupils make up seven Chapters of the Junior Auxiliary, 
each Chapter being directed by a teacher chosen by its mem- 
bers. These Chapters are known respectively as St. Anne's, 
St. Catharine's, St. Elizabeth's, St. Margaret's, St. Monica's, 
St. Agnes' and Lucy Bratton. 

The work of the individual Chapters varies somewhat from 
year to year, but they jointly maintain regularly "The Aldert 
Smedes Scholarship" in the China Mission, and "The Bennett 
Smedes Scholarship" in the Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte, 
and other beneficent work. 

The Altar Guild has charge of the altar and the decora- 
tion of the Chapel. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 21 

<£l)e lUterarp Societies! 
The work of the two Literary Societies — the Sigma Lambda 
and the Epsilon Alpha Pi — which meet on Tuesday even- 
ings, does much to stimulate the intellectual life. The 
societies take their names from the Greek letters forming the 
initials of the two great Southern poets — Sidney Lanier and 
Edgar Allan Poe. The annual debate between them is a 
feature of the school life. Both boarders and day pupils are 
eligible to membership in these societies. 

GTfje Must Club 

The students publish monthly a school magazine, The 
St Mary's Muse, with the news of the school and its alumnae. 
The Senior Class issues annually a year book, The Muse, 
with the photographs, illustrations, etc., that make it a val- 
ued souvenir. 

For encouraging contributions to these publications, and 
supplementing the regular class work and the work of the 
literary societies, the Muse Club is organized and holds 
its meetings weekly. 

&he &>httd) Club 

The Sketch Club is under the supervision of the Art De- 
partment. Frequent excursions are made during the pleas- 
ant fall and spring weather for the purpose of sketching from 
nature, etc. 

QTbe Bramntic Club 

The Dramatic Club is under the supervision of the Elocu- 
tion Department. Opportunity is afforded for simple general 
training that is frequently valuable in teaching poise, enun- 
ciation, and expression, while care is taken not to allow any 
exaggeration. 

The Club presents annually some simple drama. 

iflusiical ©rgamjattoniS 
The Glee Club is under the supervision of the Music De- 
partment. It affords much pleasure to its members, and 
gives occasional informal recitals. 



22 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 

In addition to this purely voluntary club, the Choir, the 
Orchestra, the String Club, and the Chorus afford pupils both 
in and out of the Music Department opportunity to develop 
their musical talent. 

athletic Clubs 

In addition to the regular instruction given by a competent 
teacher, the pupils, with advisers from the Faculty, have a 
voluntary athletic association, the object of which is to foster 
interest in out of door sports. The Association is divided 
into two clubs for purposes of competition. The Association 
has tennis, basketball, and walking clubs, which are generally 
very active in the season proper for these recreations. 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 23 



Work of the Departments 



gcabemtc department 

I. The Primary School; II. The Preparatory School; III. The 
College. 

The Academic Department affords opportunity for a con- 
tinuous training carried on without interruption from the time 
the pupil enters school until she leaves the college. 

This department consists of the Primary School, the Prepar- 
atory School, and the College. 

The Primary School and the first two years of the Prepara- 
tory School are maintained entirely on account of the local 
demand. They are not intended for boarding pupils (who 
must be ready to enter the third year of the Preparatory 
School, the first High School year). 

I. THE PRIMARY SCHOOL. 

The Primary School covers the work of four grades. It has 
been the aim of those in charge, since the opening of the de- 
partment in 1879, to give its pupils every advantage. To 
vary the monotony of the three R's, lessons in free-hand 
drawing, physical culture and singing are given. Kindergar- 
ten methods in teaching form and color have been used; in 
short, every effort is made to make the instruction interesting 
as well as thorough. 

II. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

The Preparatory School covers a four year course corre- 
sponding to the last two years of a Grammar School and the 
first two years of a High School (7th to 1 Oth grades inclusive) 
of the highest standard. 



24 St. Mauy's School Bulletin. 

Upper preparatory 

The last two years of the Preparatory School and first two 
years of the College cover the work of the best High Schools 
and the courses are numbered for convenience A, B, C and 
D. See pages 35-36. 

The course in the Upper Preparatory is closely prescribed 
and each pupil is expected to adhere to it. It is intended as 
a preparation for the College and is also designed to serve as 
a school for those who, while unable to take a college course, 
intend to enter the Business Department and prepare them- 
selves for employment in the many avenues of commercial 
life now open to women. 

Admission to the Upper Preparatory classes may be al- 
lowed provisionally on certificate without examination; but 
all candidates are advised to bring or send certificates and also 
take such examinations as are necessary. School standards 
differ so materially that much time is lost in the effort to 
classify candidates satisfactorily on certificates alone, since 
this results, in many cases, in failure to succeed in the class 
that is attempted at first. 

At entrance every pupil is required to select some definite 
course and afterwards to keep to it. This requirement is de- 
signed to keep pupils from that vacillating course which puts 
an end to serious work, and can never really accomplish any- 
thing. It is not intended to hinder those who, coming to 
take a special course in Music, Art or Business, desire to 
occupy profitably their spare time in some one or more of the 
courses of the College. 

III. THE COLLEGE. 

The first two years of the present college course are intended 
to complete the work of a first-class high school, and the pupil 
is limited in well-defined lines and not allowed to specialize 
or take elective work except within narrow limits; in the last 
two years the courses are conducted on college lines, and the 



St. Maky's School Bulletin. 25 

pupil, under advice, is permitted in large measure to elect the 
lines of work best suited to her taste and ability. 

The present policy is to make the last two years at St. 
Mary's equal in curriculum and in the quality of the work to 
the first two years of the best colleges for women, so that those 
who may choose to prolong their college work may be fitted 
to enter the Junior Class in such institutions. 

Care must be exercised in this selection to choose courses 
that will secure the necessary aggregate of sixty points and 
that cover the requirements specified on page 30. 

Those who intend to enter some higher institution after 
graduation at St. Mary's should note carefully that the 
courses in the College should be chosen with reference to 
the requirements of the higher classes of the institution to 
which they are expected to go; and that the choke should be 
made as early as possible. A properly arranged course at 
St. Mary's will admit to the Junior Class of the highest 
northern colleges. But the course that might lead to the 
award of a diploma at St. Mary's might not cover the sub- 
jects necessary for entrance to the advanced class of any 
given college of higher grade. 

gtttttriggtott to tfje Jf resijman Clagg 

It is preferred that all applicants should bring Certificates 
showing the work done at their last school along with a Cer- 
tificate of Honorable Dismissal, and that they should also be 
examined. This prevents mistakes and disappointment later 
on and insures better classification. Certificates alone will, 
however, be accepted provisionally for entrance to the Fresh- 
man Class, without examination, from all institutions known 
to us to be of the proper standard. Such certificates must 
state specifically that all work required for entrance has been 
well done, naming text-books, number of pages, and the grade 
or mark received, together with the length of each recitation 
and the time spent upon each branch. 



26 St. Mart's School Bulletin - . 

Parents and teachers will please remember that, in order 
to be of any service whatever, a certificate must cover 
the foregoing points. A statement that a pupil is well- 
behaved and industrious and has received a grade of 90 in 
"English" is of no use whatever in enabling the School 
to decide what work has been accomplished. 

Parents are also urged, wherever possible, to obtain cer- 
tificates of work done, before the close of the school year. 
Teachers are not to blame for inaccuracy in certificates made 
out from memory when absent on their summer vacations. 
Such certificates are, however, of little value. 

&f)e Requirements! for ^omission to the jfregfjman 
Class of g>t. jflarp's g>cfcool 

In order to be admitted to the Freshman Class of the Col- 
lege the pupil must meet the requirements outlined below 
in English, History, Mathematics, Science and one foreign 
language — five subjects in all. If two foreign languages are 
offered Science may be omitted. 

A pupil admitted in four of the five required subjects will 
be admitted as a Conditioned Freshman. 

English and Literature. — A good working knowledge 
of the principles of English Grammar as set forth in such works 
as Buehler's Modern Grammar, with special attention to the 
analysis and construction of the English sentence. 

Knowledge of elementary Rhetoric and Composition as set 
forth in such works as Maxwell's Writing in English, or 
Hitchcock's Exercises in English Composition. 

Candidates are expected to have had at least two years' 
training in general composition (themes, letter writing, and 
dictation). 

Subjects for composition may be drawn from the following 
works, which the pupil is expected to have studied: Long- 
fellow's Evangeline and Courtship of Miles Standish (or 
Tales of a Wayside Inn); selections from Irving's Sketch 
Boo\ (or Irving's Tales of a Traveler); Hawthorne's Twice 
Told Tales; Scott's hanhoe and George Eliot's Silas Marner 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 27 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic complete, with special atten- 
tion to the principles of percentage and interest. Element- 
ary Algebra complete and Advanced Algebra through Quad- 
ratic Equations. 

History. — The History of the United States complete as 
laid down in a good high school text; the essential facts of 
English History; the essential facts of Greek and Roman 
History. 

Latin. — A sound knowledge of the forms of the Latin noun, 
pronoun and verb, and a knowledge of the elementary rules 
of syntax and composition as laid down in a standard first- 
year book and beginner's composition (such as Bennett's 
First Year Latin and Bennett's Latin Composition). The 
first three books of Caesar's Gallic War. 

French or German. — A first-year course leading to the 
knowledge of the elements of the grammar and the ability to 
read simple prose. 

Science. — The essential facts of Physical Geography and 
Physiology as laid down in such texts as Tarr's Physical 
Geography and Martin's Human Body. 

^omission to &bbancea Classes 

In order to be admitted to work higher than that of the 
Freshman Class, students must first be admitted to the 
Freshman Class in the manner detailed above, and must also, 
as a rule, be examined in the work of the College class or 
classes which they wish to anticipate. That is, a candidate 
for the Junior Class, for example, must be examined in the 
studies of the Freshman and Sophomore years. If this is 
done unconditional credit by points, counting toward the 60 
points needed for graduation, is at once given. 

No exception is made to the above requirement of exam- 
ination in one or two subjects where the higher courses in 
these subjects do not sufficiently test the pupil's previous 
knowledge. 



28 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Though it is again urged that pupils always be examined 
for any such advanced classes and thus obtain unconditional 
credit at once, the certificates from schools well known to be 
of entirely equivalent standard will be accepted conditionally 
in other subjects, provided the student continues the same 
studies in the higher classes after entering St. Mary's and thus 
obtains as many points for work in each study done at St. 
Mary's as the number of points for which she desires certifi- 
cate credit. This conditional credit on certificate will be 
given her unconditionally only after she has obtained credit 
by successful work in the advanced classes. For example, a 
pupil entering M English will be entitled to eight points of 
certificate credit in English conditionally (that is, for the C 
English and D English work). When she has completed 
the work of M English she receives four points for this work 
done at St. Mary's and is at the same time given uncondi- 
tionally four points of the eight points already credited con- 
ditionally on certificate. When she completes the work of 
N English she in like manner receives four points for that 
work and the other four points already credited conditionally 
on certificate are then credited unconditionally, thus making 
1 6 points in English for the two years' work — eight points for 
work done at the school and eight points for the previous 
work credited to her and which was accepted conditionally. 

Blanks for these certificates will be sent upon application. 
A candidate for admission may be accepted in some subjects 
or in parts of subjects and not in all. 

Certificate* 

Certificates when accepted are credited conditionally at 
their face value. The pupil is placed in the class which her 
certificate gives her the right to enter. If she does satis- 
factory work during the first month, she is given regular 
standing in the class; if at the end of the first month her work 
has proved unsatisfactory, she is either required to enter the 
next lower class or may be given a trial for one month more. 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 29 

examinations 

All candidates for admission who can not show the proper 
certificates for preparatory work, will be examined to deter- 
mine their proper classification. 

Specimen examination questions in any subject will be 
furnished on request; and principals who are preparing 
pupils for St. Mary's will be furnished the regular examina- 
tion papers at the regular times, in January and May, if 
desired. 

Certificates are urgently desired in all cases, whether the 
candidate is to be examined or not. 

Regular Course 

All pupils are advised to take a regular prescribed course 
and to keep to it; a changing about from one subject to an- 
other, with no definite aim in view, is unsatisfactory alike to 
pupil, parent and the School. Parents are urged to advise 
with the Rector as to a course for their daughters and help in 
this matter is given by him or his representatives to the pupil 
throughout her course. 

Special Courses 

Those who desire to take academic work while specializing 
in the Departments of Music, Art, Expression or Business, 
are permitted to do so and are assigned to such classes in the 
Academic Department as suit their purpose and preparation. 
The number of hours of academic work along with the time 
spent on the specialties should be sufficient to keep the pupil 
well occupied. 

Classification 

In order to graduate and receive the School diploma a 
pupil must receive credit for 60 points in certain specific 
subjects. Even though a student does not expect to grad- 
uate she is classified as Freshman, Sophomore, etc., accord- 
ing to the amount of work done in the College course. The 
classification is arranged as follows: 



30 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

A student admitted to the Freshman Class with condition 
in not more than one subject is ranked as a Conditioned 
Freshman. 

If admitted without condition she is ranked as a Freshman. 

A student with 15 points of unconditional credit is ra nked 
as a Sophomore. 

A student with 30 points of unconditional credit is ranked 
as a Junior. 

A student with 42 points of unconditional credit is ranked 
as a Senior, provided that she takes that year with the ap- 
proval of the School sufficient points counting toward her 
graduation to make the 60 points necessary. 

A pupil entitled to be ranked in any way with a given class 
under the above conditions must also take work sufficient to 
give her the prospect of obtaining enough points during the 
year to entitle her to enter the next higher class the following 
year. 

(^rabuatton 

The course leading to graduation from the College is out- 
lined later in stating the work of each year. The course is 
closely prescribed during the first two years (through the 
Sophomore year). In the last two years the pupil is allowed 
a broad choice of electives. 

The requirements for graduation may be briefly summed 
up as follows: 

(1) The candidate must have been a pupil in the depart- 
ment during at least one entire school year. 

(2) The candidate must have obtained credit for all the 
required courses of the four years of the College and sufficient 
additional credit to make at least 60 points. 

(3) The candidate must have earned at least the amount 
of credit specified below, in the subjects indicated: 

English: 12 points. 

Mathematics: 5 points. 

History: 6 points. 

Science: 4 points. 

Philosophy: 6 points. 

Foreign Languages (Latin, French, or German in any 

combination) : 15 points. 
Total: J+8 points. 



St. Maky's School Bulletin. 31 

(4) Not more than 20 points will be counted for class work 
in any one year; not more than 15 points will be counted alto- 
gether in any one subject (Latin, French and German being 
considered as separate subjects); and not more than 12 points 
will be counted for technical work done in the Departments 
of Music, Art and Elocution. 

(5) The candidate must have made up satisfactorily any 
and all work, in which she may have been "conditioned" at 
least one-half year before the date at which she wishes to graduate. 

(6) The candidate must have made formal written announce- 
ment of her candidacy for graduation during the first quarter 
of the year in which the diploma is to be awarded; and her 
candidacy must have been then passed upon favorably by the 
Rector. 

(7) The candidate must have satisfactorily completed all 
"general courses" which may have been prescribed; must have 
maintained a satisfactory deportment; and must have borne 
herself in such a way as a pupil as would warrant the authorities 
in giving her the mark of the school's approval. 

gtoarte 

The St. Mary's Diploma is awarded a pupil who has suc- 
cessfully completed the full academic course required for 
graduation as indicated above. 

An Academic Certificate is awarded to pupils who 
receive a Certificate or Diploma in Music or Art, on the con- 
ditions laid down for graduation from the College, except 
that 

(1) The minimum number of points of academic credit re- 
quired will be 35 points, instead of 60 points. 

(2) These points will be counted for any strictly academic 
work in the College. 

(3) No technical or theoretical work in Music or Art will 
be credited toward these 35 points. 

No honors will be awarded and no certificates of dismissal 
to other institutions will be given, unless all bills have been 
satisfactorily settled. 

Stoarbs in (Dtfjer Departments 
For academic requirements for certificates or diplomas in 
Music or Art, see under those departments. 



32 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Commencement honors! 

Honors at graduation are based on the work of the last 
two years, the true college years. 

The Valedictorian has the first honor; the Saluta- 
TORiAN has the second honor. The Essayist is chosen on 
the basis of the final essays submitted. 

GDfje Honor 3RoH 

The highest general award of merit, open to all members 
of the School, is the Honor Roll, announced at Commence- 
ment. The requirements are: 

(1) The pupil must have been in attendance the entire ses- 
sion and have been absent from no duty at any time during 
the session without the full consent of the Rector, and without 
lawful excuse. 

(2) She must have had during the year a full regular course 
of study or its equivalent, and must have carried this work to 
successful completion, taking all required examinations and ob- 
taining a mark for the year in each subject of at least 75 per 
cent. 

(3) She must have maintained an average of "Very Good," 
(90 per cent) or better, in her studies. 

(4) She must have made a record of "Excellent" (less than 
two demerits) in Deportment, in Industry, and in Punctuaitly. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory bearing 
in the affairs of her school life during the year. 

W\)t JJilesi iflebal 

The Niles Medal for General Excellence was insti- 
tuted by Rev. Charles Martin Niles, D.D., in 1906. It is 
awarded to the pupil who has made the best record in scholar- 
ship and deportment during the session. 

The medal is awarded to the same pupil only once. 

The requirements for eligibility are: 

(1) The pupil must have taken throughout the year at least 
"15 points" of regular work; and have satisfactorily completed 
this work, passing all required examinations. 

(2) The pupil must have been "Excellent" in Deportment. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 33 

(3) The pupil must have taken all regular general courses 
assigned and have done satisfactory work in them. 

(4) The pupil must be a regular student of the College Depart- 
ment. 

3Hje JSiSfjop barker ?Botanp -prije 

The Bishop Parker Botany Prize, given by the Rt. 
Rev. Edward M. Parker, Bishop Coadjutor of New Hamp- 
shire, is awarded annually to that pupil who in accordance 
with certain published conditions does the best work in the 
preparation of an herbarium. 

The Muse Prizes — copies of the annual Muse — are 
presented by the Managers of the Muse to the students who 
by their written or artistic contributions have done the most 
to help the annual and monthly Muse during the current year. 

(general H>tatemente 

&fje fHinimum of gUabemtc SUora JUqutreb for Certificates 

Candidates for Certificates in the Music Department, the 
Art Department, the Elocution Department, or in Domestic 
Science, must have completed the following minimum of 
academic work. This work must have been done at St. 
Mary's, or be credited by certificate or examination in 
accordance with the regular rules for credits. 

(1) The A and B Courses in English, History, Mathematics, 
Science, and in either Latin or French or German. 

(2) The C and D Courses in English and in History. 

(3) Such other C and D Courses as will amount to "eight 
points" of Academic credit. 

For example: 

Mathematics C and D; 
or Latin C and D; 

or French C and D and German C and D; 
or Mathematics C and Science C and D; 
or Latin C and French C and D, etc. 
5 



34 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Ki}t Amount of Certificate Crebit 

Certificates from other schools are accepted provisionally 
at their face value. No permanent credit is given until the 
pupil has proved the quality of past work by present work. 

Credit is allowed for no subject unless the pupil takes a 
higher course in that subject at St. Mary's; and the amount 
of credit allowed by certificate in any subject can not exceed 
the amount of credit earned afterward by the pupil in that 
subject at St. Mary's. 

A pupil, if she is admitted on certificate to a D course, receives 
no credit toward graduation for the C Course until after she 
has done a half-year's work successfully. The D Courses in 
English, French, German and Mathematics have as a prerequisite 
the completion of the C Course. Pupils admitted unconditioned 
to these D Courses will therefore be given graduation credit for 
the C Courses when they have finished the D Course (except for 
Math. C, 1.) 

Pupils will be admitted to M and N Courses only by exami- 
nation or after having finished the lower courses required. 

Certificates will not be accepted for admission to the work 
of M and N Courses. 

glcabemic Crebit for SaBorfe in ©tfjer ^Departments 

The theoretical work in Music is credited as follows: 

Harmony I and II: 1 point each. 
Music History I and II: 1 point each. 

To obtain this credit the pupil must attain the passing 
mark (75 per cent) on recitations and examinations. 

The completion at St. Mary's of the technical work in the 
Freshman, Sophomore, Junior or Senior classes in Music 
entitles the pupil to 3 points of academic credit for the work 
of each class, and a like credit is offered in the Departments 
of Art and Elocution. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 35 



The Regular Academic Course 

The letter given with each course is the name of the course 
(as English A, French C). The number following the letter 
gives in the Preparatory Department the number of periods 
of recitation weekly. 

In the College work a number after the Easter term only indicates 
the number of points for both terms' work, and that no credit is 
given for less than the work of the whole year; while a number 
after each term indicates the number of points for such term 
and that the course for that term is a separate one for which 
credit is given separately. Ordinarily the number of points 
for a year's course is the same as the number of hours of weekly 
recitation; for a term's course one-half the number of hours of 
weekly recitation. 

dipper preparatory ^KHork 

All the subjects are required in the regular course. 
For description, see pages 40-54. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Advent Term. Easter Term. 

English: Grammar, A, 5. English: Grammar, A, 5. 

History: English, A, 5. History: American, A, 5. 

Mathematics: Algebra, A, 5. Mathematics: Arithmetic, A, 5. 

Latin: First Book, A, 5. Latin: First Book, A, 5. 

Science: General, A, 3. Science: Geography, A, 3. 

All pupils are also required to take Bible Study, Drawing, Reading, and 
Physical Culture. 
French A may also be taken. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Advent Term. Easter Term. 

English: Elem. Rhetoric, B, 5. English: Elem. Rhetoric, B, 5. 

History: Greek, B, 4. History: Roman, B, 4. 

Mathematics: Algebra, B, 5. Mathematics: Algebra, B, 5. 

Latin: Caesar, B, 4. Latin: Caesar, B, 4. 

Science: Physical Geography, Science: Physiology, B, 3. 
B, 3. 

All pupils are also required to take Bible Study, Drawing, Reading, and 
Physical Culture. 
French B or German B may also be taken. 



36 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Kf)t College OTorfc 

It should be remembered that 60 points of credit are required 
for graduation from the College, and that 48 points of this 60 
points are in required subjects as follows: (See also page 30.) 

English : 12 points (that is Courses C and D ; and either M or N). 

History: 6 points (that is three of the four Courses, C, D, M, N). 

Mathematics: 5 points (that is Course C). 

Science: 4 points (that is Courses C and D). 

Philosophy : 6 points (that is Courses M and N) . 

Foreign Languages: 15 points (in any combination), for 
example, 

Latin C, D, M, N, and French or German C; 
or Latin C, D, and French or German C, D, M; 
or French C, D, M, N, and German C, D, M, or vice versa; 
or Latin C, D, and French C, D, and German C, D. 

Total: 48 points required. 

The other 12 points are entirely elective. Music or Art may 
count S points each year or 12 points in all, or the 12 points may 
be elected from any C, D, M, or N Course in the College. 

Pedagogy M, N, (2) or Domestic Science C or D, (3) may be 
elected and counted for credit. 

A member of any College class must take the required courses of 
that class and enough elective courses to make altogether fifteen points 
of credit for the year. 

The courses starred *, are necessary for graduation; and of the courses 
starred and bracketed ( * ) in English, M or N is required, and in History three 
of the four courses must be taken. 

Jfresljmart l?ear. 

Advent Term. Easter Term. 

*English: Rhetoric, C. *English: Literature, C, 4. 

*Mathematics: Algebra, C, 2. *Mathematics: Geometry, C, 3. 
(*)History: English, C, 2. *Science: Botany, C, 2. 

Latin: Cicero, C. Latin: Cicero, C, 4. 

French: Grammar, C. French: Readings, C, 2. 

German: Grammar, C. German: Readings, C, 2. 

At least one foreign language is required. 

An hour of Bible Study and a period each of Spelling and 
Reading weekly is required. 

The regular course in Music or Art may be taken as an addi- 
tional subject for credit (3 points). 

Not less than 16 points nor more than 20 points should be 
taken. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 



37 



Advent Term. 

*English: Studies, D. 
^Science: Chemistry, D, 2. 

Mathematics: Geom., D, 1J4- 

Latin: Virgil, D. 

French: Modern, D. 

German: Modern, D. 



£§>opfjomore gear 

Easter Term. 
*English: American Lit., D, 4. 
(*)History: American, D, 2. 
Mathematics: Trig., D, 1}^. 
Latin, Virgil, D, 4. 
French: Modern, D, 2. 
German: Modern, D, 2. 



The foreign language elected in the Freshman Year should be 
continued and enough foreign language must be elected to count 
at least 4 points. 

An hour each of Bible Study and Current History and a period 
of Spelling weekly is required. 

The regular course in Music or Art may be taken as a subject 
for credit (3 points). 

junior gear 



Advent Term. 
(*)English: Poetics, M, 2. 
(*) History: Middle Ages, M. 
*Philosophy: Civics, M, 1. 
Mathematics: Analytics, M. 
Latin: Historians, M. 
French: Modern, M. 
German: Modern, M. 



Easter Term. 
(*)English: Essayists, M, 2. 
(*)History: Middle Ages, M, 2. 
* Philosophy : Economics, M, 1. 
Mathematics : Analytics, M,3. 
Latin: Poets, M, 3. 
French: Modern, M, 3. 
German: Modern, M, 3. 



Enough work in foreign language must be elected to count 
at least 4 points. 

An hour each of Bible Study and Current History is required. 

The regular course in Music or Art may be taken as a subject 
for credit (3 points). 

H>enior gear 
Advent Term. Easter Term. 

(*)English: Hist. Lang., N,2. (*)English: Shakespeare, N, 2. 
(*)History: Modern, N. (*)History: Modern, N, 2. 

*Philosophy: Ethics, N, 1. *Philosophy: Evidences, N, 1. 

*Philosophy: Psychology, N. *Philosophy, Psychology, N, 2. 



Latin: Philosophy, N. 
French: Classics, N. 
German: Classics, N. 
Mathematics: Calculus, N. 



Latin: Drama, N, 3. 
French: Classics, N, 3. 
German: Classics, N, 3. 
Mathematics: Calculus, N, 3. 



Enough foreign language must be taken to complete at least 
the 15 points required for graduation. 



38 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

An hour each of Bible Study and Current History is required. 

English N is required unless 12 points have already been 
earned in English. 

History N is required unless 6 points have already been 
earned in History. 

The regular course in Music or Art may be taken as a subject 
for credit (3 points). 

Note. — The Theoretical courses in Music and Art may be 
counted as elective in any college class, and the technical work 
of the proper grade in either Music. Art, or Elocution may be 
counted in any college class as an elective for three points. 
But only one subject may be so counted. 

Failure in the Bible course for any year will deprive the pupil 
of one of the points gained in other subjects. 

General Courses 

The theory of St. Mary's being that a well-rounded edu- 
cation results in a developing of the best type of Christian 
womanhood, certain general courses as outlined below have 
been prescribed for all pupils. 

3keaoing 

Believing that at the present day too little attention is 
paid to the art of clear, forceful, intelligent reading, St. 
Mary's requires all her pupils, except Juniors and Seniors, 
to take practical training to this end. 

Impelling anb Composition 

An hour each week is devoted to training the same pupils 
in overcoming defects in spelling, and in letter writing. 

Current gtetorp 

Pupils of the Senior, Junior and Sophomore years meet 
once a week for the discussion of current topics, current lit- 
erature, etc. This exercise is intended to lead to a discrim- 
inating reading of current publications and to improve the 
powers of conversation. 



St. Maey's School Bulletin. 39 

J2ormal instruction 

Pupils who announce their intention at the beginning of the 
Senior year to devote themselves to teaching after their grad- 
uation, will be given special assistance to this end, both in 
instruction and in practice. 

iJStble &tubp 

All pupils are required to take the prescribed course in 
Bible Study, which is given one hour a week. It is intended 
to afford a knowledge of the English Bible, of the history and 
literature of the Biblical books, and of their contents, and 
is not dogmatic in its teachings. 

ijJljpsical Culture 

All pupils not excused on the ground of health are required 
to take the required exercises in physical culture, which are 
thoroughly practical and are intended to train the pupils in 
the art of managing their bodies, in standing, walking, using 
their limbs, breathing, and the like. The exercise is most 
wholesome and the training imparts to the pupils sugges- 
tions about their health which will be most useful to them 
throughout life. 



40 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 



The Courses in Detail 



General Statements; 

The courses are here lettered systematically. It is impor- 
tant to note and consider the letter of the course in deter- 
mining credits or planning a pupil's work. 

I "O" Courses are preliminary. Where a pupil has not had 
sufficient previous preparation for the regular courses, she will 
be required to take this "O" work before going on into "A." 

"A" Courses are the lowest regular courses, and are taken 
in the Third Year of the Preparatory school. 

"B" Courses are taken in the Fourth Year (last year) of the 
Preparatory School. 

The "A" and "B" Courses in English, History, Mathematics, 
and Sceince and one foreign language (or their equivalents), must 
have been finished satisfactorily by a pupil before she is eligible for 
admission to the College. 

"C" and "D" Courses are taken ordinarily in the Freshman 
and Sophomore years. In English, Mathematics, Latin, French, 
and German, the "C" Course must be taken before the pupil 
can enter the "D" Course. 

"M" and "N" Courses are ordinarily taken in the Junior or 
Senior years. Pupils are not eligible to take these courses 
until they have finished the "C" and "D" Courses of the same 
subjects. (See special exceptions before each subject.) 

"X" Courses are special courses not counting toward gradu- 
ation. 

^tstorp 

Mr. Stone. Miss Schenck. 

Courses O, A and B are Preparatory, and the knowledge ob- 
tained in them is required before a pupil can enter the College. 
Courses C, D, M, and N are College courses. 

Candidates for graduation must take at least 6 points in 
History. 

Candidates for certificates must take at least Courses C and D. 

Course 0. — 5 half-hours a week. American History. A 
grammar school course in United States History, impressing 
the leading facts and great names. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 41 

Course A. — 5 half -hours a week. (1) English History. 
(2) American History. A constant aim of this course will 
be to impress the pupil so thoroughly with the leading facts 
of English and American history that she will have a solid 
framework to be built upon later in her more advanced studies 
in History, English, and Literature. 

Coman & Kendall, Short History of England; Thompson, 
History of the United States. 

Course B. — 4 hours a week. Ancient History. (1) First 
half-year: Greece; (2) Second half-year: Rome. The course 
in Ancient History makes a thorough study of the ancient 
world. The pupil is sufficiently drilled in map work to have 
a working knowledge of the ancient world; the influence of 
some of the great men is emphasized by papers based on out- 
side reading, for instance: Plutarch's Lives. Selections from 
Homer are read in class. 

West, Ancient World; McKinley, Study Outline in Greek and 
Roman History. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week, first half-year. (2 points.) 
English History. In this course emphasis is laid on the 
development of constitutional government particularly with 
its bearing on United States History. The Ivanhoe Note 
Books are used for map work. From time to time papers are 
required on important events and great men. 

Higginson & Channing, English History for Americans. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week, second half-year. (2 points.) 
American History. In U. S. History the text-book gives a 
clear and fair treatment of the causes leading to our war with 
Great Britain; to the War Between the States; and of present 
day questions, political, social and economic. 

Adams and Trent, History of United States. 

Course M. — 2 hours a week. (2 points.) Medieval His- 
tory. In Medieval and Modern History the pupil is given a 
clear view of the development of feudalism; of monarchic 



42 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

states; of the history of the Christian Church; of the Refor- 
mation; of the growth of democracy, and of the great political, 
social and religious questions of the present day, with some 
special reference work in the library. 

West, Modern History; Ivanhoe Note-Book, Part IV. 

Course N. — 2 hours a week (2 points.) Modern History. 
A continuation of Course M. Same methods. 

Robertson and Beard, The Development of Modern Europe, 
Vol. II. 

tEfje Cnglisi) Language anb Literature 

Mr. Stone. Miss Shattuck. Miss Hayward. 

All pupils at entrance are required to stand a written test 
to determine general knowledge of written English. 

Courses 0, A, and B are Preparatory and the knowledge 
obtained in them is required before a pupil can enter a higher 
course. 

Candidates for graduation must take Courses C and D and 
at least If. points from Courses M and N. 

Candidates for certificates must take Courses C and D. 

Course 0. — (Preliminary.) 5 half -hours a week. (1) 
Grammar. Text -book: Emerson & Bender, Modern English, 
(Book Two); Lessons in English Grammar. (2) Reading of 
myths (Guerber's stories), legends, other stories and poems; 
memorizing of short poems. 

Course A. — 5 hours a week. ( 1 ) Grammar and Composi- 
tion. Text-book: Buehler, Modern Grammar. (2) Liter- 
ature: Longfellow's Evangeline or Courtship of Miles Slandish; 
Irving's Sketch Book; Hawthorne's short stories; Bryant's 
poems; Whittier's Snow Bound; Selections from Burroughs 
and Warner; Stevenson's Treasure Island; memorizing of 
poems. 

Course B. — 5 hours a week. (1) Grammar. Review of 
English grammar; analysis and parsing of more difficult 
constructions, with special study of verb-phrases and verbals. 
(2) Composition: Study of principles of composition; narra- 
tive, descriptive, expository themes; reproductions; letter 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 43 

writing; use of models. (3) Literature: Scott's Ivanhoe and 
Lady of the Lake; George Eliot's Silas Marner; short poems 
of Tennyson; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; As You Lihfi It. 

Hitchcock, Exercises in English Composition. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) (1) Rhetoric 
and Composition: Frequent oral and written exercises lead- 
ing to correctness in use of words, structure of sentences, 
and ability to put into practice general principles of compo- 
sition. (2) English Literature: Study of a history of English 
literature; careful study of a few classics; reading of narra- 
tive and descriptive works in prose and poetry with class 
discussion and oral and written reports on reading done. 

(1) Baldwin, Writing and Speaking; (2) Tappan, England's 
Literature; Palgrave's Golden Treasury; Julius Caesar or Merchant 
of Venice; selected poems of Goldsmith, Gray, Coleridge, Byron; 
Roger de Coverley Papers; Tale of Two Cities. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Prerequisite; 
Course C. (1) Rhetoric and Composition: Especial atten- 
tion to paragraph and to elements of style, clearness, force, 
life, smoothness; themes of various types weekly or twice a 
week; brief study of argumentation. (2) Literature: Study 
of various literary types; in second half-year, outline history 
of American Literature with parallel reading. 

(1) Espenshade's Essentials of Composition and Rhetoric; (2) 
Gaskell's Cranford; Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Shakespeare's 
Macbeth; Milton's Comus; Burke's Speech on Conciliation; 
Poe's Poems and Tales; Emerson's Essays; Newcomer's or Bates' 
American Literature. 

Course Ml. — 4 hours a week, first half-year. (2 points.) 
Prerequisite: Course D. Poetry of nineteenth century; spe- 
cial study of Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson. 

Themes, imaginative and critical. 

Saintsbury's History of Nineteenth Century Literature; selected 
poems; Globe edition of Tennyson's poems. 

Course M2. — 4 hours a week, second half-year. (2 points.) 
Prerequisite: Course D. Prose writers of the nineteenth 
century; special study of Lamb, Carlyle, Ruskin. 



44 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 

Themes, expository and argumentative. 

Saintsbury's History of Nineteenth Century Literature; one or 
two novels; selected essays of the writers named. 

Course N1. — 4 hours a week, first half-year. (2 points.) 
Prerequisite: Course D. (1) History of the English Lan- 
guage, with illustrative reading. Essay writing. (2) Brown- 
ing's shorter poems. 

Lounsbury, History of the English Language; Chaucer, Pro- 
logue and Knight's Tale; Burton's Browning. 

Course N2. — 4 hours a week, second half-year. (2 points.) 
Prerequisite: Course D. The English Drama, Shakespeare. 
Rise of the drama studied by means of lectures and outside 
reading; careful study of two or three of Shakespeare's plays, 
with reading of others; essay writing. 

The Arden Edition of Shakespeare's works; Dowden's Shake- 
speare Primer. 

Jforetgn Hanguageg 

Candidates for graduation must take at least 15 points in 
foreign languages. 

Jfrenrf) 

Mlle. Rudnicka. 

Course A. — (Preliminary.) 5 half-hours a week. A 
course for young children. The study of the language begun 
without a text-book. Careful drill in pronunciation. The 
learning of the names of objects and the forming of sentences. 
Reading in Guerber, Contes et Legendes I. 

Course B. — (Preliminary.) 5 half-hours a week. The 
study of the language begun. Careful drill in pronunciation. 
Reading, grammar, dictation, conversation. 

Guerber, Contes et Legendes I; Brooks, Chardenal, Complete 
French Course; Super, French Reader. 

Course C. — 5 half-hours a week. (2 points.) Prerequi- 
site: French B. Elementary French I. Systematic study 
of the language. Grammar, reading, conversation. Careful 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 45 

drill in pronunciation; the rudiments of grammar (inflection, 
use of personal pronouns, common adverbs, prepositions, and 
conjunctions; order of words; elementary rules of syntax); 
the reading of from 1 00 to 1 75 duodecimo pages of graduated 
texts, with constant practice in translating into French easy 
variations of the sentences read (the teacher giving the 
English), and in reproducing from memory sentences pre- 
viously read; writing French from dictation. 

Brooks, Chardenal, Complete French Course; Fontaine, Livre 
de Lecture et de Conversation; Guerber, Contes et Legendes II; 
Halevy, L'Abbe Constantin; etc. 

Course D.- — 5 half -hours a week. (2 points.) Elementary 
French II. Continuation of previous work; reading of from 
250 to 400 pages of easy modern prose in the form of stories, 
plays, or historical or biographical sketches; constant prac- 
tice, as in the preceding year, in translating into French easy 
variations upon the text read; frequent abstracts, sometimes 
oral and sometimes written, of portions of the text already 
read; writing French from dictation; continued drill upon the 
rudiments of grammar, with constant application in the 
construction of sentences: mastery of the forms and use of 
pronouns, pronominal adjectives, of all but the rare irregular 
verb forms, and of the simpler uses of the conditional and 
subjunctive. 

Fraser and Squair, Abridged French Grammar; Labiche and 
Martin, Le Voyage de M. Perrichon; Lamartine, Jeanne d'Arc; 
La Brete, Mon Oncle et Mon Cure; Merimee, Colomba; or equiv- 
alents. 

Course M. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Intermediate 
French. The reading of from 300 to 500 pages of standard 
French of a grade less simple than in Course D, a portion of 
it in the dramatic form; constant practice in giving French 
paraphrases, abstracts or reproductions from memory of 
selected portions of the matter read; the completion of a 
standard grammar; writing from dictation; study of idioms. 

Fraser and Squair, Abridged French Grammar; Bouvet, French 



46 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Syntax and Composition; Loti, Pecheur d'Islande; Sand, La Mare 
au Diable; Daudet, Lettres de mon Moulin; Bowen, Modern 
French Lyrics; and equivalents. 

Course N. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Advanced 
French. The rapid reading of from 300 to 500 pages of 
French poetry and drama, classical and modern, only diffi- 
cult passages being explained in class; writing of numer- 
ous short themes in French; study of syntax; history of 
French Literature; idioms. 

Duval, Histoire de la Literature francaise; Hugo, Ruy Bias; 
Corneille's dramas; Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac; Renan's 
Souvenirs d'enfance et de jeunesse; Moliere's plays; or equivalents. 

German 

Mr. Stone. Miss Ricks. 

The courses in German are exactly parallel to the corre- 
sponding courses in French. The amount of work required 
in each course and the methods are approximately the same. 

Course B. — (Preliminary). 5 half -hours a week. Study 
of the language begun. 

Collar, First Year German; Zschokke's Der Zerbrochene Krug. 

Course C. — 5 half -hours a week. (2 points.) Prerequisite: 
German B. Elementary German I. 

Joynes-Meissner, German Grammar; Storm's Immensee; 
Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche; Heyse's L'Arrabiata; selected 
poetry. 

Course D. — 5 half -hours a week. (2 points.) Element- 
ary German II. Continuation of Course C. 

Joynes-Meissner, German Grammar (completed); Benedix' 
Der Prozess; Arnold's Fritz auf Ferien; Riehl's Der Fluch der 
Schonheit; Schiller's Wilhelm Tell; selected poetry. 

Course M. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Intermediate 
German. 

Freytag's Die Journalisten; Baumbach's Der Schwiegersohn; 
Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm; Scheffel's Der Trompeter von 
Sakkingen; Uhland's poems. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 47 

Course N. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Advanced 
German. 

Holzwarth, German Literature, Land and People; Goethe's Her- 
mann und Dorothea; Lessing's Nathan der Weise; Schiller's Wal- 
lenstein; Scheffel's Ekkehard. 

latin 

Miss TJrquhart. 
Pupils well grounded in English may complete Courses O 
and A in a single session. 

Course 0. — 5 half-hours a week. (Preliminary Course.) 
Study of the simple inflectional forms; marking of quanti- 
ties; reading aloud; translation of sentences from Latin into 
English, and from English into Latin; translation at hearing; 
easy connected Latin and English. 

Bennett, First Year Latin; Kirtland, Ritchie, Fabulce Faciles 
(Perseus, Hercules). 

Course A. — 5 half-hours a week. Elementary Latin I. 
Review and continuation of work of Course 0; thorough 
review of forms with use of note-book; composition and 
derivation of words; systematic study of syntax of cases and 
verb. 

Bennett, First Year Latin (rapidly reviewed); Ritchie's 
Fabulce, (completed) ; Rolf e, Viri Romas; Bennett, Latin Grammar. 

Course B. — 5 half-hours a week. Elementary Latin II. 
Caesar. Continuation of preceding work; study of the 
structure of sentences in general, and particularly of the 
relative and conditional sentence, indirect discourse, and 
the subjunctive; sight translation; military antiquities. 

Bennett, Caesar (Books I-IV); Bennett, Latin Grammar; 
Bennett, Latin Writer. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Elementary 
Latin III. — Cicero; continued systematic study of grammar 
and composition; study of Roman political institutions; 
short passages memorized: prose and poetry at sight. 

Bennett, Cicero (four orations against Catiline, Archias, 
Manilian Law) ; Bennett, New Latin Composition. 



48 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Elementary 
Latin IV. Virgil; continuation of preceding courses; prosody 
(accent, general versification, dactylic hexameter). 

Bennett's Virgil's Mneid (Books I-VI); Bennett, Latin Gram- 
mar; Bennett, New Latin Composition. 

Course M. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Intermediate 
Latin I. The public and private life of the Romans as told 
in the Latin. Literature. Prose composition. Recita- 
tion; occasional explanatory lectures; parallel reading. (1) 
First half-year: The Roman Historians; (2) Second half- 
year: The Roman Poets. 

(1) Melhuish, Cape, Livy (Books XXI, XXII); Allen, Tacitus' 
Germania; (2) Page, Horace's Odes (Books I, II) ; Baker, Horace's 
Satires and Epistles (selected); (1, 2) Gildersleeve-Lodge, Latin 
Composition; Peck and Arrowsmith, Roman Life in Prose and 
Verse; Wilkins, Roman Antiquities. 

Course N. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Intermediate 
Latin II. Continuation of Course M. (1) First half-year: 
Roman Philosophy; (2) Second half-year: Roman Drama. 

(1) Schuckburgh, Cicero's de Senectute and de Amicitia; (2) 
Elmer, Terence's Phormio; (1, 2) Gildersleeve-Lodge, Latin 
Composition; Peck and Arrowsmith, Roman Life in Prose and 
Verse. 

<Sreefe 

Mr. Lay. 

Greek and Latin are considered as equivalents in all courses. 

Greek may be substituted for Latin, in whole or in part. 
Greek courses are offered by the school when there is a suf- 
ficient number of pupils to justify it. 

Course B. — 5 half-hours a week. Elementary Greek I. 
First year Greek. Special attention to the mastery of forms 
and principal constructions. 

Ball, Elementary Greek Book; Macmillan, Greek Reader. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Elementary 
Greek II. Grammar; reading; composition; sight-reading. 
Methods as in Latin. 

Goodwin, Greek Grammar; Goodwin, Xenophon's Anabasis 
(four books) ; Jones, Greek Prose Composition. 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 49 

Course D. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Elementary 
Greek III. Continuation of Course C. 

Goodwin, Greek Grammar; Seymour, Homer's Iliad (4,000 
lines); Daniell, Greek Prose Lessons. 

JUatfjemattcs; 

Miss Ricks. 
Candidates for graduation must at least have credit for C 
Mathematics. 
Candidates for certificates must have at least finished Course B. 

Course A. — 5 periods a week. (1) Arithmetic. A thor- 
ough review of the fundamental principles. Special atten- 
tion to common and decimal fractions, and percentage and 
its applications. (2) Algebra. The study of elementary 
Algebra, as laid down in an elementary text-book. 

(1) Milne, Standard Arithmetic; (2) Slaught and Lennes, 
First Principles of Algebra (to page 276). 

Course X. — 5 periods a week. Complete Arithmetic. 
Commercial problems; review of common and decimal 
fractions; metric system; mental arithmetic; percentage and 
the applications; mensuration. Not counted for graduation. 
Intended especially for Business pupils. 

Moore and Miner, Practical Business Arithmetic. 

Course B. — 5 periods a week. Algebra through Quad- 
ratics. The four fundamental operations: factoring; frac- 
tions; complex fractions; linear equations (numerical and 
literal, containing one or more unknown quantities); problems 
depending on linear equations; radicals (square root and cube 
root of polynomials and numbers); exponents (fractional 
and negative); quadratic equations (numerical and literal). 

Slaught and Lennes, First Principles of Algebra (pp. 134-397). 

Course C. — 5 hours a week. Prerequisite: Course B. 
(1) First half-year: Algebra, from Quadratics. (2 points.) 
Quadratic equations with one or more unknown quantities; 
problems depending on quadratic equations in quadratic 

7 



50 St. Maey's School Bulletin. 

form; the binominal theorem for positive integral exponents; 
ratio and proportion; arithmetical and geometrical progres- 
sions; numerous practical problems throughout. (2) Second 
half-year: Plane Geometry (complete). (3 points.) The 
usual theorems and constructions; the solution of numerous 
original exercises, including loci problems; applications to 
the mensuration of lines and plane surfaces. 

(1) Slaught and Lennes, First Principles of Algebra (from page 
365); (2) Wentworth-Smith, Plane Geometry. 

Course D. — 3 hours a week. Prerequisite: Course C. 
(1) First half-year: Solid Geometry. (/ 1-2 points.) The 
usual theorems and constructions; the solution of numerous 
original exercises, including loci problems; applications to 
the mensuration of surfaces and solids. (2) Second half- 
year: Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. (/ 1-2 points.) 
Definitions and relations of the six trigonometric functions as 
ratios ; circular measurement of angles, proofs of the principal 
formulas and the transformation of trigonometric expressions 
by the formulas; solution of trigonometric equations of a 
simple character; theory and use of logarithms; solutions of 
right and oblique triangles, and practical applications, 
including the solution of right spherical triangles. 

(1) Wells, Essentials of Geometry (or) Wentworth, Solid 
Geometry (Revised); (2) Wells, Complete Trigonometry. 

Course M. — 3 hours a week. Prerequisite: Course D. 
(1) First half-year; Advanced Algebra. (/ 1-2 points.) Per- 
mutations and combinations; complex numbers; determi- 
nants; undetermined coefficients; numerical equations of 
higher degree, logarithmic and exponential equations, and 
the theory of equations necessary to their treatment (Des- 
cartes' rule of signs; Horner's method). (2) Second half- 
year: Analytical Geometry. (/ 1-2 points.) Introduction 
to the analytical geometry of the plane and of space. Proof 
of formulas; original examples. 

Rlggs, Analytic Geometry. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 51 

Course N. — 3 hours a week. Prerequisite: Course M. 
Calculus. (3 points.) Elementary course in the differential 
and integral calculus. 

Osborne, Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Natural Science 

Mr. Crtjikshank. 

Candidates for graduation must take at St. Mary's at least 
one biological and one physical science. 

The certificates of candidates for admission to the Freshman 
Class must show clearly the amount of work done in Physical 
Geography and Physiology. Unless enough has been done the 
pupil will be required to take these courses at St. Mary's. 

Courses Ca and Cb are given in alternate years; likewise 
Courses Da and Db. 

M and N Courses are offered when required. 

Course A. — 3 half-hours a week. General Elements of 
Science. A simple general treatment of the elementary 
facts of the various branches of natural science. 

Clark, General Science. 

Course B 1 . — 3 half -hours a week, first half-year. Physical 
Geography. The study of a standard text-book to gain a 
knowledge of the essential principles and of well-selected 
facts illustrating those principles. 

Tarr, Principles of Physical Geography. 

Course B2. — 3 half-hours a week, second half-year. 
Physiology. An elementary study of the human body and 
the laws governing its care. 

Martin, Human Body (Elementary Course). 

Course Ca. — 4 hours a week, second half-year. General 
Zoology. (2 points.) A general study of the principal forms 
of animal life, their structure, development, geographical 
distribution and adaptation, reproduction, etc. Individual 
laboratory work. 

Davenport, Introduction to Zoology. 



52 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Course Cb. — 4 hours (3 hours recitation and demonstra- 
tion and one double hour laboratory practice) a v/eek, second 
half-year. Elementary Botany. (2 points.) The general 
principles of anatomy and morphology, physiology, and 
ecology, and the natural history of the plant groups and 
classification. Individual laboratory work; stress laid upon 
diagrammatically accurate drawing and precise expressive 
description. 

Bailey, Botany. 

Course Da. — 4 hours (2 hours recitation and demonstra- 
tion, 2 double-hours laboratory) a week, first half-year. 
Elementary Chemistry. (2 points.) (a) Individual labora- 
tory work, (b) Instruction by lecture-table demonstration, 
used as a basis for questioning upon the general principles in- 
volved in the pupil's laboratory investigations, (c) The 
study of a standard text -book to the end that a pupil may gain 
a comprehensive and connected view of the most important 
facts and laws in elementary chemistry. 

Brownlee, First Principles of Chemistry and Laboratory Manual; 
Blanchard, Household Chemistry. 

Course Db. — 4 hours (2 hours recitation and demonstra- 
tion, 2 double-hours laboratory work) a week. Elementary 
Physics. A parallel to the course in Chemistry (Course Da) 
in scope and method. 

Carhart and Chute, High School Physics. 

Mr. Lay. Mr. Stone. Mr. Crutkshank. 

The following courses are intended for general all-round 
development and are required of all candidates for graduation 
or certificate. 

Philosophy M 1 . — 2 hours a week, first half-year. (/ point.) 
Civil Government. The leading facts in the develop- 
ment and actual working of our form of government. (Mr. 
Stone.) 

Fiske, Civil Government. 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 53 

Philosophy M2. — 2 hours a week, second half-year. 
(/ point.) Political Economy. The principles of the science 
made clear and interesting by their practical application 
to leading financial and industrial questions of the day. 
(Mr. Stone.) 

Ely and Wicker, Elementary Economics. 

Philosophy Nl. — 2 hours a week, first half-year. 
(/ point.) Ethics. A general outline of the foundation prin- 
ciples, especially as applied to the rules of right living. (Mr. 
Lay.) 

Janet, Elements of Morals. 

Philosophy N2. — 2 hours a week, second half-year. 
(/ point.) Evidences. Christianity portrayed as the per- 
fect system of ethics, and as the most complete evidence of 
itself. (Mr. Lay.) 

Fisher, Manual of Natural Theology; Manual of Christian 
Evidences. 

Psychology N. — 2 hours a week throughout the year. 
(2 points.) A brief introduction to the subject, the text- 
book being supplemented by informal lectures and discussions 
(Mr. Cruikshank.) 

Halleck, Psychology. 

Mr. Lay. 
Pedagogy I (2 periods a week). May be taken for credit 
(2 points). The course in Pedagogy is intended to prepare 
students to become teachers; it is also useful in making them 
better students. There can be no successful teaching 
without the foundation of a good education. Many of the 
methods of any teacher must be a repetition of the methods 
already experienced as a student. No course of special train- 
ing just before the student becomes a teacher can entirely 
make up for any previous lack of thorough scholarship or for 
habituation to faulty methods of class-room management. 



54 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

The study of Pedagogy can only partially restore what has 
been lost, and this it aims to do. 

The chief aims of this course are to learn from the wisdom 
and experience of others what methods have been proven 
the best and to study the psychology of the child, whose 
mental habits are largely forgotten as one becomes more ma- 
ture. The instruction is partly by text-books and partly 
by informal lectures and discussions, thus covering school 
management, class-room management, child psychology and 
other allied subjects, along with a study of the School Law 
of North Carolina and the work of the Teachers' Institutes. 
Actual practice in teaching is also afforded, when desir- 
able. 

Besides other books used for reference the text-books used 
in 191 1 -'12 were Colgrove, The Teacher and the School, and 
Jones, Teaching Children to Study. 

Mr. Lay. Mr. Stone. 

Both Boarding and Day Pupils are required to take a one- 
hour course in Bible Study. On account of the varying 
lengths of time spent at the School by different pupils, the 
variation of the classes which they enter, and the difference in 
knowledge of the subject shown by members of the same col- 
lege class, it is difficult to arrange these courses in as sys- 
tematic a way as might be desired. 

Pupils are therefore assigned to Bible classes partly on the 
ground of age and partly on the ground of the amount of 
work done and the length of time spent at the School. 

There are four divisions pursuing separate courses. These 
courses are designed to cover the Old and New Testament 
and the History of the Bible, in two years; and then to give 
a fuller knowledge of these subjects to those pursuing a longer 
course at the School. 

The instruction is partly by lecture accompanied by the 
use of a uniform edition of the Bible (with references, die- 



St. Maky's School Bulletin. 55 

tionary, maps, etc.), as a text-book; and partly by Instruction 
Books. 

All Boarding Pupils are also required to take a half -hour 
course in one of the Sunday classes. These courses are either 
on the Bible, or the Prayer Book, or Church History. 



56 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 



Department of Music 

Miss Martha A. Dowd Director 

(Eije jfaculrp 

Miss Dowd Piano 

Miss Bacon Piano 

Miss Dorroh Piano 

Miss Graves Piano 

Miss Pitcher Piano 



Mr. Owen Organ 



Mr. Owen In charge of Voice 

Miss Parke Voice 



Miss Parke Violin 



Miss Dowd History of Music, Theory- 
Miss Graves, Miss Bacon Harmony- 
Miss Dorroh, Miss Pitcher Theory 



Mr. Owen Conductor of Chorus and Orchestra 



General Remarks 

Music is both an Art and a Science. As such, the study 
of music is strong to train the mind, to touch the heart, and 
to develop the love of the beautiful. The importance of this 
study is being more and more realized by the schools, and its 
power felt as an element of education. No pains are spared 
in preparing the best courses of study, methods of instruction 
and facilities of work, in this department. Our country 
is becoming more and more a musical nation. 

It is the aim of the Music Department of St. Mary's to 
give students such advantages in technical training, in inter- 
pretative study, and in study of musical form and structure, 
as will enable them not only to develop their own talent, 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 57 

but also to hear, to understand, and to appreciate the beau- 
tiful in all music. 

The department is well equipped with a Miller, a Knabe, 
and a Steinway grand pianos, in addition to twenty-six other 
pianos and three claviers. The practice rooms are separate 
from the other buildings, and there is a beautiful Auditorium 
which seats six hundred and fifty people. 

Organ pupils are instructed on an excellent two-manual 
pipe organ, with twenty stops, and a pedal organ. A Kinetic 
electric blower adds greatly to the convenience of instruction 
and practice. 

Courses of study are offered in Piano, Voice, Organ and 
Violin. 

Concerts ano Recitals; 

For the purpose of acquiring confidence and becoming ac- 
customed to appearing in public, all music pupils are required 
to meet once a week in the Auditorium for an afternoon 
recital. All music pupils take part in these recitals, which 
are open only to members of the School. 

Public recitals are given by the advanced pupils during 
the second term of the school year. 

A series of Faculty recitals is given during the year and 
there are frequent opportunities for hearing music by artists, 
both at St. Mary's and in the city. 

W$t Cfjotr 

No part of the School music is regarded as of more impor- 
tance than the singing in Chapel. The whole student body 
attends the services of the Chapel and takes part in the sing- 
ing. The best voices are chosen for the choir, which leads in 
all the Chapel music, and often renders special selections, 
and for this purpose meets once a week for special practice. 
The students in this way become familiar with chanting, 
with the full choral service, and with the best church music. 



58 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Membership in the choir is voluntary, but pupils admitted 
to the choir are required to attend the weekly rehearsal. 
- The whole school is expected to join in the music of the 
Chapel services, and for this reason a rehearsal of the whole 
school is conducted by the Rector after the service in the 
Chapel on Saturday evenings. At the Sunday evening 
services four-part anthems are frequently rendered, and the 
organ accompaniment is supplemented by an orchestra. 

Zf)t Cfjorus Claste 

The Chorus Class is not confined to the music pupils, 
but is open to all students of the School, without charge. 
This training is of inestimable value, as it gives practice in 
sight reading and makes the pupil acquainted with the best 
choral works of the masters — an education in itself. 

Care is taken not to strain the voices and attention is paid 
to tone color and interpretation. The beauty and effect of 
chorus singing is in the blending of the voices, and to sing 
in chorus it is not necessary to have a good solo voice. 

This branch of the musical training is always enjoyed by 
the students, as everybody likes to sing, and almost every- 
body can sing. 

From the members of the Chorus Class voices are selected 
by the Chorus Conductor for special work in a Glee Club. 

Membership in the Chorus Class and in the Glee Club is 
voluntary. But parents are urged to require this work from 
their daughters, if they are deemed fit for it by the Con- 
ductor. When, however, a pupil is enrolled in either, attend- 
ance at rehearsals is compulsory, until the pupil is excused 
by the Rector at the request of the parent. 

Students of the violin, if sufficiently advanced, are required 
to take part in the Orchestra, which is included in the regular 
work of the department. The Orchestra meets once a week 
in the St. Mary's Auditorium. It is composed of twenty-five 



St. Maey's School Bulletin. 59 

members, students of the school and musicians from the city. 
The Orchestra gives three public recitals during the year, the 
programs being made up of selections from the best orchestral 
writers. The practice in ensemble playing is of great value 
to the students and the work of the Orchestra is a source of 
interest and inspiration to the life of the whole Music Depart- 
ment. 

delation to tfje gicabemtc department 

Studies in the Music Department may be pursued in con- 
nection with full academic work, or may be the main pursuit 
of the student. 

Study in the Music Department is counted to a certain 
extent toward the academic classification of regular pupils 
of the Academic Department. The theoretical studies 
count the same as Academic studies. The technical work is 
given Academic credit in accordance with certain definite 
rules. (See page 62.) Not more than three points credit 
in Music in one year, nor more than twelve points in all can 
be counted toward graduation from the College. 

Pupils specializing in music are, as a rule, expected to take 
academic work along with their musical studies. This is in 
accordance with the prevailing modern ideals in professional 
studies and the pursuit of special branches which require 
some general education in addition to the acquirements of a 
specialist. Pupils from the city may take lessons in music 
only. Certificates in Music are awarded only to pupils who 
have completed the required minimum of academic work. 
(See page 63.) This requirement, which applies also to the 
Art and Elocution Departments, is designed to emphasize 
the fact that the school stands for thoroughness and breadth, 
and will not permit the sacrifice of a well-rounded education 
to over-development in any one direction. 

Clarification in Jlutfic 

Pupils entering the department are examined by the 
Director and assigned to a teacher. 



60 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Thereafter, at the end of the first half-year (or earlier if 
advisable), the pupil's classification in music is decided and 
she is enrolled in the proper class. This determines her degree 
of advancement in her musical studies. 

The examinations for promotion are held semi-annually. 
The marks in music indicate the quality of work, not the 
quantity. Promotion is decided by an examination, which 
shows both that the required amount of work has been done 
and that it has been well done. 

Candidates for promotion or graduation, after satisfying 
the requirements in theoretical attainments, are required to 
perform certain stipulated programs before the Faculty of 
Music. 

To be classified in a given class in Music the pupil must 
have completed the entire work indicated below for the 
previous class or classes, and must take the whole of the work 
laid down for the class she wishes to enter. Instrumental 
or vocal work is not sufficient for enrollment in a given class 
without the theoretical work. 

Classification in music is entirely distinct from academic 
classification; but the satisfactory accomplishment of the 
full work of the Freshman or higher classes in music is counted 
toward academic graduation, provided the pupil is at that 
time a member of the College. 

Classes in Jflustc 

(It should be carefully noted that the names of the classes 
as here used are of musical standing only, and do not refer 
to the academic class of which the same pupil may be a member.) 

The regular course is designed to cover a period of four 
years from the time of entering the Freshman class, but the 
thoroughness of the work is considered of far more impor- 
tance than the rate of advance. It may require two or more 
years to complete the work of the Preparatory class. 
Preparatory. — Theory 1 and Course J in Piano, or in Voice, 
or in Violin. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 61 

Freshman. — Theory 2 and Course 2 in Piano, or in Organ, 

or in Voice, or in Violin. 
Sophomore. — Theory 3 and Course 3 in Piano, or in Organ, or 

in Voice, or in Violin. 
Junior. — Harmony I, Music History I, Ensemble Work and 

Course 4 in Piano, or in Organ, or in Voice, or in Violin. 
Senior. — Harmony 2, Music History 2, Ensemble Work and 

Course 5 in Piano, or in Organ, or in Voice, or in Violin. 
For voice pupils the "Psychology of Singing" is substituted 
for 2d year Harmony. 

&toarbfii 

The Certificate of the Department is awarded under the 
following conditions: 

1. The candidate must have completed the work, theoretical 
and technical, of the Senior Class in the Music Department. 
(See above.) 

2. The candidate must have been for at least two years a 
pupil of the department. 

3. The candidate must have finished the technical work re- 
quired and have passed a satisfactory examination thereon, at 
least one-half year before the certificate recital which she must 
give at the end of the year. 

A Teacher's Certificate will be given in Piano, Organ, 
Violin or Voice, respectively, on the same conditions as the 
regular Certificate, with the following modifications. 

1. The applicant does not have to complete her technical 
work before the end of the year. 

2. She does not have to give a public recital. 

3. She must demonstrate by practice during her last year 
her ability to teach the subject in which she applies for the 
Teacher's Certificate. 

The Diploma, the highest honor in the Music Department, 
is awarded to a pupil who has already received the Certificate 
and who thereafter pursues advanced work in technique and 
interpretation for at least one year at the school. This work 



62 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 

will be determined by the Music Faculty, and the candidate 
must pass an examination satisfactory to the Faculty and 
give a public recital in order to be entitled to this award. 

Qtabtmit Crebtt for jHuStc Courses 

The theoretical work in Music is credited for academic 
classification as follows: 

Harmony I and II (one point each). 

Music History I and II (one point each). 

Total: 4 points. 

The foregoing studies are credited, like any academic sub- 
ject, only when the pupil has attained an average of 75 per 
cent on the recitations and examinations of the year. 

The technical work in Music is also credited for academic 
classification as follows: 

The completion at the School of the technical work in the 
Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, or Senior classes in Music will 
entitle the pupil to 3 points of academic credit for the work of 
each class thus completed under the following conditions: 

(1) Not more than three points may be earned in any one year 
in Piano, Voice, Violin, or Organ — whether one or more of these 
subjects is studied. 

(2) Not more than 12 points (one-fifth of the total amount 
required for graduation from the College) may be earned in all. 

(3) In order to be entitled to credit the pupil must be a member 
of the College. (Preparatory pupils may not count Music toward 
subsequent academic graduation.) 

(4) In order to be entitled to credit for the technical work 
of a given class in music, the pupil must also have completed 
satisfactorily the theoretical work of that class. 

(5) Promotion to a given course in technical work is evidence 
of the satisfactory completion of the work of the previous course 



St. Maet's School Bulletin. 63 

tEfje iWinimum of &caoemic WLovk Beouireo for 
Certificates; 

Candidates for Certificates in the Music Department, the 
Art Department, the Elocution Department, or in Domestic 
Science, must have completed the following minimum of 
academic work. This work must have been done at St. 
Mary's, or be credited by certificate or examination in 
accordance with the regular rules for credits. 

(1) The A and B Courses in English, History, Mathematics, 
Science, and in either Latin or French or German. 

(2) The C and D Courses in English and in History. 

(3) Such other C and D Courses as will amount to "eight 
points" of Academic credit. 

For example: 

Mathematics C and D; 
or Latin C and D; 

or French C and D and German C and D; 
or Math. C and Science C and D; 
or Latin C and French C and D, etc. 

It will be observed that the above covers the requirements for 
entrance to the Freshman Class of the Academic Department with 
"20 points" in college work. {"60 points" is the requirement for 
an Academic Diploma.) 

&fje Courses! 

The courses in Music are divided into Theoretical (includ- 
ing for convenience History of Music) and Technical. 

(Efjeoretical Courses 

Theory 1. (Miss Dorroh.) One hour a week. 
Cummings, Rudiments of Music. 

Theory 2. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. 

Virgil, Exercises for the Study of Time and Practical Instruc- 
tion in Ear Training; Rhythm; Elementary Exercises in 
Sight Reading; Gow, Structure of Music. 



64 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Theory 3. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. 

The Scale. Shepherd, Simplified Harmony. Ear-training 
continued. Sight Reading. Ritter, Musical Dictation. 

Harmony 1. (Miss ) One hour a week. One point.* 

Emery, Lessons in Harmony. 

Harmony 2. (Miss ) One hour a week. One point* 

Emery, Lessons in Harmony (continued). 
History of Music 1. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. One 
point* 

Parry, History of Music; Elson, Club Programs of All Nations. 
History op Music 2. (Miss Dowd.) One hour a week. One 
point* 
Pauer, Musical Form. 

GTecfcrncal Courses! 

In general, each course corresponds to a year's work for a 
pupil with musical taste. But even faithful work for some 
pupils may require more than a year for promotion. 



Course I. — All major scales in chromatic order, hands to- 
gether, quarter note M.M. 100. Harmonic and melodic 
minor scales, hands separate, eighth note M.M. 100. Major 
arpeggios, hands separate, quarter note M.M. 80. Studies, 
Duvernoy 176; Kohler op. 157, 242; Heller op. 47; Burg- 
muller op. 100. Easier sonatinas by Lichner, Clementi, 
Kuhlau, etc. Read at sight first-grade piece. 

Course II. — Major scales, hands together, quarter note M.M. 
116. Harmonic and melodic minor scales, hands separate, 
quarter note M.M. 100; together M.M. 80. Arpeggios, 
major and minor, hands separate, quarter note 92. Duvernoy 
op. 120; Czerny 636; Le Couppey op. 20; Heller op. 46; 
Bach Little Preludes and Fugues. One major scale on 
octaves, hands separate, eighth note M.M. 120. Turner 
Octaves op. 28. Vogt Octaves. Sonatinas Kuhlau, Dia- 
belli, etc. Read at sight second-grade piece. 

Course III. — Harmonic and melodic minor scales, hands to- 
gether, quarter note M.M. 116. Arpeggios, major and 



* These points count on the academic standing of the pupil, provided she is 
already enrolled as a full member of a college class. 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 65 

minor, hands together, quarter note M.M. 92. Major 
scales in octaves in chromatic order, hands separate, quar- 
ter note M.M. 72. Three scales in thirds, sixths, tenths, 
and contrary motion, quarter note M.M. 100. Czerny 299; 
Berens op. 61; Kraus op. 2; Heller op. 45; Bach Two-Part 
Inventions. Easier Sonatas Clementi, Mozart, Haydn, 
Beethoven. Read at sight third-grade piece. 

Course IV. — Minor scales, hands together, quarter note M.M. 
132. Major and minor arpeggios, hands together, M.M. 
116. Three minor (melodic and harmonic) scales in in- 
tervals M.M. 100. Major scales in octaves, hands together 
M.M. 72. Scale of C in double-third, hands separate, 
eighth note M.M. 100. Bach French Suites, Three-part 
Inventions. Cramer Etudes. Clementi "Gradus ad Par- 
nassum" sonatas. Read at sight a third-grade piece or 
play a simple accompaniment. 

Course V. — Six major scales and six minor scales (three har- 
monic and three melodic), in intervals M.M. 116. Arpeg- 
gios, dominant and diminished 7ths, hands together, M.M. 
116. All major scales in double thirds, hands separate, 
M.M. 72. Advanced studies in interpretation in prepara- 
tion for public recital. Public recital. 

Course 1. — Breathing, tone placement and tone development. 
Sight singing. Studies by Wm. Shakespeare, a pupil of 
the great Francesco Lamperti. Sieber, eight-measure 
studies. Concone Marchesi, Bordogni. Nava, Elements of 
Vocalization. Simple Songs and Ballads. 

Course 2. — Management of breath, sight singing. Studies by 
Lamperti, Solfeggio Concone Vocalises. Bordogni Easy 
Vocalises, Marchesi Vocalises, Righnini Exercises, Vaccai 
Method. Modern songs and easy classics. 

Course 3. — Spiker, Masterpieces of Vocalization. Books 1-2. 
Mazzoni Vocalises. Concone, Vocalises. Lamperti, Studies 
in Bravura. Viardot, An Hour of Study 1. Classic songs 
and arias. 

Course 4. — Otta Vocalizzi, Vannini. Bona, Rhythmical Articu- 
lation; Viardot, An Hour of Study 2. Spiker, Master- 
pieces of Vocalization, Books 3-4. Manuel Jarcia, Studies. 



66 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 

Course 5. — Classic Songs. Concert, Oratorio-Opera-Colorature- 
Singing; Roulades and embellishment. Public recital. 

©rgan 

Practical instruction is given from the first rudiments to 
the highest difficulties of the instrument, both in its use as an 
accompaniment to the different styles of Church music, 
and in the various methods of the employment of the organ 
as a solo instrument. 

Opportunity is given to acquire confidence and experience 
by practice in accompanying the services of the Chapel, 
beginning with the easier work at the daily services of the 
School and going on through the accompaniment of anthems 
and more elaborate services on Sunday. 

Course 1. — The organ pupil must have enough work in piano 
to enable her to enter the Freshman Class in piano. This 
constitutes the preparatory work for the organ course. 

Course 2. — Clemens' Organ School. Bach's Eight Short Pre- 
ludes and Fugues. Easy Preludes and Fugues by Merkel 
and Batiste. Horner's Pedal Studies Book. 

Course 3. — Buck's Pedal Studies. Bach's Preludes and Fugues. 
Light Solos for the Organ by Wely, Batiste, DuBois. Studies 
by Buck, Guilmant, Lemare. Service playing. 

Course 4. — Bach's Greater Fugues. Carl's Master Studies. 
Sonatas by Mendelssohn, Widor, Guilmant, Wolstenholme. 
Service playing. 

Course 5. — Standard Overtures of the Old and Modern Mas- 
ters. Service playing. Public recital. 

An advanced piano pupil might do the work of two of the 
above courses in one year. 

Violin 

The course in Violin is indicated in the summary given 
below. Pupils of the department, if sufficiently advanced 
are required to take part in the Orchestra, which is included 
in the regular work of the department. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 67 

Course 1. — Exercises and studies by Heming, David (Part I). 
Dancla, Hofman op. 25, Wohlfahrt op. 45. Easy solos by 
Hauser, Sitt, Dancla, Papini, etc. 

Course 2. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, David (Part 
II), Sevcik op. 6, Kayser op. 37. Solos adapted to the 
needs of pupils. 

Course 3. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, David (Part 
II), Sevcik op. 6, op. 8, op. 9, Dont, Kayser op. 20, Kreut- 
zer. Solos by DeBeriot, Dancla, etc. Modern composers. 

Course 4. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, Sevcik, Rode, 
Kreutzer. Sonatas, Concertos by Viotti, Spohr, DeBeriot, 
etc. 

Course 5. — Exercises and studies by Sevcik, Mazas, Fiorillio. 
Sonatas, Concertos. Public recital. 

A knowledge of piano, sufficient to play second grade pieces 
at least, is required in the case of pupils in the last two courses. 



68 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 

Art Department 

Miss Clara Fenner, Director. 

The aim of the Art Department is to afford an opportunity 
for serious study, and to give a thorough Art education, which 
will form the basis of further study in the advanced schools 
of this country and abroad; also, to enable pupils who com- 
plete the full course to become satisfactory teachers. All 
work is done from nature. 

The Studio is open daily during school hours. Candidates 
for a certificate in the Art Department must pass satis- 
factorily the course in Drawing, Painting, and the History of 
Art, and must also satisfy the academic requirements for a 
certificate as stated on page 63. 

The technical work in the Art Course, leading to a certifi- 
cate, ordinarily requires a period of three years for comple- 
tion. About half of this time is required for Drawing, and 
the second half for Painting. 

I. Drawing. The pupil is first instructed in the free- 
hand drawing of geometric solids, whereby she is taught the 
fundamentals of good drawing, the art of measuring correctly, 
and the drawing of straight and curved lines. This work is 
exceedingly important. 

Next the pupil is taught drawing from still-life, with shad- 
ing; the drawing of plants; of casts; original designs — con- 
ventional and applied— in black and white, and in color; 
and pencil sketches from nature. 

After this comes charcoal drawings; or shading in pen and 
ink; or wash-drawings in monochrome as in magazine illus- 
trating. 

II. Painting. This includes work in oil and in water 
color. 

The student is required to paint two large still-life groups; 
two large landscapes; two flower studies, one a copy and one 
from nature; several sketches from nature, and two original 
designs. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 69 

III. History of Art. — This study includes the history of 
Architecture, Sculpture, and Painting. This course is 
important and is required of all pupils in the regular art 
course. 

Special Courses. — Pupils who do not wish to take the 
regular course may take any of the above courses or of the 
following special courses: 

1. Flower Painting. — Special attention is given to flower 
painting in water color. 

2. Still-lite Painting. — This work is preparatory to more 
advanced work in the flower painting and life classes. Either 
oil or water color may be used as a medium. 

3. China Painting. 

4. Life Class. — A living model is provided from which the 
pupils may draw and paint. 

5. Sketch Club. — This club is formed of pupils who take 
turn in posing in costume. The same model poses only once. 
During the spring and fall months outdoor sketching from 
nature is done. 

6. Advanced Antique. — All classes are graded according to 
this work. Drawing from Greek antiques in charcoal is required 
of all pupils taking the full course. 

7. Composition Class. — This class is one of the most im- 
portant in the department, and makes for the development of 
the creative and imaginative faculties. Subjects are given and 
"pictures" must be painted and submitted for criticism on 
certain days in the term. 

8. Design Class. — This work is planned according to the 
principles originated and applied by Arthur W. Dow, and is a 
combination of the Occidental and Oriental principles. A close 
study of nature and an original imaginative use of her forms 
in design is the keynote of this method. 

9. Architectural and Mechanical Drawing. — To supply 
the demand for women draftsmen in architects' offices, a special 
course in Architectural and Mechanical Drawing is offered by 
the School. The course begins with geometrical figures, pro- 
jections of objects, and leads up gradually to the highest forms of 
architectural work. 

10. Pyrography. — Apart from the regular work, some mem- 
bers of the Art Class have shown much interest in recent sessions 
in the work of this class. 

11. Stenciling. — This class offers an opportunity for applying 
a knowledge of designing. 



70 St. Mart's School Bulletin". 



Business Department 

Miss Lizzie H. Lee, Director. 

The Business Department of St. Mary's was established 
in 1897 to meet the growing demand for instruction in the 
commercial branches, which are more and more affording 
women a means of livelihood. The course is planned to 
accomplish this purpose as nearly as possible. 

The curriculum embraces thorough instruction in Stenog- 
raphy, Typewriting, Manifolding, etc.; Bookkeeping, Arith- 
metic, Penmanship, and English. 

Pupils taking, as is advised, the course in connection with 
academic work, would ordinarily complete the Business 
Course in one school year. 

Pupils may take either the full course or any part of it. 

Graduates of the Department have been universally suc- 
cessful in their practical business engagements, and are the 
best recommendation for the work of the department. 

Jkgutrements 

In order to be well prepared to take the course to advantage, 
pupils before entering the Business Department should have 
satisfactorily completed the work of the Preparatory School 
or its equivalent. 

Attention is called to the fact that the services of a stenog- 
rapher and her ability to command a high salary depend not 
so much on her technical skill in actual typewriting and 
stenography, to which much may be added by practice after- 
wards, but to the preliminary mental equipment with which 
she undertakes her technical preparation. 

The Business Certificate is awarded those pupils who 
complete the work of the full course, including all the work 



St. Maky's School Bulletin. 71 

required for certificates in Stenography, Typewriting and 
Bookkeeping, including the academic course in English 
(English C), Commercial Arithmetic and Commercial Geog- 
raphy. 

The Diploma of the department is reserved for those pupils 
who in addition to completing the work required for the 
Business Certificate have the mental equipment to do unusu- 
ally good work in their profession, and who have demon- 
strated their fitness for such work by actual practice. 

Certificates in Stenography, Typewriting or Bookkeeping 
are awarded pupils who have completed the respective 
requirements stated below. 

Courses; 

In Stenography, the Isaac Pitman System of Shorthand 
is used. This is the standard system, the most practical 
of all systems, is easily acquired, and meets all the demands 
of the amanuensis and the reporter. 

The work of the courses and the requirements for Certi- 
ficates are as follows: 

Stenography. — The texts used are Isaac Pitman's Short 
Course in Shorthand, Business Correspondence in Shorthand 
Nos. 1 and 2, and Book of Phrases and Constructions. In con- 
nection with the texts, the following books from the Isaac Pitman 
shorthand library are used in class for reading and dictation 
purposes: Vicar of Wakefield, Irving's Tales and Sketches, Ma- 
caulay's Warren Hastings, Dickens' Haunted Man, Leaves from 
the Note Book of Thomas Allen Reed, etc. 

The pupils are taught Manifolding, Composition, Punctuation, 
Spelling, Business Forms, Correspondence, and Reporting. 

To receive the Certificate, the pupil must have completed 
the required work in the foregoing; must have attained a speed 
of at least 80 words a minute from dictation; and must have 
completed the work of C English in the Academic Department. 

A Certificate in Stenography will not be given, unless the pupil 
has also taken the course in Typewriting. 



72 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Typewriting. — The touch system is used, and to obtain the 
Certificate the pupil must have attained a speed of 50 words 
a minute from dictation; Jfi words from printed matter; and 
SO words from stenographic notes; and must have completed 
the work of C English. 

Bookkeeping. — For the first principles of the subject, Allen's 
Forty Lessons in Bookkeeping is used as a guide. As the student 
advances, the instruction becomes thoroughly practical, a regular 
set of books is opened, and the routine of a well-ordered business 
house thoroughly investigated and practically pursued. The 
object is to prepare the pupil to fill a position immediately after 
graduation from the School. 

For the Certificate, in addition to the technical work in Book- 
keeping, the course in Commercial Arithmetic (Math. X) must 
be completed. 



St. Maby's School Bulletin. 73 



Department of Elocution 

Miss Florence C. Davis Director. 

The faculty of expressing oneself clearly and effectively 
is valuable in every calling. A well trained voice, and clear 
enunciation are equally desirable in ordinary conversation 
and in public speaking. The purpose of the study of elocu- 
tion is to attain these ends; to broaden the power of individual 
thinking, to awaken a love and appreciation of literature by 
the lucid interpretation of it to others, and to train teachers. 

Regular Bkequtreb OTorfe 

Students of the Freshman and Upper Preparatory classes 
are required to take a period of expression each week in 
connection with their regular work, and for this there is 
no extra charge. This course deals with fundamental 
reading. Particular attention is paid to the standing position, 
articulation, pronunciation, projection, breath control, and 
the correction of mannerisms, leading the student to read 
intelligently so as to give pleasure to the listener. 

Special USorfe 

The special courses, which should be taken by students 
in connection with work in the academic department and for 
which the charge is extra are (1) Class Expression and (2) 
Private Expression. 

Class; expression 

In this class the number is limited and each student re- 
ceives careful individual attention. The course is so arranged 
as to afford the student the opportunity to appear in informal 
recitals from time to time, thereby gaining in confidence and 
poise. 

10 



74 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 

3Pribate expression 

The course of the private pupil is more inclusive. A thor- 
ough training is given in all the principles of expression. 
During the year each student appears in public recitals for 
which she is taught to interpret the best literature. 

Private pupils are admitted to the Dramatic Club, giving 
them the advantage of the study and presentation of at least 
two good plays during the year. 

gtoaros 

As in other departments, the Certificate is only awarded 
if the student has completed the required Minimum of 
Academic Work in the College (see page 63). 

The regular course of the department is planned to extend 
over four years, leading to the Diploma. 

The Certificate is awarded on the completion of the work 
of the Third Year and the giving of a public recital. 

Students who have practically completed the academic 
work before taking up the work of the department may be 
able to complete the Three Years' Course in two years. 

Outline of tfje Course for ©iploma or Certificate 

Jfirfit 19ear 

Philosophy of Expression (Preparation for public read- 
ing). — Evolution of Expression, vols. I and II. The training in 
this first year is primary and objective. 

Public Reading. — The major part of the time is devoted 
to fundamental problems. A portion of each week is devoted 
to drill on selections of the pupil's individual choice, and these 
selections are presented at informal recitals during the year. 

Gesture. — Freeing exercises. Significance of carriage, atti- 
tude, and movement. Principles of gesture. 

Voice. — Fundamental work for freeing and developing the 
voice. Basic principles of voice production; voice placing, 
deep breathing, control of breath, vowel forming, consonantal 
articulation, development of vocal range, intonation, melody of 
speech. Correction of individual faults. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 75 

Dramatic Art. — Platform deportment. Correct sitting, 
standing and walking, entrance and exit, platform methods and 
traditions. 

Pantomine. — Elementary principles. Correction of defects 
and mannerisms in bodily expression and in facial expression. 

H>econb gear 

Philosophy of Expression. — Evolution of Expression, vols. 
Ill and IV. Principles of the four volumes — a careful study 
of the sixteen laws of evolution which are founded on psycho- 
logical principles. 

Public Reading. — Students are allowed more freedom in 
their choice of selections. 

Gesture. 

Voice. — Review of fundamentals. 

Emerson System of Physical Culture. 

Dramatic Art. — Presentation of scenes and one-act plays. 

Recitals. 

Wfyivb gear 

Poetic Interpretation. — The poetry of Tennyson, Lowell, 
Longfellow, Kipling, and other masters. 

Applied Gesture and Voice. 

Physical Training. — The four divisions of the Emerson 
System in their relation to unity and expression. (Normal 
work.) 

Impersonation. — Two or more Shakespearean plays with 
especial reference to the differentiation of the characters. 

Dramatic Art. — Study of the farce, comedy, burlesque, 
melodrama, and tragedy. Dramatization of a story or original 
plot. 

Recitals. (Public.) 

Jfourtfj gear 

Poetic Interpretation. — Continued. 
Extemporaneous Speaking and Debate. 
Pedagogy. 
Psychology. 

Gymnastics. — Floor work including free exercises, apparatus 
work, marching, indoor and outdoor games. 
Bible. — Bible and hymn reading. 
Impersonation. — Continued . 
Dramatic Art. — Classical plays. 
Recitals. 



76 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 



Domestic Science 

Miss S. Marguerite Lane. 

The purpose of Domestic Science is to afford training in 
the subjects that pertain to life in the home, to enable young 
women to become proficient in practical housework and in 
making the home more comfortable and beautiful. 

The course offered at St. Mary's seeks to stimulate self- 
direction, to encourage application, and to develop skill. 

A large recently remodeled and newly equipped domestic 
science kitchen is arranged to provide the best facilities for 
class-work both individual and co-operative, and a special 
dining-room gives the class opportunity for putting into 
practice methods of service. A series of luncheons is served 
by the class in this dining-room, applying the lessons on the 
laying of the table, the serving of different meals, the prepara- 
tion of the meal, the care of the dining-room, and of the 
table, silver, china, etc. 

The fee, including instruction and laboratory fee, is $25.00 
for each course. 

The work in Domestic Science is considered of great im- 
portance, and it is hoped that in the near future it will be 
possible to add lessons in Sewing and other domestic arts. 

The Certificate in Domestic Science is awarded on the 
completion of the course to those students who have also 
completed the minimum of Academic Work in the College 
required for all Certificates (see page 33). 

Wot Course 

The work is covered in two courses: a first year course, 
and a second year course. 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 77 

Domestic Science I (Academic Credit: 2 points) requires 
four hours a week of practical work and one hour of theory. 
It includes the selection, purchase, preservation, preparation, 
and serving of food; the disposal of waste; the care of the 
house; marketing; serving; household hygiene; the funda- 
mental principles and practice of cooking; the composition 
and nutritive value of food; the study of special foods — 
vegetables, soup, candy, cereals and cereal products, eggs, 
fish, meats, milk and milk products, cheese, beverages, flour, 
doughs, batters, and sugar. 

Household Hygiene includes a knowledge of how to select 
the location of the home, the nature of materials, the planning 
of the house and drawing of practicable plans, the selection 
of furniture, the plumbing, water-supply, etc. 

Domestic Science 1 1 (2 points) includes a study of house- 
hold bacteriology, and household chemistry, with fancy 
cooking, etc., etc. 

Household Bacteriology involves a training in laboratory 
practice, the principles and their significance, and their 
application to life problems. 

Household Chemistry includes the study of chemical sub- 
stances met by the housekeeper, the tests for various foods, 
the analysis of foods, the chemistry of starch and sugar, 
nitrogenous foods, fats, etc., the testing of foods for the 
presence of preservatives and adulterants, etc. 

Continuing the work of the First Year in Cookery, invalid 
and infant cookery are studied, fancy cookery, the planning of 
menus for definite amounts, the planning of meals with differ- 
ent food-principles in correct proportion, canning, preserving, 
salad making and chafing dish dainties. 



78 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

Constant reference is had to the current standard texts, 
including : 

The Library of Household Economy (12 volumes). 
Bulletins of the Department of Agriculture. 
Clark, Book of Domestic Science. 

Williams & Fisher, Elements of the Theory and Practice of 
Cookery. 

Olsen, Pure Food. 

Blanchard, Chemistry of the Household. 

And others. 



St. Mart's School Bulletin". 79 



General School Regulations 

The effort of St. Mary's School is to maintain, as far as 
possible, the family life of the students entrusted to its care. 

Day pupils are expected to conform to all the household 
requirements of the school while present. 

The desire of parents will always be carefully considered, 
but the final authority in all cases is vested with the Rector. 
It is understood that in sending a pupil to the School the 
parent agrees to submit to such rules as the Rector thinks 
necessary for the good of the School as a whole. 

Parents wishing pupils to have special permission for any 
purpose, should communicate directly with the Rector, 
and not through the pupil. 

No pupil will be permitted to take less than the minimum 
hours of work. 

Written explanations must be presented by pupils request- 
ing excuse for absence, tardiness, or lack of preparation in 
any duty. 

In accepting the responsibility for the care of the students 
at St. Mary's, it is necessary to state that no boarding pupils 
are desired whose sense of honor is not sufficiently developed 
to make it possible to trust them (1) not to endanger life and 
property by forbidden use of fire, (2) not to go off the ample 
school grounds without permission, and (3) not to be out 
of their proper place when they are expected to be in bed. 

examinations 

No pupil is excused from any of the regular school exam- 
inations, and all examinations missed by reason of illness 
must be made up. 

&ttenoance 

All pupils are required to arrive in time for the opening 
of the School session and to remain until its close. 



80 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

The only recess, or holiday, when pupils are allowed to leave 
the School, is at the time of the Christmas vacation. 

This holiday, as a rule, is of two weeks' duration. The 
whole School is required to be present on time at the close 
of the Christmas vacation. 

There is no Thanksgiving or Easter holiday, and pupils 
are not to leave the school at these seasons. Thanksgiving 
Day is a free day to be celebrated in the School, and Good 
Friday is a Holy Day, but except for these the school duties 
are uninterrupted. 

gbsfence 

With the exception noted below, pupils are not allowed to 
leave the School except in cases of severe illness or for some 
other reason so serious as to seem sufficient to the Rector. 
The application should be made as early as possible directly 
by the parent to the Rector, in writing, if possible. 

Exception. If the pupil's record warrants it, the Rector 
will allow a pupil one or two visits a year to her home, simply 
on the request of the parent that she be allowed to come, the 
pupil leaving the School after 3 p. m. Saturday and returning 
the following Monday evening. The request should be made 
at least a week beforehand. 

While the Rector will cheerfully grant such permissions, 
in a session of only thirty-two weeks with a recess at Christ- 
mas, all such absences are highly undesirable for the sake of 
the pupil and the whole school. 

No such permission whatever can be allowed within one 
week of Thanksgiving Day, or Washington's Birthday, or 
from Palm Sunday to Easter inclusive. 

Vissit& 

The presence of a parent in Raleigh does not in any respect 
absolve a pupil from any regulations of the School without 
permission from the Rector, and obedience to the conditions 



St. Maky's School Bulletin. 81 

governing such permissions is a matter between the pupil 
and the Rector alone. The Rector is glad to have parents 
visit their daughters in Raleigh as often and for as long a time 
as may be convenient to them, and he will take plesaure in 
granting all possible privileges, not inconsistent with the 
welfare of the School, to enable parent and daughter to see 
each other. It is, however, not convenient to have mothers 
spend the night at the school. In general, pupils are not 
excused during school hours, and no exception is made to this 
rule, except where a parent from a distance happens to stop 
over in Raleigh for only an hour or two. Except for very 
serious necessity, parents are urgently requested not to ask 
that their daughters come to the Railway Station to meet 
them. No pupil is allowed to spend the night outside of 
the School except with her mother, or one who sustains a 
mother's relation to her. 

Visitors are not desired on Sunday. Ladies from the city 
are heartily welcome on afternoons other than Saturday 
or Sunday between half-past three and half -past five. The 
members of the Faculty assisted by some of the pupils 
receive on Wednesdays from four to half-past five. 

All visitors are received in the parlor. 

Invitations to pupils should be sent through the Rector. 

Cfmrc?) &ttenbance 

Town pupils as well as boarding pupils are expected to 
attend the daily Chapel service at 8:30 a.m. As St. Mary's 
is distinctly a Church school, all boarding pupils are required 
to attend all Chapel services. 

JBormitoxita anb 3&ooms 

The assignment of pupils to quarters will be determined 
on the basis of date of formal application, age, classification, 
and length of time at the School. To obtain a room assigned 
a pupil must arrive on time. 



82 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

In assigning pupils to rooms, the Rector does not waive 
the right to change a pupil, at any time, from a room to a 
dormitory, if in his judgment it is best for the discipline of 
the School. 

Pupils are advised to spend their first year in a dormitory. 

Communications 

All telegrams for the pupils should be addressed to the 
Rector. All letters with regard to the pupils should be 
addressed to the Rector, but when desired communications 
pertaining to their health and personal welfare may be 
addressed to the Lady Principal. 

Correspondence with the home circle is freely encouraged, 
but beyond this there is no time, even were it otherwise de- 
sirable, for letter writing. 



Parents will confer a favor by consulting simplicity in the 
dress of their daughters. 

All pupils are expected to wear white muslin dresses at 
Commencement and at all public entertainments given by 
the School. 

Simple high-neck dresses should be worn by the pupils 
on all public occasions. 

Dressmaking, should, so far as possible, be attended to 
at home, as there is neither time nor opportunity for it while 
at St. Mary's. 

pocket Jfflonep 

The Rector can not advance funds to pupils for books, 
stationery, pocket money, or for any purpose, without pre- 
vious and special arrangements with parents. Money for 
these purposes should always be deposited with the School at 
the beginning of each session. The cost of books, stationery, 
sheet music, and art material should not ordinarily exceed 
$25.00 for the year. Pocket money should in all cases be 
limited and should be deposited with the Rector, to be paid 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 83 

on call under the parent's direction. These figures refer to 
actual necessities, not to foolish indulgences. 

Bills must positively not be contracted at the stores and the 
merchants are notified to this effect. 

General Btectplme 

With regard to discipline, it is desired to have as few rules, 
and to grant as many privileges as possible. But in so large 
a community the rules must be obeyed and enforced uni- 
formly and the privileges must be withdrawn, if they are 
abused or work injury to the individual and the School, 
and it must be remembered that no privilege can be allowed 
to any one which could not, under similar circumstances be 
allowed to all who ask for it. In working together for the 
good of the whole School both parents and the School author- 
ities will in the end succeed best in securing the good of each 
individual. 



Parents, please remember that your daugh- 
ter's character depends on learning the duty of 
obedience to law and order. 



84 St. Mart's School Bulletin - . 



Terms 

All regular fees are due and must be paid quarterly in 
advance. 

Pupils are required to register at the beginning of each 
half-year, and no pupil will be allowed to register until all 
past fees have been paid. 

Pupils are not received for less than a half-year, or the 
remainder of a half-year. As a matter of simple justice to 
the School, parents are asked to give ample notice of inten- 
tion to withdraw a pupil at the end of the half-year. 

No deduction is made for holidays or for absence or with - 
drawal of pupils from school, except in cases of protracted 
sickness. In cases of absence or withdrawal for protracted 
sickness the School and the parent will divide losses for the 
remainder of the half-year. 

entrance 

An Entrance Fee is required of all boarding pupils at the 
time of filing application for entrance, as a guarantee for 
holding place. This fee is in no case returned, but on the 
entrance of the pupil is credited to her regular account. 

The Entrance Fee to reserve an alcove in one of the Dormi- 
tories is $5. 

The Entrance Fee to reserve a room-place in East Rock 
House, West Rock House, Main Building, or North Dormi- 
tory is $10. 

The Entrance Fee to reserve a room-place in East Wing or 
West Wing is $25. 

The difference in charge for the various rooms, correspond- 
ing to their desirability and location, is made largely for the 
convenience of patrons. The uniform charge in the past 
has led to some misunderstanding. It is hoped that the 
payment of a definite fee, graded according to location, will 
obviate all difficulties. 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 85 

Regular Cfjarge* 

Boarding Pupils. — The regular charge for the school year 
is $300. This includes all living expenses (except room-rent 
for pupils in rooms) and all regular school fees in the Academic 
or Business Departments. There is no extra charge for 
Languages. 

The regular charge includes Board, Heat, Light, Alcove, 
Laundry, Contingent Fee, Medical Fee, Library Fee, and 
Academic or Business Tuition. 

Room-rent is $10 or $25 for the session for each pupil, the 
charge varying with the location of the room. 

Room-rent for places in East Wing or West Wing is $25 
for each pupil; in the other buildings, $10. 

Local Pupils. — The full regular charge is $53.50. 

Academic Tuition $50. 00 

Contingent Fee 2. 50 

Library Fee 1.00 

$53.50 
Pupils of the Primary Department are charged $30. 

€xtra Cfjargea 

Mu&it department 

Piano, Organ, or Violin $50 

If from the Director 60 

Vocal 60 

Use of Piano for practice 5 

Use of Organ for practice 10 

This charge is for one hour's practice each school day during 
the session. Additional practice is charged for at the same rates. 

Theory of Music, History of Music, or Harmony $10 

Music pupils are required to take one of these three subjects. 



86 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 

&rt department 

Drawing, etc $30 

Painting in oil or water color 50 

Art History 10 

Work in special classes at special rates. 

^Business Department 
Regular tuition $50 

This includes any or all of the business branches, with English 
and Arithmetic. No reduction is made for a partial course, 
except as follows: 

Typewriting alone $15 

Bookkeeping alone 25 

The fee includes the use of typewriter. 

elocution Department 

Private Lessons $50 

Lessons in Class 10 

Domestic Science Course 
Tuition and Laboratory Fee $25 

Occasional Jfees 

Laboratory Fee. — A fee of from $3 to $5 is charged 
pupils using the Science Laboratory. 

This fee is to cover cost of material and varies with the course. 

Graduation Fee. — A fee of $2 is charged each pupil 
receiving a Diploma in any department; and a fee of $1 is 
charged each pupil receiving a Certificate. 

3Jnctfoental Charges 

These are not properly school charges, but are simply 
charges for materials or money which the school furnishes 
to the pupil as a convenience to the parent. 

A statement of the Incidental Account is sent quarterly. 

Parents are requested to make an Incidental Deposit to 



St. Mart's School Bulletin. 87 

cover the cost of materials bought by the school and furnished 
to the pupils, and also to provide pocket money. As these 
charges will vary with need, no definite statement can be 
made, but ordinarily $25 for the year will be sufficient in 
addition to the allowance for pocket money. 

Sheet Music and Art Materials are furnished by the school 
and charged at regular prices. 

Books and stationery will be furnished by the school if 
a deposit is made for this purpose. 

It is advisable that the pocket money should be furnished 
only through the Rector, and it is urged that the amount 
should not exceed one dollar a week. 

explanatory Statement of Regular Charges 

The regular charges given in concise form on page 85 may be 
further explained as follows: 

Academic Tuition. — The charge ($50) is the same for a 
full course or a partial course. 

A pupil, however, taking only one or two classes, is charged 
$20 a class. 

Laundry. — The regular change for the year covers an 
average of $1.50 worth of laundry each week, or $48 worth 
for the year, at regular laundry prices. Additional pieces 
are charged extra at half rates. Laundry lists with prices 
will be sent on request. Pupils are expected to limit the 
number of fancy pieces. 

Medical Fee. — This fee, which is included in the regular 
charge, entitles boarding pupils to the attention of the School 
Physician in all cases of ordinary sickness, and to such 
ordinary medical supplies as may be needed, without further 
charge. Cases of major surgery, however, and special 
treatment of eyes, ears, etc., and dental services are not in- 
cluded, and the expense of these, when necessary, must be 
borne by the parent or guardian. All special prescriptions 
are charged extra. 



88 St. Maby's School Bulletin. 

Pupils whose parents prefer to have some one other than 
the School Physician may, with the Rector's consent, call in, 
at their own expense, some other reputable physician with 
whom the School Physician can consult. 

©ebucttons 

A deduction of 10 per cent in the tuition charge is made in 
the case of pupils who take Vocal and Instrumental Music, 
Piano and Elocution, Music and Art, and like combinations. 
This deduction is made only to pupils who pay Academic tuition. 

A deduction of $10 each for the year is made in the charges 
when two or more boarding pupils enter from the same family. 

A deduction of 10 per cent of the tuition charge is made when 
two or more day pupils enter from the same family. 

These deductions are all conditional on the bill being paid in 
advance. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 89 



Requisites 

Boarding pupils are expected to bring with them — 
Bed-linen for single bed. 
4 sheets, 54x90, 
3 pillow-cases, 1 9x34, 
2 counterpanes, white, 
1 pair blankets, 
6 towels, 

6 napkins and ring, 
Cloak or cape, 
Umbrella, 
Overshoes. 
These, and all articles of clothing, must be distinctly 
marked with the owner's name. 

Teachers are expected to furnish the same requisites for 
their apartments. 



90 St. Mart's School Bulletin. 



Full information concerning all the Scholarships at St. Mary's is published 
in Bulletin Scholarships, which may be had by writing to the School. 



Scholarships in St. Mary's 



Compettttbe H>cf)olarsif)ips; 

1. The David R. Murchison Scholarship, endowed 1903 

($300). 

2. The Smedes Memorial (Alumnae) Scholarship, en- 

dowed 1904 ($270). 
These scholarships, when vacant, are filled by competitive 
examination of qualified applicants. Neither of them will, 
in ordinary course, be again vacant until May, 1913. 

J^on=Compettttbe g>rf)olar£tf)tps( 

(Euttion g>ri)oIar£ff)ipjs ($50) 

1 . Clergy Scholarships. For daughters of the clergy. 

Not limited in number. Allotted by the Rector of 
St. Mary's. 

2. Raleigh City Schools Scholarship. One filled each 
year. The holder is nominated by the Principal of the 
Raleigh High School. 

3. Sass Scholarship. For pupils of Misses Sass' School, 

Charleston, S. C. The holder nominated by Miss 
Sass. 

4. Mary Ruffest Smith Scholarship of the Diocese of 

North Carolina. The holder nominated by the Bishop 
of the Diocese. 

JSoarb anb Cuitton jgnfjolarsfjips ($250) 

1 . Mary Rufftn Smith Scholarships of the Diocese of 
North Carolina. (Two.) The holders nominated by 
the Bishop of the Diocese. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 91 

Mary E. Chapeau Scholarship of the Diocese of North 
Carolina. The holder nominated by the Bishop of 
the Diocese. Primarily for daughters of the clergy. 

Mary E. Chapeau Scholarship of the Diocese of East 
Carolina. The holder nominated by the Bishop of 
East Carolina. Primarily for daughters of the clergy. 

The Madame Clement Memorial Scholarship, 
founded 1 905. The holder nominated by the President 
of the Board of Trustees after conference with his 
fellow Bishops of the Board. 

The Eliza Battle Pittman Scholarships. (Two.) 
The holders residents of Edgecombe County, North 
Carolina. Nominated by the Rector and Vestry of 
Calvary Church, Tarboro, N. C. 



92 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 



The Alumnae of St. Mary's 



0li iters of tfje £§>t. 0Lavp'& Alumnae Association 
for 1912=13 

Mrs. R. W. Winston, President Raleigh, N. C. 

Mrs. Frank Wood, Vice-President Edenton, N. C. 

Miss Kate McKimmon, Secretary St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Treasurer. . .St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 



Alumnae Council 



Miss Annie G. Root, Raleigh, N. C until 1913 

Mrs. R. C. Strong, Raleigh, N.C until 1913 

Mrs. Wm. E. Shipp, Raleigh, N.C until 1914 

Miss Sarah Cheshire, Raleigh, N.C until 1914 

Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson, Richmond, Va until 1915 

Mrs. W. E. Lindsay, Glendale, S. C until 1915 



Miss Anna N. Buxton, Winston-Salem, N. C, Traveling Secretary. 
Miss Annie G. Root, Raleigh, N. C, Traveling Secretary. 



The Alumnae Association of St. Mary's, which was first 
established in 1880 and meets annually at Commencement, 
has done effective work in aiding the progress of the School, 
and grows yearly stronger and more vigorous. 

In addition to constant assistance rendered St. Mary's by 
the individual members, the Association has completed two 
special works of importance and is now actively engaged 
on the third. 

(1) The Foundation of the Smedes Memorial Scholarship 
in St. Mary's, in memory of the founder and first Rector 
of St. Mary's, his wife, and his son, the second Rector, was 
undertaken early in the life of the Association and completed 
in 1 903, when an endowment of $4,000 was turned over to the 
Trustees. 



tEfje ©tocesan g>ri)ool (for 4ltrte)of tfje Carolina^ 



The 71st session of St. Mary's School begins September 
19, 1912. New pupils arrive September 17. 
Easter Term begins January 23, 1913. 
The 72nd session begins September 18, 1913. 



For Bulletins and other information, address, 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY, 

Rector. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 93 

(2) The Enlarging and Improving of the Chapel, around 
which the fondest recollections and deepest interest of the 
Alumnae center, was undertaken in 1904, and the enlarge- 
ment and adornment was completed in 1 905 at a cost of more 
than $3,500. 

(3) The Endowment of the Mary Iredell Scholarship and 
the Kale McKimmon Scholarship in St. Mary's, the present 
work of the Association, was undertaken at the 1907 Com- 
mencement, on initiative of Miss Emilie W. McVea, a graduate 
of St. Mary's, and later Principal under the second Dr. 
Smedes, now Assistant Professor of English in the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati. The Alumnae propose to raise $6,000 
for this purpose. 

The Alumnae are organized as far as possible into local 
Chapters in their several cities and towns, and these Chap- 
ters hold semi-annual meetings on November 1st, Founders' 
Day, and May 1 2th, Alumnae Day, each year. 

There are upwards of 150 active members of the Raleigh 
Alumnae Chapter, and there are active Chapters in New York 
and Baltimore, as well as in many places nearer home. 



Jform of $Jequegt 

" I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of St, 
Mary's School, Raleigh, North Carolina, their successors 
and assigns, absolutely and forever (the property given), 

- in trust that it shall be used 

for the benefit of said School, in the discretion of said 
Trustees, for building, improvement, equipment or other- 
wise " 

(or) 
" in trust to be invested and the income derived therefrom 
to be used for the benefit of said School in such manner 
and for such purposes as to the Trustees may seem best." 



October, 1912 



g>erie$ I, J|o. 26 



BULLETIN 




Containing Jf ull information l^itij ^egarb to 
^>ci)olargJ)ips! at g>t. Jflarp'g g>cf)0ol 



$ubltsijeb (Bnavttvip bp tfje ibrtjool 



Entered as second class matter at the post office, Raleigh, N. C. 
under the acts of July 18, 1894, and June 6, 1900. 



St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Founded in 1842 by Rev. Aldert Smedes, D.D. 



Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK. .Secretary and Business Manager 



St. Mary's School Bulletin 

Series 1, Number 26 Scholarships 



This number of the Bulletin is intended for the 
information of parents, guardians, school principals, 
the clergy and the general public who are now or may 
be interested in Scholarships. 



All appointments to Scholarships are for a single 
year, but Scholarship holders are eligible to reap- 
pointment from year to year, provided they maintain 
a satisfactory record in Scholarship and Deportment. 

In calculating the cost of attending St. Mary's to 
Scholarship holders, the value of each Scholarship as 
given in this Bulletin should be deducted from the 
amount of the school fees as given in the catalogue 
and as summarized on page 23, of this Bulletin. 



General Rules Applying to All 
Scholarships 

Established by Authority of the Trustees 



In order that a candidate may receive the benefit 
of any scholarship paying more than fifty dollars a 
year she must fulfill the following conditions : 

1. She must by examination enter at least as high as 

the Freshman class of the College without con- 
ditions. 

2. She must take at least fifteen points of college work 

each year. 

3. She must take a regular course in the College lead- 

ing to graduation. 

4. She must each year do such work and conduct her- 

self in such a way as to receive the recommenda- 
tion of the Rector for continuance or reappoint- 
ment as a holder of the scholarship. 

5. Scholarship girls must file regular application pa- 

pers; must pay the Application Fee by August 1st; 
and must pay promptly each quarter such propor- 
tion of cash as is required over and above the 
amount the scholarship provides. 

These rules call attention to three special points :: 

I. The Scholarship Holder must enter the Freshman 

College Class or higher. 
II. She must enter by Examination, and not by Cer- 
tificate alone. 
III. She must take a regular course in the College. 

In general these same rules are applied by the 
Rector to those holding Scholarships of $50. 



6 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

The Requirements for Admission to the Fresh- 
man Class of St. Mary's School 

In order to be admitted to the Freshman Class of 
the College the pupil must meet the requirements 
outlined below in English, History, Mathematics, 
Science and one foreign language — five subjects in 
all. If two foreign languages are offered Science 
may be omitted. 

A pupil admitted in four of the five required sub- 
jects will be admitted as a Conditioned Freshman. 

English and Litebatube. — A good working 
knowledge of the principles of English Grammar as 
set forth in such works as Buehler's Modern Gram- 
mar, with special attention to the analysis and con- 
struction of the English sentence. 

Knowledge of elementary Rhetoric and Composi- 
tion as set forth in such works as Maxwell's Writ- 
ing in English, or Hitchcock's Exercises in English 
Composition. 

Candidates are expected to have had at least two 
years' training in general composition (themes, letter 
writing, and dictation). 

Subjects for composition may be drawn from the 
following works, which the pupil is expected to have 
studied: Longfellow's Evangeline and Courtship of 
Miles Standish (or Tales of a Wayside Inn) ; 
selections from Irving's Sketch Booh (or Irving's 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 7 

Tales of a Traveler; Hawthorne's Twice Told Tales; 
Scott's Ivanhoe and George Eliot's Silas Marner. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic complete, with spe- 
cial attention to the principles of percentage and in- 
terest. Elementary Algebra complete and Advanced 
Algebra through Quadratic Equations. 

History. — The History of the United States com- 
plete as laid down in a good high school text ; the es- 
sential facts of English History ; the essential facts 
of Greek and Roman History. 

Latin. — A sound knowledge of the forms of the 
Latin noun, pronoun and verb, and a knowledge of 
the elementary rules of syntax and composition as 
laid down in a standard first-year book and begin- 
ner's composition (such as Bennett's First Year 
Latin and Bennett's Latin Composition). The first 
three books of Csesar's Gallic War. 

French or German. — A first-year course leading 
to the knowledge of the elements of the grammar and 
the ability to read simple prose. 

Science. — The essential facts of Physical Geog- 
raphy and Physiology as laid down in such texts as 
Tarr's Physical Geography and Martin's Human 
Body. 



8 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

I. Tuition Scholarships 

(Value $50 Each) 

1. Clergy Scholarships. St. Mary's offers with- 
out limit in number, tuition scholarships in the 
academic department to daughters of the clergy. 
These scholarships give academic tuition. The ap- 
pointments to them are made by the Rector of the 
School. 

2. Raleigh City School Scholarships. St. Mary's 
offers each year to that girl of the graduating class 
of the Raleigh High School who stands highest in 
her class a tuition scholarship, giving academic tui- 
tion. The holders of these scholarships are desig- 
nated by the Principal of the Raleigh High School, 
and are entitled to reappointment to the benefits of 
the scholarship until graduation, a term of not longer 
than four years, provided they maintain a satisfac- 
tory record in Scholarship and Deportment. 

3. The Sass Scholarship. One tuition scholarship 
is offered by St. Mary's to a pupil of the Misses Sass' 
School, Charleston, S. C. The appointment is made 
by the Misses Sass for a year at a time, and entitles 
the holder to academic tuition. 

4. Mary Ruffin Smith Scholarship. The Diocese 
of North Carolina has one tuition scholarship at St. 
Mary's, established from the Mary Ruffin Smith 
Fund. The holder is appointed by the Bishop of 
North Carolina. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 9 

//. Board and Tuition Scholarships 

(Value $250 Each) 

1. Mary Ruffin Smith Scholarships. The Diocese 
of North Carolina has two scholarships at St. Mary's 
giving board and academic tuition, established from 
the funds left the Diocese by Miss Mary Ruffin 
Smith. The holders are appointed by the Bishop of 
North Carolina. 

2. Mary E. Chapeau Scholarships. Two scholar- 
ships giving the holders board and academic tuition 
were established at St. Mary's from the legacy left to 
the Diocese of North Carolina before East Carolina 
was taken from it. One of these scholarships belongs 
to the Diocese of North Carolina and one to the Dio- 
cese of East Carolina, and appointments to them are 
made by the Bishops of the Dioceses to which they 
belong. These scholarships are primarily for the 
daughters of the clergy. 

3. The Madame Clement Scholarship. This schol- 
arship was founded in 1906 by the will of Miss 
Eleanor Clement of Philadelphia, who died October, 
1904, in memory of her mother, Madame Clement, 
the first French teacher at St. Mary's. The scholar- 
ship, which gives board and tuition in the academic 
department, is filled, under the action of the Board 
of Trustees, by appointment of the President of the 
Board after conference with the other Bishops of the 
Board. The scholarship is primarily for the daugh- 
ters of the clergy. 



10 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

4. The Eliza Battle Pittman Scholarships. Two 
scholarships at St. Mary's, entitling the holders to 
board and academic tuition, were founded in 1906 
under the will of Mrs. Mary Eliza Pittman, in mem- 
ory of her daughter, Miss Eliza Battle Pittman, 
These scholarships are open only to girls resident in 
Tarboro or Edgecombe County, North Carolina, and 
the appointments are made by the Hector of St. 
Mary's on the nomination of the Rector and Vestry 
of Calvary Church, Tarboro. 

Z/7. The Competitive Scholarships at St. Mary's 

(I) The David R. Murchison Scholarship (Value: $300). 

(II) The Smedes Memorial Scholarship (Value: $270). 

There are at present at St. Mary's two endowed 
scholarships, the holders of which are selected by com- 
petitive examination. These scholarships have priv- 
ileges and restrictions as follows: 

I. The Murchison Scholarship was founded in 
1903 by Miss Lucile Murchison of Wilmington, 1ST. 
C, in memory of her father. A sum of $5,000.00 
was given in trust to the corporation, the interest of 
which is applied to the scholarship, and amounts now 
to the value of $300.00 a year. To be eligible for 
the scholarship, in addition to the general qualifica- 
tions, a girl must be a resident of the Diocese of East 
Carolina. 

II. The Smedes Scholarship was founded in 1904 
by the Alumnse of St. Mary's in memory of Rev. Dr. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 11 

Aldert Smedes, founder and first Rector of the 
school ; of Sarah Lyell Smedes, his wife ; and of Rev. 
Dr. Bennett Smedes, their son and the second Rector 
of the school. The present endowment is $4,000.00, 
and the value of the Scholarship is $270 annually. 
To be eligible for the scholarship, in addition to the 
general qualifications, a girl must be a resident of 
North Carolina or of South Carolina. 

General Qualifications 

To be eligible for these scholarships, a girl must be 
at least fourteen years of age, of high moral charac- 
ter, and qualified to enter the Freshman Class of the 
College Department. She need not necessarily be a 
member of the Episcopal Church. 

After entrance the holders of the scholarships must 
pursue regular academic courses, and maintain the 
required standard of scholarship and deportment. 
For the present a consistent average of 90 per cent in 
the full course and of "Excellent" in deportment is 
required. The holders complying with these condi- 
tions are entitled to the scholarships until graduation, 
a term not exceeding four years. 

The next examination, in ordinary course, for the 
Smedes Scholarship will be held in May, 1913 ; for 
the Murchison Scholarship in May, 1914. 



12 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

The Method of Filling the Competitive 
Scholarships 

When vacant, these scholarships are filled by com- 
petitive examination, open to all qualified candidates. 

/. Application 

Candidates for the scholarships may file their ap- 
plications at any time with the Rector of the School. 
Inasmuch as a certificate of good moral character 
should be filed at the time application is made, and 
this certificate should preferably be given by the Rec- 
tor of the parish, it is better to make application 
through him on the blanks provided for the purpose. 
(See Form S, 1, page 18.) 

II. The Examination 

1. Subjects. The examination covers and in- 
cludes the subjects required for entrance into the 
College, and only so much of each subject as is re- 
quired for entrance into the College. The candidate 
is examined on (1) English; (2) History; (3) 
Science; (4) Mathematics; and (5) one foreign lan- 
guage (Latin, French, German, or Greek). 

2. Place and Time. The examination is held si- 
multaneously in each parish in which there is a quali- 
fied candidate, at a place in each parish to be desig- 
nated by the Rector of the parish, or in case there is 
no Rector, by such other person as may be designated 
by the Rector of the School, and on the date set by 
the School authorities. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 13 

3. Supervision. The questions for the examina- 
tion are prepared at the School and forwarded to the 
examiners in each place in which the examination 
is to be held, in sufficient time for the examination. 
The examination is directly in charge of the Rector 
of the parish or the person designated by the School 
authorities to act in his stead, and he will, if expe- 
dient, ask the superintendent or principal of the town 
schools to act with him as coexaminer. At the close 
of the examination the examiners, one or more of 
whom is to be present throughout the examination, 
will fill up one of the blank certificates provided for 
that purpose, certifying to the proper conduct and 
fairness of the examination, and forward the same 
along with the candidate's papers to the School au- 
thorities. (See Form S, 3, page 22.) 

III. The Conduct of the Examination 

1. The candidates for the scholarship in any par- 
ish assemble for the examination in the place desig- 
nated by the examiner for that parish, on the morn- 
ing of the day appointed for the examination, pre- 
pared to write the examination in ink, on good paper, 
of legal-cap size. 

2. The questions in each subject are furnished on 
separate sheets of paper by the examiner, and the 
candidate must complete the examination in each 
subject and hand it in to the examiner before receiv- 
ing the paper in the next subject. 



14 St. Mary's School Bulletin. 

3. Such parts of two days as may be necessary are 
allowed for the examination, but all the subjects may 
be taken in one day if the examiner and the candi- 
dates so agree. ~No time-limit is set for any individ- 
ual examination, but the total time in the five sub- 
jects should not exceed ten hours, and two hours 
should be ample for any one subject. 

4. The examinations should be given in the follow- 
ng order : ( 1 ) English ; ( 2 ) History ; ( 3 ) Science ; 
(4) Mathematics; (5) Foreign Language; and if the 
examination is given in two sessions, whether in one 
or two days, the first three subjects should be given 
at the first session. 

5. The candidate should be notified at the begin- 
ning of the examination to write her name and the 
subject at the top of every sheet of paper, and to 
write on only one side of the paper; to read and un- 
derstand all the questions in a subject before begin- 
ning to write the answers ; to be careful in penman- 
ship, spelling, and the use of English ; to be neat ; and 
finally to waste no time in giving information which 
is not asked for in the questions. 

6. When she has finished the last subject and so 
completed the examination, the examiner furnishes 
each candidate with the blank form (Form S, 3) 
on which she must certify that the questions have 
been answered fairly and without assistance from any 
source, and this certificate must be attached to the 
candidate's papers. Papers defective in this or any 
other important respect are liable to be rejected. 



St. Mary's School Bulletin. 15 

IV. The Marking 

The papers of the candidates must be forwarded 
promptly to the Rector of St. Mary's, and are then 
promptly examined and marked at the School, and 
the scholarship is awarded to the candidate furnish- 
ing the best papers, provided that no candidate will be 
appointed to the scholarship who fails to make a gen- 
eral average of 90 per cent on the five subjects, or 
who falls below 75 per cent on any one subject. 



Form S, 1. 
St Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C. 



Application foe Examination foe a Competitive 

ScHOLAESHIP. 



This blank is for the use of candidates for a schol- 
arship in making application for the privilege of ex- 
amination. 

The other side of this sheet should be filled out and 
this form mailed to the Rector of St. Mary's as soon 
as a girl has decided to make application for a schol- 
arship. 



(Before sending in this application, have the fol- 
lowing certificate filled out by your Rector, School 
Principal, or some other responsible person. Then 
tear out this sheet and mail it to the Rector, St. 
Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C.) 

I know personally the young lady making this ap- 
plication, and consider her a proper candidate for 
this Scholarship. 

(Signed) 

(Official position) 

Date , 

Address 

Remarks: 

17 



Form S, 1. 
St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C. 



Application foe Examination foe a Competitive 
Scholaeship. 

(Date) 

I hereby make application to be entered as a can- 
didate for examination for the next vacancy in a com- 
petitive scholarship at St. Mary's School, and to that 
end have correctly answered the questions below. 

(Name in full) 

1. When born ? 

2. Your postoffice address ? 

3. Your parent or guardian ?. 

4. His or her address ? 

5. Where do you attend school ? 

6. Who is the principal? 

1. What church do you attend ? 

8. Are you a communicant? 

9. Having carefully read the requirements for the 

scholarship, do you think yourself properly 
qualified to become an applicant ? 

10. To what parish do you belong, and who is the 

Rector? 

18 



Form S, 2. 
St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C. 



Notice in Regard to Candidates and Particu- 
lars of Examination for Scholarship. 



(This form is to be used by the Rector of each par- 
ish or the School Superintendent or Principal who 
has one or more candidates for a scholarship ; and 
should be filled out and mailed to St. Mary's as soon 
as the examiner has made arrangements for the ex- 
amination.) 



(Date) 

To the Rector of St. Mary's School: 

I desire to notify you that I expect to have candi- 
dates for the competitive examination for the 

Smedes ) 

-, r , . y Scholarship at St. Mary's School. 

ivlurchison j 

(erase one) 

(Signed) 

(Official position) 

19 



Form S, 2. 
St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C. 



Notice About Candidates and Their Examina- 
tion. 

My candidates are: 



Their Applications for Examination {Form 8,1) 
have already been forwarded, 
are herewith enclosed. 

(erase one) 

In my parish the examination will be held at 
, with 



and myself as examiners. 

I accordingly desire you to forward to me 

sets of examination questions in sufficient time for 
the examination to be held on the date appointed, and 
after the examination I will forward the papers of 
the candidates to you promptly, with Form S, 3, 
properly filled. 

(Signed) 

(Postoffice) 

(Parish) < 

20 



Form S, 3. 
St. Mary's School, Raleigh, ]ST. C. 



SCHOLARSHIPS. 



Certificate of Proper Examination. 



(A copy of this blank should be handed to each 
candidate by the examiner at the close of her exami- 
nation, and on it she should write her pledge. The 
examiners should then complete the certificate and 
forward it with the papers to the school.) 



21 



Form S, 3. 
St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C. 



Examination Certificate. 

(Date) 

I hereby certify that I have answered the ques- 
tions given in the competitive examination for the 
Scholarship without assist- 
ance of any kind from any source but my own knowl- 
edge. 

(Signed) 

(Address) 



Examinee's Certificate. 

(Date) 

We herewith submit the papers of the candidate 
above mentioned, and certify that the examination 
has been conducted in accordance with the instruc- 
tions issued by the school and in a manner fair to all 
concerned. 



Examiners. 



22 



An Estimate of a Year's Expense at 
St. Mary's School 

Board, Fuel, Light, Laundry, Medical Fee, etc $250 

Tuition 50 

Piano, with Theory and use of Piano 65 

Vocal, with Theory and use of Piano 75 

Violin, with Theory 70 

Art — Drawing 30 

Painting 50 

Elocution — Class, $10; Private 50 

Business Course 50 

Domestic Science 25 

Room Place, if in Room $10 or 25 

Incidental Expenses : 

Books, Stationery, Medicine, Sheet Music, Art 
Materials — according to need ; probably about $25. 

This estimate includes all regular school charges 
for the full year; payments are due quarterly in ad- 
vance. An itemized account of Incidental Expenses 
is rendered quarterly. 

This estimate shows that a year's course without 
extras will cost about $325 ; with one extra, $100. 

Applicants for scholarships should deduct the 
value of the Scholarship from the total charges to 
determine the expenses in case of appointment. 



23 



ST. MARY'S 

The Diocesan School {for girls) of the Carolinas 



The 72d session of St. Mary's School begins Sep- 
tember 18, 1913. 

For catalogue and other information, address 
REV. GEORGE W. LAY, 

Rector. 



24 



J